Locutionary act

locutionary
In linguistics and the philosophy of mind, a locutionary act is the performance of an utterance, and hence of a speech act.wikipedia
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Speech act

speech actsspeech act theoryIndirect speech act
In linguistics and the philosophy of mind, a locutionary act is the performance of an utterance, and hence of a speech act.
The contemporary use of the term goes back to J. L. Austin's development of performative utterances and his theory of locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary acts.

Illocutionary act

illocutionaryillocutionary forceforce
The term equally refers to the surface meaning of an utterance because, according to J. L. Austin's posthumous "How To Do Things With Words", a speech act should be analysed as a locutionary act (i.e. the actual utterance and its ostensible meaning, comprising phonetic, phatic and rhetic acts corresponding to the verbal, syntactic and semantic aspects of any meaningful utterance), as well as an illocutionary act (the semantic 'illocutionary force' of the utterance, thus its real, intended meaning), and in certain cases a further perlocutionary act (i.e. its actual effect, whether intended or not).
at the dinner table, the illocutionary act is a request: "please give me some salt" even though the locutionary act (the literal sentence) was to ask a question about the presence of salt.

Perlocutionary act

perlocutionaryperlocutionary forceperlocutions
The term equally refers to the surface meaning of an utterance because, according to J. L. Austin's posthumous "How To Do Things With Words", a speech act should be analysed as a locutionary act (i.e. the actual utterance and its ostensible meaning, comprising phonetic, phatic and rhetic acts corresponding to the verbal, syntactic and semantic aspects of any meaningful utterance), as well as an illocutionary act (the semantic 'illocutionary force' of the utterance, thus its real, intended meaning), and in certain cases a further perlocutionary act (i.e. its actual effect, whether intended or not).
This is contrasted with locutionary and illocutionary acts (which are levels of description, rather than classifications of speech acts).

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
In linguistics and the philosophy of mind, a locutionary act is the performance of an utterance, and hence of a speech act.

Philosophy of mind

mindmental philosophyphilosopher of mind
In linguistics and the philosophy of mind, a locutionary act is the performance of an utterance, and hence of a speech act.

Utterance

utterancesexpressionexpressions
In linguistics and the philosophy of mind, a locutionary act is the performance of an utterance, and hence of a speech act.

J. L. Austin

John AustinAustinJohn L. Austin
The term equally refers to the surface meaning of an utterance because, according to J. L. Austin's posthumous "How To Do Things With Words", a speech act should be analysed as a locutionary act (i.e. the actual utterance and its ostensible meaning, comprising phonetic, phatic and rhetic acts corresponding to the verbal, syntactic and semantic aspects of any meaningful utterance), as well as an illocutionary act (the semantic 'illocutionary force' of the utterance, thus its real, intended meaning), and in certain cases a further perlocutionary act (i.e. its actual effect, whether intended or not).

John Searle

SearleJohn R. SearleSearle, John
This taxonomy of speech acts was inherited by John R. Searle, Austin's pupil at Oxford and subsequently an influential exponent of speech act theory.

Metalocutionary act

The term metalocutionary act originated as metalocution (Gibbon 1976, 1983) in functional descriptions of intonation in English and German, by analogy with locution (locutionary act), illocution (illocutionary act) and perlocution (perlocutionary act) in speech act theory.

Hush (Buffy the Vampire Slayer)

HushGentlemenHush" (''Buffy the Vampire Slayer'' episode)
These pseudo conversations are what Buffy essayists Alice Jenkins and Susan Stuart refer to as "locutionary acts": language that is formed to have meaning but does not engage the listener.

Linguistic development of Genie

By contrast, she frequently understood and responded to highly complex questions that she could not on tests, especially sentences requiring some degree of inference and sentences performing both a locutionary and illocutionary act.

Locution

* Locutionary act, the performance of an utterance in linguistics and the philosophy of mind.