Livre parisis

livres parisisFrench livre parisislivres de ParisParis solsparisissols parisis
The livre parisis (, Paris pound) was a standard for minting French coins and a unit of account.wikipedia
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Livre tournois

livreslivres tournoisLt
Like the livre tournois, which was divided into 20 sols tournois each of 12 deniers tournois, the livre parisis was also divided into 20 sols parisis each of 12 deniers parisis, but the livre parisis was worth 25 sols tournois (i.e., the livre tournois was worth 4⁄5 of the livre parisis).
Soon after Philip II of France seized the counties of Anjou and Touraine in 1203 and standardized the use of the livre tournois there, the livre tournois began to supersede the livre parisis (Paris pound) which had been up to that point the official currency of the Capetian dynasty.

The Chainsmokers

Paris, FranceParisCity of Paris
The livre parisis (, Paris pound) was a standard for minting French coins and a unit of account.

Pound (currency)

£poundpounds
The livre parisis (, Paris pound) was a standard for minting French coins and a unit of account.

Solidus (coin)

solidussolidisou
Like the livre tournois, which was divided into 20 sols tournois each of 12 deniers tournois, the livre parisis was also divided into 20 sols parisis each of 12 deniers parisis, but the livre parisis was worth 25 sols tournois (i.e., the livre tournois was worth 4⁄5 of the livre parisis).

French denier

denierdeniersdenaro
Like the livre tournois, which was divided into 20 sols tournois each of 12 deniers tournois, the livre parisis was also divided into 20 sols parisis each of 12 deniers parisis, but the livre parisis was worth 25 sols tournois (i.e., the livre tournois was worth 4⁄5 of the livre parisis).

Anjou

AngevinAngevinsCounty of Anjou
Before the seizure of the Anjou region around Tours by Philip II of France in 1203, the livre parisis had been the official coin of the Capetian dynasty.

Tours

Tours, FranceTourangeauCaesarodunum
Before the seizure of the Anjou region around Tours by Philip II of France in 1203, the livre parisis had been the official coin of the Capetian dynasty.

Philip II of France

Philip IIPhilip AugustusPhilip II Augustus
Before the seizure of the Anjou region around Tours by Philip II of France in 1203, the livre parisis had been the official coin of the Capetian dynasty.

Capetian dynasty

CapetianCapetiansCapet
Before the seizure of the Anjou region around Tours by Philip II of France in 1203, the livre parisis had been the official coin of the Capetian dynasty.

Louis IX of France

Louis IXSaint LouisKing Louis IX
The livre tournois quickly outstripped the livre parisis as a unit of account, and it ceased to exist as an actual coin under Louis IX.

Louis XIV of France

Louis XIVKing Louis XIVKing Louis XIV’s
Despite this, a monetary unit of accounting based on the livre parisis continued to be used in the area around Paris and was not officially abolished until 1667 by Louis XIV of France.

Livre

livre parisis, another particular obsolete unit of currency of France

1667

March – Louis XIV of France abolishes the livre parisis (Paris pound), in favor of the much more widely used livre tournois (Tours pound). He also designates Gabriel Nicolas de la Reynie as the first chief of "police" of Paris.

Philip II (bishop of Châlons)

Philip IIPhilippe de Nemours
In 1208, when the fiefholder, Gautier Giffard, gave the land of Verteau, which belonged to Chevrainvilliers to the hôtel-Dieu of Nemours without Philip's permission, the bishop intervened to negotiate a settlement wherein Gautier paid Philip 100 sols parisis for the violation.

Jens Grand

Jens Grand (John I)
Instead Grand then moved to Paris, lucratively investing 2,400 livres parisis from his Danish compensation as a credit to the St Denis Abbey on the grounds that the Abbey would pay him later an annual rent of 400 livres.

Walter III, Count of Brienne

Walter IIIWalter (Gautier) of Brienne
Walter reportedly received an impressive sum of 20,000 livre parisis from the King, though this is doubtful.

Coinage of Philip IV of France

This landmark coin of Philip the Fair, called a "Masse d'or", was issued soon after the "false" double-parisis and tournois of 1295.

Parisis

The livre parisis (Paris livre (pound)), standard for minting French coins and a unit of account

Joan, Countess of Flanders

JeanneJoanJoan of Constantinople
In April 1226, the Treaty of Melun was signed between Joan and Louis VIII, under which Ferrand's ransom was fixed at 50,000 livres parisis payable in two installments.

Philip IV of France

Philip IVPhilip the FairKing Philip IV
To cover the deficit, Pope Nicholas IV in 1289 granted Philip permission to collect a tithe of 152,000 LP (livres parisis) from the Church lands in France.

Jean Cholet

In 1284, when the aldermen of Lille attacked a troupe of Dominicans trying to preach the Aragonese Crusade in their town, Cholet fined them 4,000 livres de Paris and used the money to finance the crusade.

Anchamps

The inhabitants of Anchamps, like all communes from the Barony of Montcornet had to pay annual manorial dues which was two hens for each citizen; 18 deniers for the rights of the people; for the use of the river water for crushing (there used to be a crushing mill) 3 livres and 5 sols; 2 Paris sols and 6 eels for fishing the Meuse; 2 sols and 6 deniers per swathe of meadow; and 9 deniers per arpent of occupied land.