List of gravitationally rounded objects of the Solar System

Gravitationally rounded objectaverage distance19 moonsa dozen or so confirmed such objectseight planetsgravitationally roundedgravitationally rounded objectsgravitationally rounded satelliteshydrostatic equilibriumList of gravitationally rounded objects in the Solar System
This is a list of gravitationally rounded objects of the Solar System, which are objects that have a rounded, ellipsoidal shape due to their own gravity (current or past hydrostatic equilibrium).wikipedia
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Solar System

outer Solar Systeminner Solar Systemouter planets
It contains almost 99.9% of all the mass in the Solar System. By the IAU's definition, there are eight planets in the Solar System; four terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars) and four giant planets, which can be divided further into two gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) and two ice giants (Uranus and Neptune).
Of the objects that orbit the Sun directly, the largest are the eight planets, with the remainder being smaller objects, the dwarf planets and small Solar System bodies.

Hydrostatic equilibrium

hydrostatic balanceequilibriumhydrostatic
This is a list of gravitationally rounded objects of the Solar System, which are objects that have a rounded, ellipsoidal shape due to their own gravity (current or past hydrostatic equilibrium). The 2006 International Astronomical Union (IAU) defines a planet as a body in orbit around the Sun that was large enough to have achieved hydrostatic equilibrium and to have "cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit".
There are a dozen or so confirmed such objects (apart from the Sun), sometimes called planemos, in the Solar System, with others possible.

Small Solar System body

small Solar System bodiessmall bodiesmacroscopic system
This list does not include most small Solar System bodies, but it does include a sample of possible planetary-mass objects whose shape has yet to be accurately determined.
Except for the largest, which are in hydrostatic equilibrium, natural satellites (moons) differ from small Solar System bodies not in size, but in their orbits.

Titan (moon)

TitanSaturn's moon Titanatmosphere
Titan is the sixth gravitationally rounded moon from Saturn.

Clearing the neighbourhood

cleared the neighborhoodcleared its neighborhoodcleared their neighbourhoods
The 2006 International Astronomical Union (IAU) defines a planet as a body in orbit around the Sun that was large enough to have achieved hydrostatic equilibrium and to have "cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit".

Gas giant

gas giantsgiant planetJovian
By the IAU's definition, there are eight planets in the Solar System; four terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars) and four giant planets, which can be divided further into two gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) and two ice giants (Uranus and Neptune).

Terrestrial planet

terrestrial planetsrockyrocky planet
By the IAU's definition, there are eight planets in the Solar System; four terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars) and four giant planets, which can be divided further into two gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) and two ice giants (Uranus and Neptune).

Ice giant

ice giantsice giant planetice giant planets
By the IAU's definition, there are eight planets in the Solar System; four terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars) and four giant planets, which can be divided further into two gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) and two ice giants (Uranus and Neptune).

Earth

Earth's surfaceterrestrialworld

Ellipsoid

ellipsoidalellipsoidstriaxial
This is a list of gravitationally rounded objects of the Solar System, which are objects that have a rounded, ellipsoidal shape due to their own gravity (current or past hydrostatic equilibrium).

Dwarf planet

dwarf planetsList of dwarf planetsplanet
Their sizes range from former dwarf planets and moons to the planets and the Sun.

Natural satellite

moonmoonssatellite
Their sizes range from former dwarf planets and moons to the planets and the Sun.

Planet

planetsFormer classification of planetsplanemo
The 2006 International Astronomical Union (IAU) defines a planet as a body in orbit around the Sun that was large enough to have achieved hydrostatic equilibrium and to have "cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit". Their sizes range from former dwarf planets and moons to the planets and the Sun.

Sun

solarSolThe Sun
The 2006 International Astronomical Union (IAU) defines a planet as a body in orbit around the Sun that was large enough to have achieved hydrostatic equilibrium and to have "cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit". Their sizes range from former dwarf planets and moons to the planets and the Sun. The Sun is a G-type main-sequence star.

Galactic Center

Galactic Centregalactic corecenter
The Sun's orbital characteristics are listed in relation to the Galactic Center, while all other objects are listed in order of their distance from the Sun.

G-type main-sequence star

yellow dwarfG-type main sequence starG-type main sequence
The Sun is a G-type main-sequence star.

Mass

inertial massgravitational massweight
It contains almost 99.9% of all the mass in the Solar System.

Astronomical symbols

astronomical symbolastronomicalastronomy

Volume

volumetriccapacityOrders of magnitude (volume)