List of proper names of stars

by constellationgiven a proper namein alphabetical orderList of traditional star namesmajority of proper namesnamenaming of stars and constellationsproper nameproper namesstar names
This is a list of proper names of stars.wikipedia
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IAU Working Group on Star Names

Working Group on Star NamesIAU-approved
This is a list of proper names of stars. These are the names of stars that have either been approved by the International Astronomical Union (its Working Group on Star Names has since 2016 been publishing a "List of IAU-approved Star Names", which as of June 2018 included a total of 330 proper names of stars ) or which have been in somewhat recent usage.
List of proper names of stars

International Astronomical Union

IAUInternational Astronomical Union (IAU)I.A.U.
This is a list of proper names of stars. These are the names of stars that have either been approved by the International Astronomical Union (its Working Group on Star Names has since 2016 been publishing a "List of IAU-approved Star Names", which as of June 2018 included a total of 330 proper names of stars ) or which have been in somewhat recent usage.
List of proper names of stars

Epsilon Eridani

ε Eridaniε EriEpsilon Erdani
Despite being a relatively bright star, it was not given a proper name by early astronomers.

List of Arabic star names

traditional star namesArabic and Persian namesArabic names now used for individual stars
List of Arabic star names
List of proper names of stars

Star, Russia

starstellarstars
This is a list of proper names of stars. These are the names of stars that have either been approved by the International Astronomical Union (its Working Group on Star Names has since 2016 been publishing a "List of IAU-approved Star Names", which as of June 2018 included a total of 330 proper names of stars ) or which have been in somewhat recent usage.

Lists of stars by constellation

star constellations
See also the lists of stars by constellation, which give variant names, derivations, and magnitudes.

Naked eye

naked-eyeunaided eyenaked human eye
Of the roughly 10,000 stars visible to the naked eye, only a few hundred have been given proper names in the history of astronomy.

Asterism (astronomy)

asterismasterismsconstellation
Traditional astronomy tends to group stars into asterisms, and give proper names to those, not to individual stars.

List of brightest stars

brightest starsbrightest starone of the brightest stars
Only a handful of the brightest stars have individual proper names not depending on their asterism; so Sirius "the scorcher", Antares and Canopus (of uncertain origin), Alphard "the solitary one", Regulus "kinglet"; and arguably Aldebaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades), Procyon "preceding the dog [Sirius]".

Sirius

SothisDog StarSirius B
Only a handful of the brightest stars have individual proper names not depending on their asterism; so Sirius "the scorcher", Antares and Canopus (of uncertain origin), Alphard "the solitary one", Regulus "kinglet"; and arguably Aldebaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades), Procyon "preceding the dog [Sirius]".

Antares

Antares Bα Scorpionisα
Only a handful of the brightest stars have individual proper names not depending on their asterism; so Sirius "the scorcher", Antares and Canopus (of uncertain origin), Alphard "the solitary one", Regulus "kinglet"; and arguably Aldebaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades), Procyon "preceding the dog [Sirius]".

Canopus

α Carinaea first magnitude starCanopean
Only a handful of the brightest stars have individual proper names not depending on their asterism; so Sirius "the scorcher", Antares and Canopus (of uncertain origin), Alphard "the solitary one", Regulus "kinglet"; and arguably Aldebaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades), Procyon "preceding the dog [Sirius]".

Alphard

α Hyaα Hydrae
Only a handful of the brightest stars have individual proper names not depending on their asterism; so Sirius "the scorcher", Antares and Canopus (of uncertain origin), Alphard "the solitary one", Regulus "kinglet"; and arguably Aldebaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades), Procyon "preceding the dog [Sirius]".

Regulus

Alpha LeonisRegulus Astar
Only a handful of the brightest stars have individual proper names not depending on their asterism; so Sirius "the scorcher", Antares and Canopus (of uncertain origin), Alphard "the solitary one", Regulus "kinglet"; and arguably Aldebaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades), Procyon "preceding the dog [Sirius]".

Aldebaran

Alpha Tauribrightest starRohini
Only a handful of the brightest stars have individual proper names not depending on their asterism; so Sirius "the scorcher", Antares and Canopus (of uncertain origin), Alphard "the solitary one", Regulus "kinglet"; and arguably Aldebaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades), Procyon "preceding the dog [Sirius]".

Pleiades

Pleiades star clusterM45the Pleiades
Only a handful of the brightest stars have individual proper names not depending on their asterism; so Sirius "the scorcher", Antares and Canopus (of uncertain origin), Alphard "the solitary one", Regulus "kinglet"; and arguably Aldebaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades), Procyon "preceding the dog [Sirius]".

Procyon

Canis minorProcyon Aα CMi
Only a handful of the brightest stars have individual proper names not depending on their asterism; so Sirius "the scorcher", Antares and Canopus (of uncertain origin), Alphard "the solitary one", Regulus "kinglet"; and arguably Aldebaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades), Procyon "preceding the dog [Sirius]".

Vega

2828Botercadentconstellation of Vega
The same holds for Chinese star names, where most stars are enumerated within their asterisms, with a handful of exceptions such as 織女 "weaving girl" (Vega).

Epsilon Carinae

Aviorε Carε Carinae
In addition to the limited number of traditional star names, there are some coined in modern times, e.g. "Avior" for Epsilon Carinae (1930), and a number of stars named after people (mostly in the 20th century).

Stars named after people

Van Biesbroeck's Star
In addition to the limited number of traditional star names, there are some coined in modern times, e.g. "Avior" for Epsilon Carinae (1930), and a number of stars named after people (mostly in the 20th century).

Star system

multiple star systemmultiple systemstriple star
The WGSN decided to attribute proper names to individual stars rather than entire multiple systems. For such names relating to members of multiple star systems, and where a component letter (from e.g. Washington Double Star Catalog) is not explicitly listed, the WGSN says that the name should be understood to be attributed to the brightest component by visual brightness.

Washington Double Star Catalog

WDSMultiple star catalogsWDS catalog
For such names relating to members of multiple star systems, and where a component letter (from e.g. Washington Double Star Catalog) is not explicitly listed, the WGSN says that the name should be understood to be attributed to the brightest component by visual brightness.