Living Planet Report

The Living Planet Report is published every two years by the World Wide Fund for Nature since 1998.wikipedia
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World Wide Fund for Nature

WWFWorld Wildlife FundWorld Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)
The Living Planet Report is published every two years by the World Wide Fund for Nature since 1998.
The Living Planet Report is published every two years by WWF since 1998; it is based on a Living Planet Index and ecological footprint calculation.

Living Planet Index

Living Planet ReportLPI
It is based on the Living Planet Index and ecological footprint calculations.
Results are presented biennially in the WWF Living Planet Report and in publications such as the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and the UN Global Biodiversity Outlook.

Ecological footprint

environmental footprintfootprintecological footprints
It is based on the Living Planet Index and ecological footprint calculations.

Convention on Biological Diversity

CBDBiodiversityBiodiversity Treaty
The 2018 report calls for new goals post-2020 alongside those of the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Paris Climate Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Paris Agreement

Paris Climate AgreementParis climate accordParis Climate Accords
The 2018 report calls for new goals post-2020 alongside those of the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Paris Climate Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Sustainable Development Goals

2030 Agenda for Sustainable DevelopmentSustainable Development GoalSustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
The 2018 report calls for new goals post-2020 alongside those of the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Paris Climate Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Human overpopulation

overpopulationexpanding human populationoverpopulated
In 2006, WWF's "Living Planet Report" stated that in order for all humans to live with the current consumption patterns of Europeans, we would be spending three times more than what the planet can renew.

Conservation biology

conservationconservationistconservation biologist
The WWF publishes its Living Planet Report and provides a global index of biodiversity by monitoring approximately 5,000 populations in 1,686 species of vertebrate (mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians) and report on the trends in much the same way that the stock market is tracked.

Holocene extinction

extinctmass species extinctionsixth mass extinction
According to the WWF's 2016 Living Planet Report, global wildlife populations have declined 58% since 1970, primarily due to habitat destruction, over-hunting and pollution.