Literary nonsense

nonsensenonsensicalnonsense literatureliterature of nonsensenonsensnonsense poetrynonsense prosenonsense storiesnonsense versenonsense writing
Literary nonsense (or nonsense literature) is a broad categorization of literature that balances elements that make sense with some that do not, with the effect of subverting language conventions or logical reasoning.wikipedia
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Nonsense verse

nonsense poemnonsense poetrynonsense rhyme
Even though the most well-known form of literary nonsense is nonsense verse, the genre is present in many forms of literature.
Nonsense verse is a form of nonsense literature usually employing strong prosodic elements like rhythm and rhyme.

Edward Lear

LearEd LearJumblies Poem by Edward Lear
Though not the first to write this hybrid kind of nonsense, Edward Lear developed and popularized it in his many limericks (starting with A Book of Nonsense, 1846) and other famous texts such as The Owl and the Pussycat, The Dong with a Luminous Nose, The Jumblies and The Story of the Four Little Children Who Went Around the World.
Edward Lear (12 May 1812 – 29 January 1888) was an English artist, illustrator, musician, author and poet, and is known now mostly for his literary nonsense in poetry and prose and especially his limericks, a form he popularised.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice in WonderlandAliceWonderland
Lewis Carroll continued this trend, making literary nonsense a worldwide phenomenon with Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking-Glass (1871).
It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre.

Lewis Carroll

Carroll, LewisCharles Lutwidge DodgsonCarroll
Lewis Carroll continued this trend, making literary nonsense a worldwide phenomenon with Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking-Glass (1871).
The poems Jabberwocky and The Hunting of the Snark are classified in the genre of literary nonsense.

John Sandford (poet)

John SandfordJohn Sanford
Figures such as John Hoskyns, Henry Peacham, John Sandford, and John Taylor lived in the early seventeenth century and were noted nonsense authors in their time.
He was also a neo-Latin poet, and a founder of the tradition of literary nonsense under the pseudonym Glareanus Vadianus, a mocker of Thomas Coryat.

Limerick (poetry)

limericklimericksLimerick poetry
Though not the first to write this hybrid kind of nonsense, Edward Lear developed and popularized it in his many limericks (starting with A Book of Nonsense, 1846) and other famous texts such as The Owl and the Pussycat, The Dong with a Luminous Nose, The Jumblies and The Story of the Four Little Children Who Went Around the World.
(1872). Lear wrote 212 limericks, mostly considered nonsense literature.

Mervyn Peake

PeakeIt Makes a Change
Mervyn Peake
Peake also wrote poetry and literary nonsense in verse form, short stories for adults and children (Letters from a Lost Uncle), stage and radio plays, and Mr Pye, a relatively tightly-structured novel in which God implicitly mocks the evangelical pretensions and cosy world-view of the eponymous hero.

Laura E. Richards

Laura Elizabeth HoweLaura Elizabeth RichardsRichards, Laura
Laura E. Richards
One well-known children's poem is her literary nonsense verse "Eletelephony".

Frank Key

Hooting Yard on the Air
Frank Key
The Guardian's literature columnist Sam Jordison has described Frank Key as one of the most prolific living writers of literary nonsense.

Brian O'Nolan

Flann O'BrienBrian Ó NualláinFlann O’Brien
Nonsense was also an important element in the works of Flann O'Brien and Eugène Ionesco.
Indeed it can be seen as a pioneer of postmodernism, although the academic Keith Hopper has argued that The Third Policeman, superficially less radical, is actually a more deeply subversive and proto-postmodernist work, and as such, possibly a representation of literary nonsense.

Edward Gorey

Edward Gorey
Gorey classified his own work as literary nonsense, the genre made most famous by Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear.

Dave Eggers

David EggersDavid Egger
Dave Eggers
Other works include The Future Dictionary of America, Created in Darkness by Troubled Americans, and "Dr. and Mr. Haggis-On-Whey", all children's books of literary nonsense, which Eggers writes with his younger brother and uses as a pseudonym.

Spike Milligan

Oblomov
Spike Milligan
Milligan also wrote verse, considered to be within the genre of literary nonsense.

John Prentiss Benson

John Prentiss Benson
These were influenced by Edward Lear's literary nonsense, but took an even more fantastical angle.

Halfdan Rasmussen

Rasmussen
Halfdan Rasmussen (Danish)
He was known for his literary nonsense verse for children and his serious adult writings about social issues and human rights.

Christian Morgenstern

MorgensternMorgenstern, ChristianMorgenstern’s
Christian Morgenstern (German)
Morgenstern's poetry, much of which was inspired by English literary nonsense, is immensely popular, even though he enjoyed very little success during his lifetime.

John Lennon

LennonJohnJ. Lennon
John Lennon
Book Week reported, "This is nonsense writing, but one has only to review the literature of nonsense to see how well Lennon has brought it off. While some of his homonyms are gratuitous word play, many others have not only double meaning but a double edge."

Lennart Hellsing

Lennart Hellsing (Swedish)
He is considered an "outstanding poet" in the field of humour and nonsense writing.

Glen Baxter (cartoonist)

Glen Baxter
Glen Baxter's comic work is often nonsense, relying on the baffling interplay between word and image.
Glen Baxter (born 4 March 1944), nicknamed Colonel Baxter, is an English draughtsman and cartoonist, noted for his absurdist drawings and an overall effect often resembling literary nonsense.

Hugh Haughton

Haughton, Hugh
The Chatto Book of Nonsense Poetry, ed. Hugh Haughton. London: Chatto & Windus, 1988.
Hugh Haughton is an academic, author, editor and specialist in Irish literature and the literature of nonsense.

Zippy the Pinhead

Zippy
Zippy the Pinhead, by Bill Griffith, is an American strip that mixes philosophy, including what has been called "Heideggerian disruptions" and pop culture in its nonsensical processes.
The strip is unique among syndicated multi-panel dailies for its characteristics of literary nonsense, including a near-absence of either straightforward gags or continuous narrative, and for its unusually intricate artwork, which is reminiscent of the style of Griffith's 1970s underground comics.

Alastair Reid

Alastair Reid
Reid published more than forty books of poems, translations, and travel writing, including Ounce Dice Trice, a book of word-play and literary nonsense for children (illustrated by Ben Shahn), and two selections from his works: Outside In: Selected Prose and Inside Out: Selected Poetry and Translations (both 2008).

Alan Watts

WattsWatts, Alan W
Alan Watts
1967 Nonsense, illustrations by Greg Irons (a collection of literary nonsense), San Francisco: Stolen Paper Editions

Surreal humour

surreal humorsurrealsurreal comedy
Surreal humour
Many of Edward Lear's children stories and poems contain nonsense and are basically surreal in approach.