List of Latin and Greek words commonly used in systematic names

ImbricataMinutaTinctoriaErectaGiganteumAngolensisGlossary of scientific namesAmericanumVulgareAromatica
This list of Latin and Greek words commonly used in systematic names is intended to help those unfamiliar with classical languages to understand and remember the scientific names of organisms.wikipedia
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Latin

Latin languageLat.la
The binomial nomenclature used for animals and plants is largely derived from Latin and Greek words, as are some of the names used for higher taxa, such as orders and above.
In particular, Latin (and Ancient Greek) roots are used in English descriptions of theology, the sciences, medicine, and law.

Binomial nomenclature

scientific namebinomial namebinomial authority
The binomial nomenclature used for animals and plants is largely derived from Latin and Greek words, as are some of the names used for higher taxa, such as orders and above.

Classical language

classical languagesclassicalclassics
This list of Latin and Greek words commonly used in systematic names is intended to help those unfamiliar with classical languages to understand and remember the scientific names of organisms.

Animal

Animaliaanimalsmetazoa
The binomial nomenclature used for animals and plants is largely derived from Latin and Greek words, as are some of the names used for higher taxa, such as orders and above.

Plant

Plantaeplantsflora
The binomial nomenclature used for animals and plants is largely derived from Latin and Greek words, as are some of the names used for higher taxa, such as orders and above.

Greek language

GreekAncient GreekModern Greek
The binomial nomenclature used for animals and plants is largely derived from Latin and Greek words, as are some of the names used for higher taxa, such as orders and above.

Taxon

taxagrouppolytypic
The binomial nomenclature used for animals and plants is largely derived from Latin and Greek words, as are some of the names used for higher taxa, such as orders and above.

Order (biology)

ordersuborderorders
The binomial nomenclature used for animals and plants is largely derived from Latin and Greek words, as are some of the names used for higher taxa, such as orders and above.

Carl Linnaeus

LinnaeusL.Carl von Linné
At the time when biologist Carl Linnaeus (1707–1778) published the books that are now accepted as the starting point of binomial nomenclature, Latin was used in Western Europe as the common language of science, and scientific names were in Latin or Greek: Linnaeus continued this practice.

Western Europe

WesternWestern EuropeanWest European
At the time when biologist Carl Linnaeus (1707–1778) published the books that are now accepted as the starting point of binomial nomenclature, Latin was used in Western Europe as the common language of science, and scientific names were in Latin or Greek: Linnaeus continued this practice.

Classics

classicistclassical scholarclassical
Although Latin is now largely unused except by classical scholars, or for certain purposes in botany, medicine and the Roman Catholic Church, it can still be found in scientific names.

Botany

botanistbotanicalplant biology
Although Latin is now largely unused except by classical scholars, or for certain purposes in botany, medicine and the Roman Catholic Church, it can still be found in scientific names.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
Although Latin is now largely unused except by classical scholars, or for certain purposes in botany, medicine and the Roman Catholic Church, it can still be found in scientific names.

Chimpanzee

chimpanzeescommon chimpanzeePan troglodytes
For instance Pan troglodytes, the chimpanzee, and Troglodytes troglodytes, the wren, are not necessarily cave-dwellers.

Eurasian wren

wrenwrensTroglodytes troglodytes
For instance Pan troglodytes, the chimpanzee, and Troglodytes troglodytes, the wren, are not necessarily cave-dwellers.

Genus

generageneric namegeneric
Sometimes a genus name or specific descriptor is simply the Latin or Greek name for the animal (e.g. Canis is Latin for dog).

Species

specificspecific epithetspecific name
Sometimes a genus name or specific descriptor is simply the Latin or Greek name for the animal (e.g. Canis is Latin for dog).

Lemma (morphology)

lemmacitation formdictionary form
Adjectives vary according to gender, and in most cases only the lemma form (nominative singular masculine form) is listed here.

Nominative case

nominativenom.NOM
Adjectives vary according to gender, and in most cases only the lemma form (nominative singular masculine form) is listed here.

Grammatical number

numbersingularnumbers
Adjectives vary according to gender, and in most cases only the lemma form (nominative singular masculine form) is listed here.