List of brightest stars

brightest starsbrightest starone of the brightest starssecond brightest starsecond-brightest star13th brightest star2nd brightest7th brightestfourth-brightest starthird-brightest star
This is a list of the brightest stars down to magnitude +2.50, as determined by their maximum, total, or combined visual magnitudes as viewed from Earth.wikipedia
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Betelgeuse

α OriBetelg'''euseBetelgeuse mass loss
New or more accurate photometry, standard filters, or adopting differing methods using standard stars can measure stellar magnitudes slightly differently. This may change the apparent order of lists of bright stars. The table shows measured V magnitudes, which use a specific filter that closely approximates human vision. However, other kinds of magnitude systems do exist based on different wavelengths, some well away from the distribution of the visible wavelengths of light, and these apparent magnitudes vary dramatically in the different systems. For example, Betelgeuse has the K-band (infra-red) apparent magnitude of −4.05. Some stars, like Betelgeuse and Antares, are variable stars, changing their magnitude over days, months or years. In the table, the range of variation is indicated with var . Single magnitude values quoted for variable stars come from a variety of sources. Magnitudes are expressed within the table are when the stars are either at maximum brightness, which is repeated for every cycle, e.g., the eclipsing binary Algol; or, if the variations are small, as a simple average magnitude. For all red variable stars, describing a single maximum brightness is often difficult because each cycle produces a different maximum brightness, which is thought to be caused by poorly understood pulsations in stellar evolution processes. Such quoted stellar brightness is sometimes based on the average maximum apparent magnitude from estimated maximums over many observed light-curve cycles, sometimes spanning across centuries. Results often quoted in the literature are not necessarily straightforward and may differ in expressing an alternate value for a singular maximum brightness or as a range of values.
Betelgeuse, also designated α Orionis (Latinised to Alpha Orionis, abbreviated Alpha Ori, α Ori), is on average the ninth-brightest star in the night sky and second-brightest in the constellation of Orion.

Antares

Antares Bα Scorpionisα
Some stars, like Betelgeuse and Antares, are variable stars, changing their magnitude over days, months or years. In the table, the range of variation is indicated with var . Single magnitude values quoted for variable stars come from a variety of sources. Magnitudes are expressed within the table are when the stars are either at maximum brightness, which is repeated for every cycle, e.g., the eclipsing binary Algol; or, if the variations are small, as a simple average magnitude. For all red variable stars, describing a single maximum brightness is often difficult because each cycle produces a different maximum brightness, which is thought to be caused by poorly understood pulsations in stellar evolution processes. Such quoted stellar brightness is sometimes based on the average maximum apparent magnitude from estimated maximums over many observed light-curve cycles, sometimes spanning across centuries. Results often quoted in the literature are not necessarily straightforward and may differ in expressing an alternate value for a singular maximum brightness or as a range of values.
Antares, also designated α Scorpii (Latinised to Alpha Scorpii, abbreviated Alpha Sco, α Sco), is on average the fifteenth-brightest star in the night sky, and the brightest object in the constellation of Scorpius.

Apparent magnitude

apparent visual magnitudemagnitudevisual magnitude
This is a list of the brightest stars down to magnitude +2.50, as determined by their maximum, total, or combined visual magnitudes as viewed from Earth. Stellar brightness is traditionally based on the apparent visual magnitude as perceived by the human eye, from the brightest stars of 1st magnitude to the faintest at 6th magnitude. Since the invention of the optical telescope and the documenting of binary stars and multiple star systems, stellar brightness could be expressed as either individual (separate) or total (combined) magnitude. The table is ordered by combined magnitude of all naked eye components appearing as if it they were single stars. Such multiple star systems are indicated by parentheses showing the individual magnitudes of component stars bright enough to make a detectable contribution. For example, the double star Alpha Centauri has the total or combined magnitude of −0.27, while its two component stars have magnitudes of +0.01 and +1.33.
The brightest stars in the night sky were said to be of first magnitude ( = 1), whereas the faintest were of sixth magnitude ( = 6), which is the limit of human visual perception (without the aid of a telescope).

Sirius

SothisDog StarSirius B
Sirius (, a latinisation of Greek Σείριος, Seirios, lit."glowing" or "scorching") is a binary star and the brightest star in the night sky.

Canopus

α Carinaea first magnitude starCanopean
Canopus, also designated α Carinae (Latinised to Alpha Carinae, abbreviated Alpha Car, α Car), is the brightest star in the southern constellation of Carina, and the second-brightest star in the night sky, after Sirius.

Vega

2828Botercadentconstellation of Vega
Vega, also designated α Lyrae (Latinised to Alpha Lyrae, abbreviated Alpha Lyr or α Lyr), is the brightest star in the constellation of Lyra, the fifth-brightest star in the night sky, and the second-brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere, after Arcturus.

Rigel

β Ori (Rigel)B2 IaeBeta Orionis
Rigel, also designated β Orionis (Latinized to Beta Orionis, abbreviated Beta Ori, β Ori), is on average the seventh-brightest star in the night sky and the brightest in the constellation of Orion—though occasionally it is outshone within the constellation by the variable star Betelgeuse.

Arcturus

ArcturiansArcturianArcturan
Arcturus, also designated α Boötis (Latinized to Alpha Boötis, abbreviated Alpha Boo, α Boo), is the brightest star in the constellation of Boötes, the fourth-brightest in the night sky, and the brightest in the northern celestial hemisphere.

Capella

AlhaiotAlpha Aurigaealpha Aurigae (Capella)
Capella, also designated α Aurigae (Latinized to Alpha Aurigae, abbreviated Alpha Aur, α Aur), is the brightest object in the constellation of Auriga, the sixth-brightest star in the night sky, and the third-brightest in the northern celestial hemisphere after Arcturus and Vega.

Alpha Centauri

α CentauriAlphaα Centauri A
Stellar brightness is traditionally based on the apparent visual magnitude as perceived by the human eye, from the brightest stars of 1st magnitude to the faintest at 6th magnitude. Since the invention of the optical telescope and the documenting of binary stars and multiple star systems, stellar brightness could be expressed as either individual (separate) or total (combined) magnitude. The table is ordered by combined magnitude of all naked eye components appearing as if it they were single stars. Such multiple star systems are indicated by parentheses showing the individual magnitudes of component stars bright enough to make a detectable contribution. For example, the double star Alpha Centauri has the total or combined magnitude of −0.27, while its two component stars have magnitudes of +0.01 and +1.33.
Alpha Centauri A and B are Sun-like stars (Class G and K), and together they form the binary star Alpha Centauri AB. To the naked eye, the two main components appear to be a single star with an apparent magnitude of −0.27, forming the brightest star in the southern constellation of Centaurus and the third-brightest in the night sky, outshone only by Sirius and Canopus.

Procyon

Canis minorProcyon Aα CMi
Procyon, also designated α Canis Minoris (Latinised to Alpha Canis Minoris, abbreviated Alpha CMi, α CMi), is the brightest object in the constellation of Canis Minor and usually the eighth-brightest star in the night sky with a visual apparent magnitude of 0.34.

Altair

αα AqlAlpha
Altair (from Arabic "al-ṭā'ir" ), also designated α Aquilae (Latinised to Alpha Aquilae, abbreviated Alpha Aql, α Aql), is the brightest star in the constellation of Aquila and the twelfth brightest star in the night sky.

Spica

α VirAlaezelAzimech
Spica, also designated α Virginis (Latinised to Alpha Virginis, abbreviated Alpha Vir, α Vir), is the brightest object in the constellation of Virgo and one of the 20 brightest stars in the night sky.

Fomalhaut

Alpha Piscis AustriniFomalhaut (α PsA)Fomalhaut A
Fomalhaut, also designated Alpha Piscis Austrini (α Piscis Austrini, abbreviated Alpha PsA, α PsA) is the brightest star in the constellation of Piscis Austrinus and one of the brightest stars in the sky.

Achernar

AchenarAchernar Three
Achernar is the name of the primary (or 'A') component of the binary system designated Alpha Eridani (α Eridani, abbreviated Alpha Eri, α Eri), which is the brightest 'star' or point of light in, and lying at the southern tip of, the constellation of Eridanus, and the tenth-brightest in the night sky.

Aldebaran

Alpha Tauribrightest starRohini
It is the brightest star in Taurus and generally the fourteenth-brightest star in the night sky, though it varies slowly in brightness between magnitude 0.75 and 0.95.

Regulus

Alpha LeonisRegulus Astar
Regulus, also designated α Leonis (Latinized to Alpha Leonis, abbreviated Alpha Leo, α Leo), is the brightest object in the constellation of Leo and one of the brightest stars in the night sky, lying approximately 79 light years from the Sun.

Deneb

Alpha Cygniα CygAlpha Cygni (Deneb)
It is generally the 19th brightest star in the night sky, with an average apparent magnitude of 1.25.

Beta Crucis

β CrucisMimosaβ Cru
Beta Crucis (Latinised from β Crucis, abbreviated Beta Cru, β Cru), also called Mimosa, is a binary star system; the second-brightest object in the constellation of Crux (after α Crucis or Acrux) and the 19th-brightest star in the night sky.

Beta Centauri

Hadarβ Cenβ Centauri
The system's combined apparent visual magnitude of 0.61 makes it the second-brightest object in Centaurus and one of the brightest stars in the night sky.

Lambda Scorpii

λ ScoλShaula
Lambda Scorpii (Latinised from λ Scorpii, abbreviated Lambda Sco, λ Sco), also called Shaula, is, despite being designated "λ" (Lambda), the second-brightest star system in the constellation of Scorpius, and one of the brightest "stars" in the night sky.

Alpha Crucis

Acruxα Crucisα Cru
With a combined visual magnitude of 0.76, it is the brightest object in Crux and on average the 13th brightest star in the night sky.

Epsilon Canis Majoris

ε CMaAdharaε Canis Majoris
Epsilon Canis Majoris (Latinised from ε Canis Majoris, abbreviated Epsilon CMa, ε CMa) is a binary star and, despite being designated ε (epsilon), the second-brightest object in the constellation of Canis Major and one of the brightest stars in the night sky with an apparent magnitude of 1.50.

Castor (star)

CastorCastor Aα Gem
Castor, also designated α Geminorum (Latinised to Alpha Geminorum, abbreviated Alpha Gem, α Gem) is the second-brightest object in the constellation of Gemini and one of the brightest stars in the night sky.

Beta Carinae

β Carβ CarinaeMiaplacidus
Beta Carinae (Latinised from β Carinae, abbreviated Beta Car, β Car), officially named Miaplacidus, is the second brightest star in the constellation of Carina and one of the brightest stars in the night sky, with apparent magnitude 1.68.