Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects

Lives of the ArtistsViteLivesLe Vite delle più eccellenti pittori, scultori, ed architettoriThe Lives of the ArtistsLives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors, and ArchitectsLives of the PaintersVitaLe ViteThe Lives
The Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects (Le vite de' più eccellenti pittori, scultori, e architettori), also known as The Lives (Le Vite), is a series of artist biographies written by 16th-century Italian painter and architect Giorgio Vasari, which is considered "perhaps the most famous, and even today the most-read work of the older literature of art", "some of the Italian Renaissance's most influential writing on art", and "the first important book on art history".wikipedia
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Italian Renaissance

Renaissance ItalyRenaissanceFlorentine Renaissance
The Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects (Le vite de' più eccellenti pittori, scultori, e architettori), also known as The Lives (Le Vite), is a series of artist biographies written by 16th-century Italian painter and architect Giorgio Vasari, which is considered "perhaps the most famous, and even today the most-read work of the older literature of art", "some of the Italian Renaissance's most influential writing on art", and "the first important book on art history".
The Renaissance author Giorgio Vasari used the term "Rebirth" in his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects but the concept became widespread only in the 19th century, after the works of scholars such as Jules Michelet and Jacob Burckhardt.

Giorgio Vasari

VasariVasari, GiorgioVasari, G
The Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects (Le vite de' più eccellenti pittori, scultori, e architettori), also known as The Lives (Le Vite), is a series of artist biographies written by 16th-century Italian painter and architect Giorgio Vasari, which is considered "perhaps the most famous, and even today the most-read work of the older literature of art", "some of the Italian Renaissance's most influential writing on art", and "the first important book on art history".
Giorgio Vasari (, also, ; 30 July 1511 – 27 June 1574) was an Italian painter, architect, writer, and historian, most famous today for his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, considered the ideological foundation of art-historical writing.

Renaissance

the RenaissanceEarly RenaissanceEuropean Renaissance
For centuries, it has been the most important source of information on Early Renaissance Italian (and especially Tuscan) painters and the attribution of their paintings.
The term rinascita ('rebirth') first appeared in Giorgio Vasari's Lives of the Artists (c.

Giotto

Giotto di BondoneGiottesqueGiotto Baroncelli
Others are generic fictions, such as the tale of young Giotto painting a fly on the surface of a painting by Cimabue that the older master repeatedly tried to brush away, a genre tale that echoes anecdotes told of the Greek painter Apelles.
In his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, Giorgio Vasari described Giotto as making a decisive break with the prevalent Byzantine style and as initiating "the great art of painting as we know it today, introducing the technique of drawing accurately from life, which had been neglected for more than two hundred years".

Cimabue

Giovanni Cimabue
Others are generic fictions, such as the tale of young Giotto painting a fly on the surface of a painting by Cimabue that the older master repeatedly tried to brush away, a genre tale that echoes anecdotes told of the Greek painter Apelles.
One source that recounts his career is Vasari's Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, but its accuracy is uncertain.

Venetian Renaissance

Venetian art
Venetian art in particular, let alone other parts of Europe, is systematically ignored.
The rest of Italy tended to ignore or underestimate Venetian painting; Giorgio Vasari's neglect of the school in the first edition of his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects in 1550 was so conspicuous that he realized he needed to visit Venice for extra material in his second edition of 1568.

Paolo Uccello

Paolo UcelloUccelloUcello
In his book Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects Giorgio Vasari wrote that Uccello was obsessed by his interest in perspective and would stay up all night in his study trying to grasp the exact vanishing point.

Fra Angelico

Beato AngelicoAngelicoBlessed Fra Angelico
1395 – February 18, 1455) was an Italian painter of the Early Renaissance, described by Vasari in his Lives of the Artists as having "a rare and perfect talent".

Leon Battista Alberti

AlbertiLeone Battista AlbertiAlbertian
Alberti's life was described in Giorgio Vasari's ''Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects.

William Aglionby

Aglionby
In England, Aglionby's Painting Illustrated from 1685 was largely based on Vasari as well.
Aglionby used Giorgio Vasari's Lives, but selectively, and imposing his own views.

Bonanno Pisano

BonannoBonanno da Pisa
Giorgio Vasari wrongly attributed the realization of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to him in his Vite.

Filippo Baldinucci

BaldinucciBaldinucci, Filippo
In Florence the biographies of artists were revised and implemented in the late 17th century by Filippo Baldinucci.
From this grew his Notizie, in which he consciously intended to build upon the Vite of Giorgio Vasari; Baldinucci's was the first art history to trace the lives and work of artists not only of one region (Vasari was prejudiced towards Tuscan artists) but all Italy, and indeed beyond.

Filippo Lippi

Fra Filippo LippiFra Lippo LippiLippo Lippi
In his Lives of the Artists, Vasari says about Lippi: "Instead of studying, he spent all his time scrawling pictures on his own books and those of others."

Ambrogio Lorenzetti

AmbrogioLorenzettiLorenzetti, Ambrogio
Giorgio Vasari includes a biography of Lorenzetti in his Lives.

Stefano Fiorentino

Stefano
Born in Florence, he is mentioned in numerous literary sources, most notably the Lives of the Artists by Giorgio Vasari; other writers in whose works he appears include Franco Sacchetti and Filippo Villani.

Agnolo Gaddi

Agnolo
Giorgio Vasari included a biography of Agnolo Gaddi in his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects.

Margaritone d'Arezzo

MargaritoneMargaritone d’Arezzo
Outside Italy, his fame rests mainly on his entry in Giorgio Vasari's The Lives of the Artists.

Karel van Mander

Carel van ManderMander, Karel vanVan Mander
Karel Van Mander was probably the first Vasarian author with his Painting book (Het Schilderboeck, 1604), which encompassed not only the first Dutch translation of Vasari, but also the first Dutch translation of Ovid and was accompanied by a list of Italian painters who appeared on the scene after Vasari, and the first comprehensive list of biographies of painters from the Low Countries.
During his travels and stay in Italy, van Mander had read and was influenced by Giorgio Vasari's famous biographical accounts of painters in his book Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, often referred to as the Vite.

Ercole de' Roberti

Ercole dei RobertiErcole de RobertiErcole de ‘Roberti
He was profiled in Vasari's Le Vite delle più eccellenti pittori, scultori, ed architettori.

Michelozzo

Michelozzo MichelozziMichelozzo di BartolomeoMichelozzo di Bartolommeo
Michelozzo enjoyed a close relationship to Cosimo dei Medici throughout his life, and according to Giorgio Vasari in The Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, from Cimabue to Our Times, was motivated by his great love and fidelity for Cosimo to accompany him into exile in Venice from 1433 to 1434.

Vecchietta

Il VecchiettaLorenzo di Pietro (Vecchietta)Lorenzo di Pietro, "il Vecchietta
He is among the artists profiled in Vasari's Le Vite delle più eccellenti pittori, scultori, ed architettori.

Paolo Romano

Paolo di Mariano di Tuccio Taccone
Giorgio Vasari in his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects recounts that Paolo Romano was a modest man whose sculpture was far superior to that of his boastful contemporary Mino del Reame.

Arnolfo di Cambio

Arnolfo di Lapo
Giorgio Vasari included a biography of Arnolfo in his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects.

Bartolomeo Montagna

MontagnaBartolommeo Montagnahis father
He was mentioned in Vasari's Lives as a student of Andrea Mantegna but this is widely contested by art historians.