List of Latin-script digraphs

ngrrnjczdhquzhaaae
This is a list of digraphs used in various Latin alphabets.wikipedia
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Digraph (orthography)

digraphdigraphsdouble vowel
This is a list of digraphs used in various Latin alphabets.
Some such digraphs are used for purely etymological reasons, like rh in English.

Finnish orthography

FinnishFinnish alphabetm'''inä
is used in the orthographies of Dutch, Finnish and other languages with phonemic long vowels for, as well as in the orthography of Northumbrian.

Hungarian alphabet

HungarianHungarian orthographyalphabet
is used in the Hungarian alphabet for a voiceless postalveolar affricate,.

Wymysorys language

WymysorysVilamovianwym.
In Wymysorys, it represents (also spelt ).

Polish orthography

PolishPolish code pagesAmigaPL
In Polish orthography, it represents whenever it precedes a vowel, and whenever it precedes a consonant (or in the end of the word), and is considered a graphic variant of ć appearing in other situations. in Polish orthography, it usually represents whenever it precedes a vowel, and whenever it precedes a consonant (or in the end of the word), and is considered a graphic variant of ń appearing in other situations.
Polish additionally uses the digraphs ch, cz, dz, dź, dż, rz, and sz.

Guinean languages alphabet

older official orthographyorthography for languages of Guinea (pre-1985)orthography used in Guinea before 1985
In the orthography used in Guinea before 1985, was used in Pular (a Fula language) for the voiced bilabial implosive, whereas in Xhosa, Zulu, and Shona, represents the implosive and represents the plosive.

Fula language

FulaFulfuldeFulani
In the orthography used in Guinea before 1985, was used in Pular (a Fula language) for the voiced bilabial implosive, whereas in Xhosa, Zulu, and Shona, represents the implosive and represents the plosive.
a, aa, b, mb (or nb), ɓ, c, d, nd, ɗ, e, ee, f, g, ng, h, i, ii, j, nj, k, l, m, n, ŋ, ɲ (ny or ñ), o, oo, p, r, s, t, u, uu, w, y, ƴ or y, '

Welsh orthography

Welsh alphabetWelshchw'''e
In Welsh orthography, represents the diphthong.

Albanian alphabet

AlbanianArvanitic alphabetAlbanian inscriptions
is used in the Albanian alphabet for the voiced palatal plosive, though for Gheg speakers it represents.

Pinyin

Hanyu PinyinpPīnyīn
is used in Pinyin for in languages such as Yi, where b stands for. is used in Central Alaskan Yup'ik for, and in Pinyin to write the trilled vowel in languages such as Yi.
From s, z, c come the digraphs sh, zh, ch by analogy with English sh, ch.

Hausa language

HausaHausa-languagehau
It is also used for this sound in the Hausa language in Nigeria, but in Niger, Hausa is replaced with.

Italian language

ItalianItalian-languageit
In many European languages, before front vowels represents a sequence such as, e.g. English success, French occire, Spanish accidente (dialectally or ); this is not the case of Italian, where a before a front vowel represents a geminated, as in lacci.

Hungarian language

HungarianMagyarHungarian-language
In Hungarian, it was formerly used for the sound, which is now written.
Additionally, the letter pairs [[Hungarian ny|]], [[Hungarian ty|]], and [[Hungarian gy|]] represent the palatal consonants,, and (a little like the "d+y" sounds in British "duke" or American "would you")—a bit like saying "d" with the tongue pointing to the palate.

Transliteration

translit.transliteratedtransliterate
is found in English language with words from the Greek language and transliterated through the Latin language.
Transliteration is a type of conversion of a text from one script to another that involves swapping letters (thus trans- + liter-) in predictable ways (such as α → a, д → d, χ → ch, ն → n or æ → ae).

Ć

In Polish orthography, it represents whenever it precedes a vowel, and whenever it precedes a consonant (or in the end of the word), and is considered a graphic variant of ć appearing in other situations.

Pronunciation of English ⟨wh⟩

wine–whine mergerwine''–''whine'' mergerwine-whine merger
For details, see Pronunciation of English ⟨wh⟩.
The pronunciation of the digraph in English has changed over time, and still varies today between different regions and accents.

Ń

in Polish orthography, it usually represents whenever it precedes a vowel, and whenever it precedes a consonant (or in the end of the word), and is considered a graphic variant of ń appearing in other situations.
In the Belarusian Łacinka alphabet; the alphabets of Polish, Kashubian, Wymysorys and the Sorbian languages; and the romanization of Khmer, it represents, which is the same as Czech and Slovak ň, Serbo-Croatian and Albanian nj, Spanish and Galician ñ, Italian and French gn, Hungarian and Catalan ny, and Portuguese nh. In Yoruba, it is used to connect a pronoun to a verb.

Trill consonant

Trilltrillstrilled
is used in Central Alaskan Yup'ik for, and in Pinyin to write the trilled vowel in languages such as Yi.
Standard Spanish <rr> as in perro, for example is an alveolar trill.

Interrogative word

interrogative pronouninterrogativeinterrogative pronouns
is used Faroese and Icelandic for (often ), generally in wh-words, but also in other words, such as Faroese hvonn.
They are sometimes called wh-words, because in English most of them start with wh- (compare Five Ws).

Tongan language

TonganTongaton
It is considered a single letter in many Austronesian languages (Māori, Tagalog, Tongan, Gilbertese, Tuvaluan, Indonesian, Chamorro), the Welsh language, and Rheinische Dokumenta, for velar nasal ; and in some African languages (Lingala, Bambara, Wolof) for prenasalized.

Labialized velar consonant

labiovelarLabio- velarlabiovelars
is used in various languages for the labialized velar consonant, and in Dene Suline (Chipewyan) for.
In English, it developed into wh or h (how), pronounced /w/ in most dialects and /h/, respectively, via Grimm's law followed by wh-cluster reductions.

List of Latin-script trigraphs

schSch (trigraph)oin
is used in Alaskan Tlingit for, which in Canada is written khw.
It also represents in Tibetan Pinyin, where it is alternatively written än.

Rose ffrench, 1st Baroness ffrench

Rose, Lady ffrenchRose ffrench
Very rarely, may be found word-initially in English, such as in proper names (e.g., Rose ffrench, Jasper Fforde).
The title and the family name are both spelled with a lower-case double-'f'.

Igbo language

IgboIboIbo language
is used in Igbo for, and in Arrernte for.

L

(capital or uppercase) script L
It is placed between J and L in alphabetical order.