Local average treatment effect

local average treatment effectsone-sided
The local average treatment effect (LATE), also known as the complier average causal effect (CACE), was first introduced into the econometrics literature by Guido W. Imbens and Joshua D. Angrist in 1994.wikipedia
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Joshua Angrist

AngristJoshua D. Angrist
The local average treatment effect (LATE), also known as the complier average causal effect (CACE), was first introduced into the econometrics literature by Guido W. Imbens and Joshua D. Angrist in 1994.
Together with Guido Imbens, he developed the concept of local average treatment effects and showed how to identify and to estimate them, and how to use 2SLS to estimate the average causal effect of variable treatments.

Instrumental variables estimation

instrumental variableinstrumental variablestwo-stage least squares
The LATE can be estimated by a ratio of the estimated intent-to-treat effect and the estimated proportion of compliers, or alternatively through an instrumental variable estimator.
The standard IV estimator can recover local average treatment effects (LATE) rather than average treatment effects (ATE).

Guido Imbens

Guido W. Imbens
The local average treatment effect (LATE), also known as the complier average causal effect (CACE), was first introduced into the econometrics literature by Guido W. Imbens and Joshua D. Angrist in 1994.

Average treatment effect

treatment effectsaverage treatment effect (ATE)average effect
It is not to be confused with the average treatment effect (ATE), which is the average subject-level treatment effect; the LATE is only the ATE among the compliers.