List of political parties in New Zealand

political party in New ZealandPolitical parties in New Zealandpolitical partiespolitical partyNew Zealandpartyregistered partiesAnthony George RavlichNew Zealand political partiesAnthony Ravlich
New Zealand national politics have featured a pervasive party system since the early-20th century.wikipedia
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New Zealand Labour Party

Labour PartyLabourLabour Government
Gradually, Liberal and Reform found themselves working together more often, mostly in opposition to the growing Labour Party.
The New Zealand Labour Party (Rōpū Reipa o Aotearoa), or simply Labour (Reipa), is a centre-left political party in New Zealand.

New Zealand National Party

National PartyNationalThe National Party
After Labour eventually won office in 1935, the Liberals (then known as the United Party) and Reform came together in 1936 to form the National Party.
The New Zealand National Party (Rōpū Nāhinara o Aotearoa), shortened to National (Nāhinara) or the Nats, is a centre-right political party in New Zealand.

Alliance (New Zealand political party)

AllianceAlliance PartyThe Alliance
Over the years, a number of "third parties" or so-called "minor parties" developed, notably the Social Credit Party, the New Zealand Party, the Values Party, and the Alliance.
The Alliance was a left-wing political party in New Zealand.

New Zealand First

NZ FirstNew Zealand First Party NZ First
New Zealand First (Aotearoa Tuatahi), commonly abbreviated to NZ First, is a nationalist and populist political party in New Zealand.

Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand

Green PartyGreensGreen
The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand (Rōpū Kākāriki o Aotearoa, Niu Tireni) is a left-wing political party in New Zealand.

ACT New Zealand

ACTACT PartyAssociation of Consumers and Taxpayers
ACT New Zealand, usually known as ACT, is a right-wing, classical-liberal political party in New Zealand.

New Conservative Party (New Zealand)

Conservative PartyConservative Party of New ZealandNew Conservative
New Conservative is a conservative political party in New Zealand.

NewLabour Party (New Zealand)

NewLabour PartyNewLabourNew Labour
The NewLabour Party was a centre-left political party in New Zealand that operated from 1989 to 2000.

United Future

United Future New ZealandUnited Future Party United Future
United Future New Zealand, usually known as United Future, was a centrist political party in New Zealand.

Jim Anderton's Progressive Party

Progressive PartyProgressiveProgressives
Jim Anderton's Progressive Party (formed in 2002 as the Progressive Party and renamed after its founder in 2005) was a New Zealand political party generally somewhat to the left of its ally, the Labour Party.

Republicanism in New Zealand

New Zealand republicrepublicanismconstitutionally remove British sovereignty
Three political parties currently with members in New Zealand's parliament have a policy of holding a binding referendum on the republic issue.

Socialism in New Zealand

socialist partiesNew ZealandNew Zealand socialism
Several prominent political parties in New Zealand, such as the New Zealand Labour Party, have historical links to socialism but are not generally considered socialist today due to their acceptance of a market economy.

Politics of New Zealand

New Zealand politicsNew Zealand GovernmentNew Zealand
The country has a multi-party system, though the dominant political parties in New Zealand have historically been the Labour Party and the National Party (or its predecessors).

The Civilian Party

Civilian Party
On 7 June 2013, The Civilian announced its intention to register a political party and to charge fifty cents as a membership fee.

Party system

party systemsGovernment by Partypartisan
New Zealand national politics have featured a pervasive party system since the early-20th century.

Two-party system

two party systemmajority partytwo major parties
While two "major" parties continue to dominate the New Zealand national political landscape, the country now more closely resembles a multi-party state since the introduction of proportional representation in 1996 – smaller parties can now reasonably expect to play a role in government.