Liu An

Huai Nun TzuHuainanthe prince
Liú Ān (, c. 179–122 BC) was a Han dynasty Chinese prince and an advisor to his nephew, Emperor Wu of Han .wikipedia
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Huainanzi

Huai Nan ZiHuainan ZiMasters of Huainan
He is best known for editing the (139 BC) Huainanzi compendium of Daoist, Confucianist, Buddhist and Legalist teachings and for supposedly inventing tofu.
The Huainanzi is an ancient Chinese text that consists of a collection of essays that resulted from a series of scholarly debates held at the court of Liu An, Prince of Huainan, sometime before 139.

Tofu

bean curdbeancurdsilken tofu
He is best known for editing the (139 BC) Huainanzi compendium of Daoist, Confucianist, Buddhist and Legalist teachings and for supposedly inventing tofu.
Chinese legend ascribes its invention to Prince Liu An (179–122BC).

Emperor Wu of Han

Emperor WuWudiWu
Liú Ān (, c. 179–122 BC) was a Han dynasty Chinese prince and an advisor to his nephew, Emperor Wu of Han .
These enemies of Emperor Wu wished to replace him with his uncle Liu An, the King of Huainan, who was a renowned for his expertise in Taoist ideology.

Eight Immortals of Huainan

Eight Immortal Scholars of the Haneight scholars
Eight of these scholars in particular became known as the Eight Immortals of Huainan .
The Eight Immortals of Huainan, also known as the Eight Gentlemen (八公 bāgōng), were the eight scholars under the patronage of Liu An (劉安 Liú Ān), the prince of Huainan during the Western Han Dynasty.

History of geography

geographyHerodotus' time it was not generally known that Africa was surrounded by an ocean ancient geographers
Along with the earlier ShuJing (Classic of History) of the 5th century BC (Warring States era), this book provided further concrete information on geography, including descriptions of the topography of China.
This example can be seen in the 4th chapter of the Huainanzi (Book of the Master of Huainan), compiled under the editorship of Prince Liu An in 139 BC during the Han dynasty (202 BC – 202 AD).

Chu Ci

Songs of ChuVerses of ChuSongs of the South
One of the two major ancient Chinese poetry collections was the Chu ci, also known as The Songs of the South or The Songs of Chu (the other being the Shijing). The seminal poem of the collection is the "Li Sao", generally agreed to be by Qu Yuan.
Wang Yi's selections of certain specific verses to anthologize in the modern Chu Ci has remained standard since its publication, towards the end of the Han Dynasty.During the reign of Emperor Cheng, Liu Xiang apparently arranged and compiled the poems of Qu Yuan and Song Yu (working probably from an earlier compilation by Liu An), as well as those of Han poets including Wang Bao, Jia Yi, Yan Ji and Liu Xiang himself, into the Chu Ci anthology largely as it is known today.

Yuan You

The poem "Zhao yin shi" (Summons for a Recluse") is attributed to him and "Yuan You" ("Far-off Journey") shows many similarities to the work of the literary circle around Liu An.
Traditionally attributed to Qu Yuan, there is little likelihood that he is the actual author, and the imagery of the cosmos and of the beings and deities encountered during this vast trip are rather typical of the literary circle around the Han Dynasty Prince of Huainan, Liu An, according to David Hawkes.

Summons for a Recluse

Zhaoyinshi
Summons for a Recluse
(Hawkes, 2011 [1985]: 244) The actual poet is not known; but, Liu An or an associate are likely as authors.

Li Sao

LisaoSaoChu ''sao
One of the two major ancient Chinese poetry collections was the Chu ci, also known as The Songs of the South or The Songs of Chu (the other being the Shijing). The seminal poem of the collection is the "Li Sao", generally agreed to be by Qu Yuan.
Liu An

Liu Ling (Han dynasty)

Liu Ling
She was the daughter of Liu An, the King of Huainan, as well as a second cousin of Emperor Wu.

List of geographers

geographerGeographers
List of geographers
Liu An (China, 177-122 BC)

Prince of Huainan

Huainanprince
After his father died, he became the Prince of Huainan, the lands south of the Huai River, at the age of 16.
Liu An, engaged in political and cosmological arguments with Dong Zhongshu, founded an academy which compiled the Huainanzi.

Han dynasty

HanHan EmpireEastern Han dynasty
Liú Ān (, c. 179–122 BC) was a Han dynasty Chinese prince and an advisor to his nephew, Emperor Wu of Han .

Taoism

TaoistDaoistTaoists
He is best known for editing the (139 BC) Huainanzi compendium of Daoist, Confucianist, Buddhist and Legalist teachings and for supposedly inventing tofu.

Confucianism

ConfucianConfucianistConfucian philosophy
He is best known for editing the (139 BC) Huainanzi compendium of Daoist, Confucianist, Buddhist and Legalist teachings and for supposedly inventing tofu.

Buddhism

BuddhistBuddhistsBuddha
He is best known for editing the (139 BC) Huainanzi compendium of Daoist, Confucianist, Buddhist and Legalist teachings and for supposedly inventing tofu.

Legalism (Chinese philosophy)

LegalismLegalistLegalists
He is best known for editing the (139 BC) Huainanzi compendium of Daoist, Confucianist, Buddhist and Legalist teachings and for supposedly inventing tofu.

Xian (Taoism)

xianimmortalimmortals
Early texts represent Liu An in three ways: the "author-editor of a respected philosophical symposium", the "bumbling rebel who took his life to avoid arrest", and the successful Daoist adept who transformed into a xian and "rose into the air to escape prosecution for trumped-up charges of treason and flew to eternal life."

Emperor Gaozu of Han

Liu BangEmperor GaozuEmperor Gao
He was the grandson of Liu Bang, the founding emperor of the Han Dynasty.

Huai River

HuaiRiver Huaihe
After his father died, he became the Prince of Huainan, the lands south of the Huai River, at the age of 16.

Coup d'état

coupcoup d'etatmilitary coup
Liu Jian, son of Liu Buhai, having realized that both he and his father had little chance to be a marquess, became so resentful that he accused Liu An and Liu Qian of a coup attempt.

Suicide

suicidalcommitted suicidesuicides
Finally, in a fate similar to his father, Liu An committed suicide in 122 BC after his plot was revealed.

Laozi

Lao TzuLao-TzuLao Tse
This book is considered one of the cornerstones of Taoist philosophy, along with the works of Laozi and Zhuangzi.

Zhuangzi (book)

ZhuangziChuang TzuZhuang Zi
This book is considered one of the cornerstones of Taoist philosophy, along with the works of Laozi and Zhuangzi.

Book of Documents

Book of HistoryShang ShuShujing
Along with the earlier ShuJing (Classic of History) of the 5th century BC (Warring States era), this book provided further concrete information on geography, including descriptions of the topography of China.