List of X-planes

X-planeX-planesX-seriesexperimental aircraftresearchseries of postwar X-planesSpecial researchX-35X-plane programX-series aircraft
The X-planes are a series of experimental United States aircraft and rockets, used to test and evaluate new technologies and aerodynamic concepts.wikipedia
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North American X-15

X-15North American X-15A-2X-15 rocket plane
Later X-planes supported important research in a multitude of aerodynamic and technical fields, but only the North American X-15 rocket plane of the early 1960s achieved comparable fame to that of the X-1.
The North American X-15 was a hypersonic rocket-powered aircraft operated by the United States Air Force and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as part of the X-plane series of experimental aircraft.

List of military aircraft of the United States (naval)

allscout bomberU.S. Navy
Not all US experimental aircraft have been designated as X-planes; some received US Navy designations before 1962, while others have been known only by manufacturers' designations, non-'X'-series designations, or classified codenames.
Prototypes are normally prefixed with "X" and often unnamed (note that these are not the same as the experimental X-planes, which are not generally expected to go into production), while pre-production models are usually prefixed "Y".

Bell X-1

Bell X1X-1Bell X-1A
The first, the Bell X-1, became well known in 1947 after it became the first aircraft to break the sound barrier in level flight.
The X-1, piloted by Chuck Yeager, was the first crewed airplane to exceed the speed of sound in level flight and was the first of the X-planes, a series of American experimental rocket planes (and non-rocket planes) designed for testing new technologies.

Bell X-2

X-2Bell 52Bell XS-2
The Bell X-2 (nicknamed "Starbuster" ) was an X-plane research aircraft built to investigate flight characteristics in the Mach 2–3 range.

NASA X-43

X-43X-43ABoeing X-43
It was part of the X-plane series and specifically of NASA's Hyper-X program.

Bell X-22

X-22Bell X-22Atilt-fan
The Bell X-22 was an American V/STOL X-plane with four tilting ducted fans.

Trapezoidal wing

diamond shaped trapezoidal wingdiamond-shaped wingstaper
Even with this low-drag wing the Douglas X-3 Stiletto was too underpowered to reach its design flight speed of Mach 2, but the design of its simple hexagonal-airfoil wing was developed for various other X-planes and for Lockheed's widely produced F-104 Starfighter Mach 2.2 high-altitude interceptor.

Tailless aircraft

taillesstailless designno moveable horizontal tail surfaces
Similar to the D.H. 108, the twin-jet powered 1948-vintage Northrop X-4 was one of the series of postwar X-planes experimental aircraft developed in the United States after World War II to fly in research programs exploring the challenges of high-speed transonic flight and beyond.

NASA X-38

X-38X-38 Crew Return Vehicleexperimental spacecraft
In an unusual move for an X-plane, the program involved the European Space Agency and the German Space Agency DLR.

List of military aircraft of the United States

United States military aircraftAaircraft
Prototypes are normally prefixed with "X" and are often unnamed (note that these are not the same as the experimental X-planes, which are not generally expected to go into production), while pre-production models are usually prefixed with "Y".

Lockheed Martin X-59 QueSST

Low Boom Flight DemonstratorQuiet Supersonic TechnologyX-59 QueSST
On April 2, 2018, NASA awarded Lockheed Martin a $247.5 million contract to design, build and deliver in late 2021 the Low-Boom X-plane.

NASA X-57 Maxwell

X-57 MaxwellX-57Leading Edge Asynchronous Propeller Technology
The experiment precedes the X-57 Maxwell X-plane demonstrator proposed under NASA's Transformative Aeronautics Concepts program.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The X-planes are a series of experimental United States aircraft and rockets, used to test and evaluate new technologies and aerodynamic concepts.

Aircraft

heavier-than-airheavier-than-air flightheavier-than-air aircraft
The X-planes are a series of experimental United States aircraft and rockets, used to test and evaluate new technologies and aerodynamic concepts.

Rocket

rocketsrocketryrocket scientist
The X-planes are a series of experimental United States aircraft and rockets, used to test and evaluate new technologies and aerodynamic concepts.

United States Department of Defense aerospace vehicle designation

United States Armed Forces designationUS Military designationcommon naming
They have an X designator, which indicates the research mission within the US system of aircraft designations.
Examples are the entire series of X-planes from the Bell X-1 on.

NASA

National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationNASA Advisory CouncilU.S. space program
Most of the X-planes have been operated by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) or, later, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), often in conjunction with the United States Air Force.

Edwards Air Force Base

Edwards AFBMuroc Army Air FieldEdwards
The majority of X-plane testing has occurred at Edwards Air Force Base.

Sound barrier

speed of soundbreak the sound barrier without a vehiclecompressibility effects
The first, the Bell X-1, became well known in 1947 after it became the first aircraft to break the sound barrier in level flight.

Rocket-powered aircraft

rocket planerocket-poweredrocketplane
Later X-planes supported important research in a multitude of aerodynamic and technical fields, but only the North American X-15 rocket plane of the early 1960s achieved comparable fame to that of the X-1.

Missile

guided missilemissilesguided missiles
X-planes 8, 9, 11, 12, and 17 were actually missiles used to test new types of engines, and some other vehicles were un-manned (some were remotely flown, some were partially or fully autonomous).

Lockheed Martin X-35

X-35X-35BLockheed Martin X-35B
Most X-planes are not expected to go into full-scale production; one exception was the Lockheed Martin X-35, which competed against the Boeing X-32 during the Joint Strike Fighter Program, and has entered production as the F-35.

Boeing X-32

X-32Boeing X-32B Boeing X-32 Joint Strike Fighter
Most X-planes are not expected to go into full-scale production; one exception was the Lockheed Martin X-35, which competed against the Boeing X-32 during the Joint Strike Fighter Program, and has entered production as the F-35.