Lo!

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Charles Fort

ForteanForteanaanomalous phenomena
Lo! was the third published nonfiction work of the author Charles Fort (first edition 1931).
These are: The Book of the Damned (1919), New Lands (1923), Lo! (1931) and Wild Talents (1932); one book was written between New Lands and Lo! but it was abandoned and absorbed into Lo!.

Wild Talents

He would later expand this theory to include purported mental and psychic phenomena in his fourth and final book, Wild Talents.
As did his previous book, Lo!, Wild Talents deals with a wide range of phenomena.

The Book of the Damned

Book of the Damned
The book also deals extensively with other subjects, including paranormal phenomena (see parapsychology), which were explored in his first book, The Book of the Damned. Fort started the book largely where he left off in The Book of the Damned: mysterious falls of animals and strange materials, flying stones, poltergeist activity, etc., and incorporated these strange phenomena into his new theory on teleportation, saying that teleportation from the Super-Sargasso Sea can explain these phenomena.
This is a theme that Fort would develop more in his later works, New Lands and Lo! particularly.

Teleportation

teleportteleportingteleporter
Fort is widely credited with having coined the now-popular term "teleportation" in this book, and here he ties his previous statements on what he referred to as the Super-Sargasso Sea into his beliefs on teleportation.
Fort's first formal use of the word occurred in the second chapter of his 1931 book Lo!:

Chasing Vermeer

Lo! is used extensively in Blue Balliett's book Chasing Vermeer.
Petra also finds a used book called Lo!, written by Charles Fort, at the local Powell's Books, owned by a man named Mr. Watch.

Benjamin Bathurst (diplomat)

Benjamin BathurstBathurst
Fort also briefly touched on UFOs again in this book, and wrote extensively on a number of other topics which he felt can be explained by teleportation: cryptozoology (including the Jersey Devil and various out of place animals), animal mutilations and attacks on people, strange swarming of balls, the appearance of various strange people from nowhere (the famous cases of Princess Caraboo and Kaspar Hauser), and the mysterious disappearances of others (including the diplomat Benjamin Bathurst, and vessels such as the Mary Celeste, Carroll A. Deering, and, presaging later interest in the Bermuda Triangle phenomenon).
Bathurst's case is mentioned by Charles Fort in his book Lo!.

Carroll A. Deering

Fort also briefly touched on UFOs again in this book, and wrote extensively on a number of other topics which he felt can be explained by teleportation: cryptozoology (including the Jersey Devil and various out of place animals), animal mutilations and attacks on people, strange swarming of balls, the appearance of various strange people from nowhere (the famous cases of Princess Caraboo and Kaspar Hauser), and the mysterious disappearances of others (including the diplomat Benjamin Bathurst, and vessels such as the Mary Celeste, Carroll A. Deering, and, presaging later interest in the Bermuda Triangle phenomenon).

Nonfiction

non-fictionnon-fiction bookNon Fiction
Lo! was the third published nonfiction work of the author Charles Fort (first edition 1931).

Cosmology

cosmologistcosmologicalcosmologies
In the final chapter of the book he proposes a new cosmology that the earth is stationary in space and surrounded by a solid shell which is (in the book's final words) "... not unthinkably far away."

Astronomy

astronomicalastronomerastronomers
Of Fort's four books, this volume deals most frequently and scathingly with astronomy (continuing from his previous book New Lands).

New Lands

Of Fort's four books, this volume deals most frequently and scathingly with astronomy (continuing from his previous book New Lands).

Parapsychology

parapsychologistparapsychologicalpsychical research
The book also deals extensively with other subjects, including paranormal phenomena (see parapsychology), which were explored in his first book, The Book of the Damned.

Super-Sargasso Sea

Fort is widely credited with having coined the now-popular term "teleportation" in this book, and here he ties his previous statements on what he referred to as the Super-Sargasso Sea into his beliefs on teleportation.

Psychic

psychicspsychic phenomenapsychical
He would later expand this theory to include purported mental and psychic phenomena in his fourth and final book, Wild Talents.

Astronomer

astronomersastrophysicistprofessional astronomers
It takes its derisive title from what he regarded as the tendency of astronomers to make positivistic, overly precise, and premature announcements of celestial events and discoveries.

Positivism

positivistpositivisticpositivists
It takes its derisive title from what he regarded as the tendency of astronomers to make positivistic, overly precise, and premature announcements of celestial events and discoveries.

Sky

celestialskiesheavens
It takes its derisive title from what he regarded as the tendency of astronomers to make positivistic, overly precise, and premature announcements of celestial events and discoveries.

Prophet

prophetsprophetessseer
Fort portrays them as quack prophets, sententiously pointing towards the skies and saying "Lo!"—inaccurately, as it turn out.

Thesis statement

thesis
Fort established his thesis for this particular book early on—that some sort of mysterious force, known as the "cosmic joker" (in his words), is responsible for the teleportation of people, animals, and materials.

Trickster

trickster godtrickerytricksters
Fort established his thesis for this particular book early on—that some sort of mysterious force, known as the "cosmic joker" (in his words), is responsible for the teleportation of people, animals, and materials.

Poltergeist

poltergeistsGuy William Lambertpoltergiest
Fort started the book largely where he left off in The Book of the Damned: mysterious falls of animals and strange materials, flying stones, poltergeist activity, etc., and incorporated these strange phenomena into his new theory on teleportation, saying that teleportation from the Super-Sargasso Sea can explain these phenomena.

Unidentified flying object

UFOUFOsunidentified flying objects
Fort also briefly touched on UFOs again in this book, and wrote extensively on a number of other topics which he felt can be explained by teleportation: cryptozoology (including the Jersey Devil and various out of place animals), animal mutilations and attacks on people, strange swarming of balls, the appearance of various strange people from nowhere (the famous cases of Princess Caraboo and Kaspar Hauser), and the mysterious disappearances of others (including the diplomat Benjamin Bathurst, and vessels such as the Mary Celeste, Carroll A. Deering, and, presaging later interest in the Bermuda Triangle phenomenon).

Cryptozoology

cryptozoologistcryptozoologicalcryptozoologists
Fort also briefly touched on UFOs again in this book, and wrote extensively on a number of other topics which he felt can be explained by teleportation: cryptozoology (including the Jersey Devil and various out of place animals), animal mutilations and attacks on people, strange swarming of balls, the appearance of various strange people from nowhere (the famous cases of Princess Caraboo and Kaspar Hauser), and the mysterious disappearances of others (including the diplomat Benjamin Bathurst, and vessels such as the Mary Celeste, Carroll A. Deering, and, presaging later interest in the Bermuda Triangle phenomenon).

Jersey Devil

New Jersey DevilOtherworldly AnimalsThe Jersey Devil
Fort also briefly touched on UFOs again in this book, and wrote extensively on a number of other topics which he felt can be explained by teleportation: cryptozoology (including the Jersey Devil and various out of place animals), animal mutilations and attacks on people, strange swarming of balls, the appearance of various strange people from nowhere (the famous cases of Princess Caraboo and Kaspar Hauser), and the mysterious disappearances of others (including the diplomat Benjamin Bathurst, and vessels such as the Mary Celeste, Carroll A. Deering, and, presaging later interest in the Bermuda Triangle phenomenon).

Princess Caraboo

fact-basedMary BakerMary Baker (née Willcocks)
Fort also briefly touched on UFOs again in this book, and wrote extensively on a number of other topics which he felt can be explained by teleportation: cryptozoology (including the Jersey Devil and various out of place animals), animal mutilations and attacks on people, strange swarming of balls, the appearance of various strange people from nowhere (the famous cases of Princess Caraboo and Kaspar Hauser), and the mysterious disappearances of others (including the diplomat Benjamin Bathurst, and vessels such as the Mary Celeste, Carroll A. Deering, and, presaging later interest in the Bermuda Triangle phenomenon).