List of World Series broadcasters

World SeriesWorld Series broadcasterscallcoverage)televised World Seriestelevision broadcasts of the World Series
The following is a list of national American television and radio networks and announcers that have broadcast World Series games over the years.wikipedia
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Fox Major League Baseball

FoxMajor League BaseballFox Sports
The 2011 World Series was televised in the United States and Canada by Fox. Joe Buck called play-by-play on his 14th World Series for the network, dating back to, while color analyst Tim McCarver handled his 22nd World Series since . Ken Rosenthal served as field reporter for the games, while Chris Rose hosted the pregame and postgame coverage with analysts A. J. Pierzynski and Eric Karros. 2001 – For the second consecutive year, Fox carried the World Series over its network with its top broadcast team, Joe Buck and Tim McCarver (himself a Yankees broadcaster). This was the first year of Fox's exclusive rights to the World Series (in the previous contract, Fox only broadcast the World Series in even numbered years while NBC broadcast it in odd numbered years), which it has held ever since (this particular contract also had given Fox exclusive rights to the entire baseball postseason, which aired over its family of networks; the contract was modified following Disney's purchase of Fox Family Channel shortly after the World Series ended, as ESPN regained their postseason rights following a year of postseason games on ABC Family, Fox Family's successor). 2015 – Fox suffered an outage during their broadcast of Game 1, resulting in a loss of coverage for 15 minutes, followed a 5-minute delay in-game while officials addressed the availability of video review due to the loss of Fox's feed. The teams agreed to allow the use of footage from MLB International's world feed of the game for video review, while Fox also temporarily switched to the MLB International feed with Matt Vasgersian and John Smoltz, later replaced by Joe Buck, Harold Reynolds, and Tom Verducci before the main Fox Sports production was restored.
On October 2, 2012, the new deal between Major League Baseball and Fox was officially confirmed; it included the television rights to 12 Saturday afternoon games on Fox (reduced from 26), 40 games on Fox Sports 1 (with Fox Sports 2 airing certain ones as an overflow feed in case of overlapping telecasts), rights to the All-Star Game, two League Division Series (two games were sold to MLB Network, the rest would air on Fox Sports 1), one League Championship Series (in which Fox Sports and Turner Sports would each respectively alternate coverage of American League and National League postseason games each year on an odd-even basis, with Games 1 and, if necessary, 6 in 2014 airing on Fox ), and the World Series (which would remain on Fox).

Major League Baseball on NBC

NBCMajor League BaseballNBC Sports
2001 – For the second consecutive year, Fox carried the World Series over its network with its top broadcast team, Joe Buck and Tim McCarver (himself a Yankees broadcaster). This was the first year of Fox's exclusive rights to the World Series (in the previous contract, Fox only broadcast the World Series in even numbered years while NBC broadcast it in odd numbered years), which it has held ever since (this particular contract also had given Fox exclusive rights to the entire baseball postseason, which aired over its family of networks; the contract was modified following Disney's purchase of Fox Family Channel shortly after the World Series ended, as ESPN regained their postseason rights following a year of postseason games on ABC Family, Fox Family's successor). Longtime Los Angeles Dodgers' broadcaster Vin Scully called the 1988 World Series for a national television audience on NBC with Joe Garagiola. Unknown to the fans and the media at the time, Kirk Gibson was watching the game on television while undergoing physical therapy in the Dodgers' clubhouse. At some point during the game, television cameras scanned the Dodgers dugout and Scully, observed that Gibson was nowhere to be found. This spurred Gibson to tell Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda that he was available to pinch hit. Gibson immediately returned to the batting cage in the clubhouse to take practice swings. Bob Costas, who along with Marv Albert, hosted NBC's World Series pregame coverage and handled postgame interviews made on-air statements that enraged many in the Dodgers' clubhouse (especially manager Tommy Lasorda). After the Dodgers won Game 4, Lasorda (during a postgame interview with Marv Albert) sarcastically said that the MVP of the World Series should be Bob Costas. While Kirk Gibson was taking practice swings in the Dodgers' clubhouse during Game 1, Orel Hershiser set up the hitting tee for his teammate. Along the way, Costas could hear Gibson's agonized-sounding grunts after every hit. Costas said that the 1988 Dodgers possibly had the weakest hitting line-up in World Series history.
1947 also saw the first televised World Series.

Marv Albert

MarvMarv Marv MarvThe Marv Albert Show
Longtime Los Angeles Dodgers' broadcaster Vin Scully called the 1988 World Series for a national television audience on NBC with Joe Garagiola. Unknown to the fans and the media at the time, Kirk Gibson was watching the game on television while undergoing physical therapy in the Dodgers' clubhouse. At some point during the game, television cameras scanned the Dodgers dugout and Scully, observed that Gibson was nowhere to be found. This spurred Gibson to tell Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda that he was available to pinch hit. Gibson immediately returned to the batting cage in the clubhouse to take practice swings. Bob Costas, who along with Marv Albert, hosted NBC's World Series pregame coverage and handled postgame interviews made on-air statements that enraged many in the Dodgers' clubhouse (especially manager Tommy Lasorda). After the Dodgers won Game 4, Lasorda (during a postgame interview with Marv Albert) sarcastically said that the MVP of the World Series should be Bob Costas. While Kirk Gibson was taking practice swings in the Dodgers' clubhouse during Game 1, Orel Hershiser set up the hitting tee for his teammate. Along the way, Costas could hear Gibson's agonized-sounding grunts after every hit. Costas said that the 1988 Dodgers possibly had the weakest hitting line-up in World Series history.
He also worked as a co-host and reporter for two World Series (1986 and 1988)

1952 World Series

1952World Series52
The NBC telecasts of Games 6 and 7 are believed to be the oldest surviving television broadcasts of the World Series, as they were preserved via kinescope by sponsor Gillette.

World Series

championship seriesWorld ChampionshipFall Classic
The following is a list of national American television and radio networks and announcers that have broadcast World Series games over the years.
World Series broadcasters

Brent Musburger

Brent
While at CBS, Musburger also covered the Super Bowl, NBA Finals, the World Series, U.S. Open tennis, and The Masters.

Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio

ESPNESPN RadioMLB
ESPN Radio broadcast the 2011 World Series nationally. This was the first World Series for play-by play announcer Dan Shulman and analysts Orel Hershiser and Bobby Valentine. ESPN Deportes Radio aired the Series for Spanish language listeners, with Ernesto Jerez and Guillermo Celis announcing.
List of World Series broadcasters

2009 Philadelphia Phillies season

Philadelphia PhilliesPhillies2009
Locally, the Series was called on WOGL-AM in Philadelphia by Harry Kalas, Richie Ashburn, Chris Wheeler and Andy Musser, and on CJCL-AM in Toronto by Jerry Howarth and Tom Cheek. Cheek's call of the Carter home run ("Touch 'em all Joe, you'll never hit a bigger home run in your life!") lives on in Blue Jays folklore. This was Richie Ashburn's last World Series as a Phillies broadcaster, as he died in 1997. Andy Musser also called his last World Series as a member of the Phillies' broadcast team; he retired in 2001 and died eleven years later. Tom Cheek never called another postseason game in his role as voice of the Blue Jays, from which he retired in 2005 prior to his death from brain cancer. Meanwhile, Harry Kalas would not call another World Series until 2008. Kalas later died in 2009 prior to a game at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C.. Chris Wheeler continues to call games for the Phillies although in a limited capacity and Jerry Howarth has continued to call Blue Jays games, moving into the primary play-by-play position following the death of Cheek.
The World Series broadcasters were Joe Buck and Tim McCarver on the Fox telecasts, and Joe Morgan and Jon Miller on ESPN Radio for the national broadcast.

Television network

networknetwork televisiontelevision
The following is a list of national American television and radio networks and announcers that have broadcast World Series games over the years.

Radio network

networkradioradio networks
The following is a list of national American television and radio networks and announcers that have broadcast World Series games over the years.

1947 World Series

1947World Series1947 National League pennant
Television coverage of the World Series began in 1947.

2018 World Series

2018World Series2018 Series
They are (through 2018) Tim McCarver (24 times), Joe Buck (21), Mel Allen (11), Vin Scully (11, 13 more seasons on radio), Curt Gowdy (11), Joe Garagiola (9), and Al Michaels (8).

Tim McCarver

The 2011 World Series was televised in the United States and Canada by Fox. Joe Buck called play-by-play on his 14th World Series for the network, dating back to, while color analyst Tim McCarver handled his 22nd World Series since . Ken Rosenthal served as field reporter for the games, while Chris Rose hosted the pregame and postgame coverage with analysts A. J. Pierzynski and Eric Karros. 2001 – For the second consecutive year, Fox carried the World Series over its network with its top broadcast team, Joe Buck and Tim McCarver (himself a Yankees broadcaster). This was the first year of Fox's exclusive rights to the World Series (in the previous contract, Fox only broadcast the World Series in even numbered years while NBC broadcast it in odd numbered years), which it has held ever since (this particular contract also had given Fox exclusive rights to the entire baseball postseason, which aired over its family of networks; the contract was modified following Disney's purchase of Fox Family Channel shortly after the World Series ended, as ESPN regained their postseason rights following a year of postseason games on ABC Family, Fox Family's successor). They are (through 2018) Tim McCarver (24 times), Joe Buck (21), Mel Allen (11), Vin Scully (11, 13 more seasons on radio), Curt Gowdy (11), Joe Garagiola (9), and Al Michaels (8).

Joe Buck

JoeJoe Duck
The 2011 World Series was televised in the United States and Canada by Fox. Joe Buck called play-by-play on his 14th World Series for the network, dating back to, while color analyst Tim McCarver handled his 22nd World Series since . Ken Rosenthal served as field reporter for the games, while Chris Rose hosted the pregame and postgame coverage with analysts A. J. Pierzynski and Eric Karros. 2001 – For the second consecutive year, Fox carried the World Series over its network with its top broadcast team, Joe Buck and Tim McCarver (himself a Yankees broadcaster). This was the first year of Fox's exclusive rights to the World Series (in the previous contract, Fox only broadcast the World Series in even numbered years while NBC broadcast it in odd numbered years), which it has held ever since (this particular contract also had given Fox exclusive rights to the entire baseball postseason, which aired over its family of networks; the contract was modified following Disney's purchase of Fox Family Channel shortly after the World Series ended, as ESPN regained their postseason rights following a year of postseason games on ABC Family, Fox Family's successor). They are (through 2018) Tim McCarver (24 times), Joe Buck (21), Mel Allen (11), Vin Scully (11, 13 more seasons on radio), Curt Gowdy (11), Joe Garagiola (9), and Al Michaels (8). 2015 – Fox suffered an outage during their broadcast of Game 1, resulting in a loss of coverage for 15 minutes, followed a 5-minute delay in-game while officials addressed the availability of video review due to the loss of Fox's feed. The teams agreed to allow the use of footage from MLB International's world feed of the game for video review, while Fox also temporarily switched to the MLB International feed with Matt Vasgersian and John Smoltz, later replaced by Joe Buck, Harold Reynolds, and Tom Verducci before the main Fox Sports production was restored.

Mel Allen

hostMel
They are (through 2018) Tim McCarver (24 times), Joe Buck (21), Mel Allen (11), Vin Scully (11, 13 more seasons on radio), Curt Gowdy (11), Joe Garagiola (9), and Al Michaels (8).

Vin Scully

The Vin Scully ShowVincent Edward Scully
Longtime Los Angeles Dodgers' broadcaster Vin Scully called the 1988 World Series for a national television audience on NBC with Joe Garagiola. Unknown to the fans and the media at the time, Kirk Gibson was watching the game on television while undergoing physical therapy in the Dodgers' clubhouse. At some point during the game, television cameras scanned the Dodgers dugout and Scully, observed that Gibson was nowhere to be found. This spurred Gibson to tell Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda that he was available to pinch hit. Gibson immediately returned to the batting cage in the clubhouse to take practice swings. Bob Costas, who along with Marv Albert, hosted NBC's World Series pregame coverage and handled postgame interviews made on-air statements that enraged many in the Dodgers' clubhouse (especially manager Tommy Lasorda). After the Dodgers won Game 4, Lasorda (during a postgame interview with Marv Albert) sarcastically said that the MVP of the World Series should be Bob Costas. While Kirk Gibson was taking practice swings in the Dodgers' clubhouse during Game 1, Orel Hershiser set up the hitting tee for his teammate. Along the way, Costas could hear Gibson's agonized-sounding grunts after every hit. Costas said that the 1988 Dodgers possibly had the weakest hitting line-up in World Series history. They are (through 2018) Tim McCarver (24 times), Joe Buck (21), Mel Allen (11), Vin Scully (11, 13 more seasons on radio), Curt Gowdy (11), Joe Garagiola (9), and Al Michaels (8).

Curt Gowdy

Gowdy
They are (through 2018) Tim McCarver (24 times), Joe Buck (21), Mel Allen (11), Vin Scully (11, 13 more seasons on radio), Curt Gowdy (11), Joe Garagiola (9), and Al Michaels (8).

Al Michaels

Al Michaels Award
They are (through 2018) Tim McCarver (24 times), Joe Buck (21), Mel Allen (11), Vin Scully (11, 13 more seasons on radio), Curt Gowdy (11), Joe Garagiola (9), and Al Michaels (8).

Major League Baseball on television

television contractsMajor League Baseball television contractMajor League Baseball coverage
*Per the current broadcast agreement, the World Series will be televised by Fox through 2021.

John Smoltz

Smoltz
2015 – Fox suffered an outage during their broadcast of Game 1, resulting in a loss of coverage for 15 minutes, followed a 5-minute delay in-game while officials addressed the availability of video review due to the loss of Fox's feed. The teams agreed to allow the use of footage from MLB International's world feed of the game for video review, while Fox also temporarily switched to the MLB International feed with Matt Vasgersian and John Smoltz, later replaced by Joe Buck, Harold Reynolds, and Tom Verducci before the main Fox Sports production was restored.

Ken Rosenthal

The 2011 World Series was televised in the United States and Canada by Fox. Joe Buck called play-by-play on his 14th World Series for the network, dating back to, while color analyst Tim McCarver handled his 22nd World Series since . Ken Rosenthal served as field reporter for the games, while Chris Rose hosted the pregame and postgame coverage with analysts A. J. Pierzynski and Eric Karros.

Tom Verducci

2015 – Fox suffered an outage during their broadcast of Game 1, resulting in a loss of coverage for 15 minutes, followed a 5-minute delay in-game while officials addressed the availability of video review due to the loss of Fox's feed. The teams agreed to allow the use of footage from MLB International's world feed of the game for video review, while Fox also temporarily switched to the MLB International feed with Matt Vasgersian and John Smoltz, later replaced by Joe Buck, Harold Reynolds, and Tom Verducci before the main Fox Sports production was restored.