Locality (linguistics)

localitydomainExtralocalityisland constraintlocallocality of selection
In linguistics, locality refers to the proximity of elements in a linguistic structure.wikipedia
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Projection principle

projects
Locality of Selection states that properties of lexical items must be satisfied locally within their domain.

Syntactic movement

movementtracemovements
Theories of transformational grammar use syntactic locality constraints to explain restrictions on argument selection, syntactic binding, and syntactic movement.
Since it was first proposed, the theory of syntactic movement yielded a new field of research aiming at providing the filters that block certain types of movement, also called locality theory.

Subjacency

Subjacency ConditionSubjacency principlethe subjacency condition
Therefore, according to the subjacency condition, movement will result in an ungrammatical sentence.
Subjacency is a general syntactic locality constraint on movement.

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
In linguistics, locality refers to the proximity of elements in a linguistic structure.

Transformational grammar

transformational generative grammartransformationaltransformational-generative grammar
Theories of transformational grammar use syntactic locality constraints to explain restrictions on argument selection, syntactic binding, and syntactic movement.

Theta role

patientTheta rolestheta-role
The projection principle requires that lexical properties — in particular argument structure properties such as thematic roles — be "projected" onto syntactic structures.

X-bar theory

X-bar schemaX' theoryX-bar
Together with Locality of Selection, which forces lexical properties to be projected within a local projection (as defined by X-bar theory ), the projection principle constrains syntactic trees.

Parse tree

concrete syntax treesyntax treeconcrete syntax
Together with Locality of Selection, which forces lexical properties to be projected within a local projection (as defined by X-bar theory ), the projection principle constrains syntactic trees.

Word order

free word orderConstituent orderbasic word order
For example, word order (i.e. constituent order) can vary with and across languages.

Complement (linguistics)

complementcomplementsobject complement
Therefore, each complement and specifier will appear within the local projection of the head that selects it.

Specifier (linguistics)

specifierSpec
Therefore, each complement and specifier will appear within the local projection of the head that selects it.

Head (linguistics)

headheadsheaded
Therefore, each complement and specifier will appear within the local projection of the head that selects it.

Underlying representation

underlyingunderlying formsurface form
In structural accounts of the contrast between (1a) and (1b), the two sentences differ relative to their underlying structure.

Morpheme

morphemesmorphemicderivational
A speaker who can make sense of a word with many morphemes (e.g. affixes) must know: how the morpheme is pronounced and what kind of morpheme it is, (free, prefix, suffix).

Thematic relation

thematic rolethematic rolessemantic role
For example, the thematic role of the constituent that is selected, and the properties of the head which selects it.

Nominative case

nominativenom.NOM
In English, case relates to properties of the pronoun, nominative, accusative, and genitive.

Accusative case

accusativeacc.ACC
In English, case relates to properties of the pronoun, nominative, accusative, and genitive.

Genitive case

genitivegen.GEN
In English, case relates to properties of the pronoun, nominative, accusative, and genitive.

Anaphora (linguistics)

anaphoraanaphoricanaphor
Principle A for locality in Binding Theory refers to the binding of an anaphor and its antecedent which must occur within its local domain.

C-command

Dominance (linguistics)dominate
The local domain is the smallest XP containing a DP, in order to satisfy Binding Theory, the DP must c-command the anaphor and have a subject.

Antecedent (grammar)

antecedentantecedents antecedent
The anaphor, [DP himself] i, and antecedent, [DP John] i, are selected within the same local domain.

Complementary distribution

complementary distributionscomplimentaryconditional allophones
Further, both Principle A and B predict that pronouns and anaphos must occur in complementary distribution.

Small clause

small clauses
Small clauses show that different categories can have subjects, which is supported by Binding Theory.