Loaded question

Fallacy of many questionsWhen did you stop beating your wife?biaseddisguised a loaded assumptionLoaded question: Historical exampleloaded questionsquestiontrick
A loaded question or complex question fallacy is a question that contains a controversial or unjustified assumption (e.g., a presumption of guilt).wikipedia
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Question

answerwh-questionquestions
A loaded question or complex question fallacy is a question that contains a controversial or unjustified assumption (e.g., a presumption of guilt).
Pre-suppositional or loaded questions, such as "Have you stopped beating your wife?"

Evasion (ethics)

evadeevasiondodging
However, the asker is likely to respond by accusing the one who answers of dodging the question.
A false accusation of question dodging can sometimes be made as a disingenuous tactic in debate, in the informal fallacy of the loaded question.

Madeleine Albright

AlbrightMadeleine K. AlbrightAlbright, Madeleine
Madeleine Albright (U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.) fell into a trap of answering a loaded question (and later regretted not challenging it instead) on 60 Minutes on 12 May 1996.
Albright later criticized Stahl's segment as "amount[ing] to Iraqi propaganda"; said that her question was a loaded question; wrote "I had fallen into a trap and said something I did not mean"; and regretted coming "across as cold-blooded and cruel".

Complex question

trick questionfallacy of many questionsleading questions
Thus, these facts are presupposed by the question, and in this case an entrapment, because it narrows the respondent to a single answer, and the fallacy of many questions has been committed.
When a complex question contains controversial presuppositions (often with loaded language – having an unspoken and often emotive implication), it is known as a loaded question.

False dilemma

false dichotomyblack and white thinkingfalse dichotomies
False dilemma
Loaded question

Leading question

leading questionsleadingquestions biased
Leading question
Leading questions are distinct from loaded questions, which are objectionable because they contain implicit assumptions (such as "Have you stopped beating your wife?"

Sanctions against Iraq

sanctionseconomic sanctionseconomic sanctions against Iraq
Lesley Stahl asked, regarding the effects of UN sanctions against Iraq, "We have heard that a half million children have died. I mean, that is more children than died in Hiroshima. And, you know, is the price worth it?"
She criticized Stahl's segment as "amount[ing] to Iraqi propaganda"; said that her question was a loaded question; wrote "I had fallen into a trap and said something I did not mean"; and regretted coming "across as cold-blooded and cruel".

Lesley Stahl

Lesley Stahl asked, regarding the effects of UN sanctions against Iraq, "We have heard that a half million children have died. I mean, that is more children than died in Hiroshima. And, you know, is the price worth it?"
Loaded question: Historical example

List of fallacies

fallaciousLogical fallaciesReasoning errors
List of fallacies
Fallacy of many questions (complex question, fallacy of presuppositions, loaded question, plurium interrogationum) – someone asks a question that presupposes something that has not been proven or accepted by all the people involved. This fallacy is often used rhetorically so that the question limits direct replies to those that serve the questioner's agenda.

Entailment (linguistics)

entailmententailsimplication
Entailment (pragmatics)
Loaded question

Mu (negative)

muwu
Mu (negative)
A layperson's example of this concept is often invoked by the loaded question "Have you stopped beating your wife?", to which "mu" would be the only respectable response.

Presupposition

presuppositionspresupposeassumptions
Thus, these facts are presupposed by the question, and in this case an entrapment, because it narrows the respondent to a single answer, and the fallacy of many questions has been committed.
Loaded question

Suggestive question

leading questions
Suggestive question
Loaded question

Tacit assumption

implicit assumptionassumedassumption
A loaded question or complex question fallacy is a question that contains a controversial or unjustified assumption (e.g., a presumption of guilt).

Fallacy

informal fallacyfallaciesSophists
A loaded question or complex question fallacy is a question that contains a controversial or unjustified assumption (e.g., a presumption of guilt). Aside from being an informal fallacy depending on usage, such questions may be used as a rhetorical tool: the question attempts to limit direct replies to be those that serve the questioner's agenda.

Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetoricalrhetor
Aside from being an informal fallacy depending on usage, such questions may be used as a rhetorical tool: the question attempts to limit direct replies to be those that serve the questioner's agenda.

Begging the question

begs the questionbeg the questioncircular reasoning
This fallacy should be distinguished from that of begging the question, which offers a premise whose plausibility depends on the truth of the proposition asked about, and which is often an implicit restatement of the proposition.

Premise

connectedhypotheseslogical premises
This fallacy should be distinguished from that of begging the question, which offers a premise whose plausibility depends on the truth of the proposition asked about, and which is often an implicit restatement of the proposition.

Proposition

propositionspropositionalclaim
This fallacy should be distinguished from that of begging the question, which offers a premise whose plausibility depends on the truth of the proposition asked about, and which is often an implicit restatement of the proposition.

United States Ambassador to the United Nations

Ambassador to the United NationsU.S. Ambassador to the United NationsUN Ambassador
Madeleine Albright (U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.) fell into a trap of answering a loaded question (and later regretted not challenging it instead) on 60 Minutes on 12 May 1996.

60 Minutes

CBS 60 Minutes60 Minutes II60 Minutes report on the Benghazi Attack
Madeleine Albright (U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.) fell into a trap of answering a loaded question (and later regretted not challenging it instead) on 60 Minutes on 12 May 1996.

2009 New Zealand citizens-initiated referendum

2009 corporal punishment referendum2009 referendumcitizens-initiated referendum
For another example, the 2009 referendum on corporal punishment in New Zealand asked: "Should a smack as part of good parental correction be a criminal offence in New Zealand?"

Better Know a District

Better Know a LobbyBetter Know a Protectorate
One comedic maneuver that Colbert commonly employed in these interviews, particularly when he interviewed Democrats, was to ask the Representative a loaded question of either "George W. Bush: great President, or the greatest President?", or "the Iraq War: great war, or the greatest war?"