Litre

Lmlliterhlmilliliterlitreslitershectolitremillilitrehectoliters
The litre (international spelling) or liter (American spelling) (SI symbols L and l, other symbol used: ℓ) is a metric system unit of volume which is a non-SI unit mentioned in the SI.wikipedia
1,310 Related Articles

Metric system

metricmetric unitsmetric unit
The litre (international spelling) or liter (American spelling) (SI symbols L and l, other symbol used: ℓ) is a metric system unit of volume which is a non-SI unit mentioned in the SI. The original French metric system used the litre as a base unit. A litre is equal in volume to the millistere, an obsolete non-SI metric unit customarily used for dry measure.
The concept of coherence was only introduced into the metric system in the third quarter of the 19th century; in its original form the metric system was non-coherent—in particular the litre was 0.001 m 3 and the are (from which the hectare derives) was 100 m 2.

Kilogram

kgmgmilligram
One litre of liquid water has a mass of almost exactly one kilogram, because the kilogram was originally defined in 1795 as the mass of one cubic decimetre of water at the temperature of melting ice (0 °C).
The kilogram was originally defined in 1795 as the mass of one litre of water.

Volume

volumetriccapacityOrders of magnitude (volume)
The litre (international spelling) or liter (American spelling) (SI symbols L and l, other symbol used: ℓ) is a metric system unit of volume which is a non-SI unit mentioned in the SI.
The metric system also includes the litre (L) as a unit of volume, where one litre is the volume of a 10-centimetre cube.

SI base unit

base unitSI base unitsbase units
The original French metric system used the litre as a base unit.
A number of other units, such as the litre (US English: liter), astronomical unit and electronvolt, are not formally part of the SI, but are accepted for use with SI.

Non-SI units mentioned in the SI

accepted for use with SIAccepted for use with the SIaccepted unit
The litre (international spelling) or liter (American spelling) (SI symbols L and l, other symbol used: ℓ) is a metric system unit of volume which is a non-SI unit mentioned in the SI. The litre was also used in several subsequent versions of the metric system and is accepted for use with the SI, although not an SI unit—the SI unit of volume is the cubic metre (m 3 ).

Cubic centimetre

cccm −3 cm 3
It is equal to 1 cubic decimetre (dm 3 ), 1,000 cubic centimetres (cm 3 ) or 1/1,000 cubic metre.
One cubic centimetre corresponds to a volume of 1⁄1,000,000 of a cubic metre, or 1⁄1,000 of a litre, or one millilitre; thus, 1 cm 3 ≡ 1 mL.

Tonne

ttonnesmetric ton
Similarly: one millilitre (1 mL) of water has a mass of about 1 g; 1,000 litres of water has a mass of about 1,000 kg (1 tonne).
The tonne is derived from the mass of one cubic metre of pure water; at 4°C one thousand litres of pure water has an absolute mass of one tonne.

General Conference on Weights and Measures

CGPMConférence Générale des Poids et MesuresCGPM conference
Although the litre is not an SI unit, it is accepted by the CGPM (the standards body that defines the SI) for use with the SI.

Decimetre

dmdecimeterdecimetres
It is equal to 1 cubic decimetre (dm 3 ), 1,000 cubic centimetres (cm 3 ) or 1/1,000 cubic metre.
The common non-SI metric unit of volume, the litre, is defined as one cubic decimetre (however, from 1901 to 1964, there was a slight difference between the two due to the litre being defined with respect to the kilogram rather than the metre).

Pint

imperial pintpintspt
The imperial pint (≈ 568 ml) is used in the United Kingdom and Ireland and to a limited extent in Commonwealth nations.

Gallon

gallonsimperial gallonUS gallon
In these localities, it has been replaced as the unit of capacity by the litre.

Units of measurement in France before the French Revolution

piedFrenchFrench feet
The word litre is derived from an older French unit, the [[Units of measurement in France before the French Revolution#Volume – Dry measures|litron]], whose name came from Greek—where it was a unit of weight, not volume —via Latin, and which equalled approximately 0.831 litres.

Cubic metre

m 3 cubic metermillion cubic metre
It is equal to 1 cubic decimetre (dm 3 ), 1,000 cubic centimetres (cm 3 ) or 1/1,000 cubic metre. The litre was also used in several subsequent versions of the metric system and is accepted for use with the SI, although not an SI unit—the SI unit of volume is the cubic metre (m 3 ).

Metric prefix

SI prefixunit prefixprefix
The litre, though not an official SI unit, may be used with SI prefixes.
The litre (equal to a cubic decimetre), millilitre (equal to a cubic centimetre), microlitre, and smaller are common.

International System of Units

SISI unitsSI unit
The litre was also used in several subsequent versions of the metric system and is accepted for use with the SI, although not an SI unit—the SI unit of volume is the cubic metre (m 3 ).
The tonne, litre, and hectare were adopted by the CGPM in 1879 and have been retained as units that may be used alongside SI units, having been given unique symbols.

Quart

qtquartsUS quart
All are roughly equal to one metric litre.

Cubic inch

CIDcu inc.i.d.
The cubic inch and the cubic foot are still used as units of volume in the United States, although the common SI units of volume, the liter, milliliter, and cubic meter, are also used, especially in manufacturing and high technology.

Dry measure

dry volumedrydry capacity
A litre is equal in volume to the millistere, an obsolete non-SI metric unit customarily used for dry measure.
In the original metric system, the unit of dry volume was the stere, equal to a one-meter cube, but this is not part of the modern metric system; the liter and the cubic meter are now used.

American and British English spelling differences

spelling differencesorsee spelling differences
The spelling "liter" is predominantly used in American English.
Some initials are usually upper case in the US but lower case in the UK: liter/litre and its compounds (2 L or 25 mL vs 2 l or 25 ml); and ante meridiem and post meridiem (10 P.M. or 10 PM vs 10 p.m. or 10 pm).

Engine displacement

displacementcapacitydisplaced
The abbreviation "cc" is still commonly used in many fields including medical dosage and sizing for combustion engine displacement.
The common metric units for displacement are cubic centimetres (cc or cm 3 ) and litres (L), while the common imperial unit is cubic inches (CID or cu in).

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
In the UK and Ireland as well as the rest of Europe, lowercase l is used with prefixes, though whole litres are often written in full (so, "750 ml" on a wine bottle, but often "1 litre" on a juice carton).
According to the Environment Agency, total water abstraction for public water supply in the UK was 16,406 megalitres per day in 2007.

Integrated nanoliter system

The integrated nanoliter system is a measuring, separating, and mixing device that is able to measure fluids to the nanoliter, mix different fluids for a specific product, and separate a solution into simpler solutions.

Claude Émile Jean-Baptiste Litre

Claude Émile Jean-Baptiste Litre is a fictional character created in 1978 by Kenneth Woolner of the University of Waterloo to justify the use of a capital L to denote litres.