Liuqiu (medieval)

LiuqiuLiu QiuLiúqiúoriginal Liuqiu
The Liuqiu or Lewchew of the Book of Sui and other medieval Chinese texts was a realm said to have existed in the East China Sea.wikipedia
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Book of Sui

Sui ShuSuishudynastic history of Sui
The Liuqiu or Lewchew of the Book of Sui and other medieval Chinese texts was a realm said to have existed in the East China Sea.

Dongyi

YiEastern Barbarians
The Book of Sui places the report on Liuqiu second to last within the chapter on "Eastern Barbarians" (Dongyi), following the report on Mohe and preceding the report on Wa (Japan).

Ryukyu Islands

RyukyusRyukyuNansei Shoto
It is variously identified with Taiwan Island, the Penghu or Pescadore Islands, and the Ryukyu Archipelago.
Its obscure description of Liuqiu is the source of a never-ending scholarly debate over what was referred to by the name Taiwan, Okinawa or both.

Liuqiu Island

Lamay IslandLiuqiuLiuqiu Township
The name Liuqiu, in intermittent use since the Ming Dynasty, also remains the official name for Xiaoliuqiu Island southwest of Taiwan.
The original Liuqiu appears in the Book of Sui and other medieval Chinese records as an island kingdom somewhere in the East China Sea.

East China Sea

EastEast ChinaChina Sea
The Liuqiu or Lewchew of the Book of Sui and other medieval Chinese texts was a realm said to have existed in the East China Sea.

Geography of Taiwan

FormosaTaiwanisland of Taiwan
It is variously identified with Taiwan Island, the Penghu or Pescadore Islands, and the Ryukyu Archipelago.

Penghu

PescadoresPenghu CountyPenghu Islands
It is variously identified with Taiwan Island, the Penghu or Pescadore Islands, and the Ryukyu Archipelago. In his Daoyi Zhilüe (1349), Wang Dayuan clearly used "Liuqiu" as a name for Taiwan or the part of it near to Penghu.

Mohe people

MoheMalgalBaishan Mohe
The Book of Sui places the report on Liuqiu second to last within the chapter on "Eastern Barbarians" (Dongyi), following the report on Mohe and preceding the report on Wa (Japan).

Wa (Japan)

WaWaeWo
The Book of Sui places the report on Liuqiu second to last within the chapter on "Eastern Barbarians" (Dongyi), following the report on Mohe and preceding the report on Wa (Japan).

History of Yuan

YuanshiYuan shiBook of Yuan
There is no scholarly consensus on what specific territory "Liuqiu" refers to in the Book of Sui and History of Yuan.

Daoyi Zhilüe

Dao Yi Zhi LueDaoyi ZhilueDaoyi Zhilüe Guangzheng Xia
In his Daoyi Zhilüe (1349), Wang Dayuan clearly used "Liuqiu" as a name for Taiwan or the part of it near to Penghu.

Wang Dayuan

Wang Ta-Yuan
In his Daoyi Zhilüe (1349), Wang Dayuan clearly used "Liuqiu" as a name for Taiwan or the part of it near to Penghu.

Shō Hashi

HashiKingShō Taikyū's father
After Shō Hashi unified the three kingdoms on Okinawa, the Yongle Emperor gave him the title "King of Liuqiu" in 1428.

Yongle Emperor

Zhu DiYongleYongle era
After Shō Hashi unified the three kingdoms on Okinawa, the Yongle Emperor gave him the title "King of Liuqiu" in 1428.

Early modern period

early moderncolonial eraearly modern era
Early modern Chinese sources also specifically called Okinawa (the largest of the Ryukyus) as "Greater Liuqiu" and Taiwan Island as the "Lesser Liuqiu".

Okinawa Prefecture

OkinawaOkinawanOkinawa, Japan
Early modern Chinese sources also specifically called Okinawa (the largest of the Ryukyus) as "Greater Liuqiu" and Taiwan Island as the "Lesser Liuqiu".

Taiwan

Republic of ChinaFormosaRepublic of China (Taiwan)
In his Daoyi Zhilüe (1349), Wang Dayuan used "Liuqiu" as a name for the island of Taiwan, or the part of it closest to Penghu.

Ryukyuan people

RyukyuanRyukyuansOkinawan
Their usual ethnic name derives from the Chinese name for the islands, "Liuqiu" (also spelled as Loo Choo, Lew Chew, Luchu, and more ), which in the Japanese language is pronounced "Ryukyu".

History of Taiwan

Taiwanese historydemocratic reformsDemocratization of Taiwan
The Book of Sui relates that Emperor Yang of the Sui dynasty sent three expeditions to a place called "Liuqiu" early in the 7th century.

Human placentophagy

ate her own placentaplacenta may be eaten
A sixteenth-century Chinese medical text, the Compendium of Materia Medica, states in a section on medical uses of the placenta that, "when a woman in Liuqiu has a baby, the placenta is eaten", and that in Bagui, "the placenta of a boy is specially prepared and eaten by the mother’s family and relatives."

List of tributary states of China

List of tributaries of Imperial ChinaList of tributaries of Chinatributary