Lolo Pass (Idaho–Montana)

Lolo PassLolo TrailLolo Trail (Salish: Naptnišaqs - "Nez Perce Trail")
Lolo Pass, elevation 5233 ft, is a mountain pass in the western United States, in the Bitterroot Range of the northern Rocky Mountains.wikipedia
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Bitterroot Range

BitterrootBitterroot Mountain RangeBitterroots
Lolo Pass, elevation 5233 ft, is a mountain pass in the western United States, in the Bitterroot Range of the northern Rocky Mountains.
It then crossed Lolo Pass to the west.

Nez Perce people

Nez PerceNez Perce tribeNez Perce Indian Reservation
The trail, known as naptnišaqs, or "Nez Perce Trail" in Salish, was used by Nez Perce in the 18th century, and by the Lewis and Clark Expedition, guided by Old Toby of the Shoshone, on their westward snowbound journey in September 1805.
The Nez Perce traveled via the Lolo Trail (Salish: Naptnišaqs - "Nez Perce Trail") (Khoo-say-ne-ise-kit) far east as the Plains (Khoo-sayn / Kuseyn) ("Buffalo country") of Montana to hunt buffalo (Qoq'a lx) and as far west as the Pacific Coast (’Eteyekuus) ("Big Water").

U.S. Route 12 in Idaho

U.S. Route 12US 12US-12
U.S. Highway 12, belatedly completed in 1962, crosses the pass.
It extends 174.210 mi from the Washington state line in Lewiston east to the Montana state line at Lolo Pass, generally along the route of the Lewis and Clark expedition, and is known as the Northwest Passage Scenic Byway It was previously known as the Lewis and Clark Highway.

Weippe Prairie

The pass is the highest point of the historic Lolo Trail, between the Bitterroot Valley in Montana and the Weippe Prairie in Idaho.
It is the location in Idaho where the Lewis and Clark Expedition emerged from crossing the Bitterroot Mountains on the Lolo Trail and first met the Nez Perce tribe of Native Americans.

Battle of the Big Hole

Battle of Big HoleBig Hole
Shortly after crossing the pass, the two sides clashed at the Battle of the Big Hole in Montana.
The Nez Perce crossed from Idaho into Montana via rugged Lolo Pass.

Nez Perce War

Nez Percean uprisingNez Perce campaign
The Lolo Trail is a National Historic Landmark, designated for its importance to the Lewis and Clark Expedition, and its role in the 1877 Nez Perce War.
They crossed from Idaho over Lolo Pass into Montana Territory, traveling southeast, dipping into Yellowstone National Park and then back north into Montana, roughly 1170 mi.

Old Toby

The trail, known as naptnišaqs, or "Nez Perce Trail" in Salish, was used by Nez Perce in the 18th century, and by the Lewis and Clark Expedition, guided by Old Toby of the Shoshone, on their westward snowbound journey in September 1805.
He guided Clark's exploration of the Salmon River and led the entire party from the Lemhi River Valley at Salmon, Idaho, over the Bitterroot Mountains to the Bitterroot Valley, and then over the Lolo Trail to the Clearwater River country above Lewiston, Idaho.

Lochsa River

Lochsa
The first limited services in Idaho are in Powell, 13 mi to the west of the pass, then another 65 mi to Lowell, at the confluence of the Lochsa and Selway Rivers to form the Middle Fork of the Clearwater.
During mid-September 1805, the explorers Lewis and Clark traveled westward along the Lolo Trail, descending into and out of the Lochsa Gorge, then above its north rim.

Elevation

hightopographic elevationelevated
Lolo Pass, elevation 5233 ft, is a mountain pass in the western United States, in the Bitterroot Range of the northern Rocky Mountains.

Mountain pass

colpasspasses
Lolo Pass, elevation 5233 ft, is a mountain pass in the western United States, in the Bitterroot Range of the northern Rocky Mountains.

Western United States

American WestwesternWest
Lolo Pass, elevation 5233 ft, is a mountain pass in the western United States, in the Bitterroot Range of the northern Rocky Mountains.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Lolo Pass, elevation 5233 ft, is a mountain pass in the western United States, in the Bitterroot Range of the northern Rocky Mountains.

Rocky Mountains

RockiesRocky MountainRocky Mountain Region
Lolo Pass, elevation 5233 ft, is a mountain pass in the western United States, in the Bitterroot Range of the northern Rocky Mountains.

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
It is on the border between the states of Montana and Idaho, approximately 40 mi west-southwest of Missoula, Montana.

Montana

MTState of MontanaMontana, USA
It is on the border between the states of Montana and Idaho, approximately 40 mi west-southwest of Missoula, Montana.

Idaho

IDState of Idaho(ID)
It is on the border between the states of Montana and Idaho, approximately 40 mi west-southwest of Missoula, Montana.

Missoula, Montana

MissoulaMissoula, MTMissoula Montana
It is on the border between the states of Montana and Idaho, approximately 40 mi west-southwest of Missoula, Montana.

Bitterroot Valley

Bitter Root Valleyand ValleyBitterroot
The pass is the highest point of the historic Lolo Trail, between the Bitterroot Valley in Montana and the Weippe Prairie in Idaho.

Salish-Spokane-Kalispel language

SalishMontana SalishSalish language
The trail, known as naptnišaqs, or "Nez Perce Trail" in Salish, was used by Nez Perce in the 18th century, and by the Lewis and Clark Expedition, guided by Old Toby of the Shoshone, on their westward snowbound journey in September 1805.

Lewis and Clark Expedition

Lewis and ClarkLewis & ClarkLewis & Clark Expedition
The trail, known as naptnišaqs, or "Nez Perce Trail" in Salish, was used by Nez Perce in the 18th century, and by the Lewis and Clark Expedition, guided by Old Toby of the Shoshone, on their westward snowbound journey in September 1805.

Shoshone

ShoshoniShoshone peopleShoshone Indians
The trail, known as naptnišaqs, or "Nez Perce Trail" in Salish, was used by Nez Perce in the 18th century, and by the Lewis and Clark Expedition, guided by Old Toby of the Shoshone, on their westward snowbound journey in September 1805.

Fort Clatsop

Fort Clatsop National Memorial
After a winter at Fort Clatsop in present-day northwestern Oregon, the Corps of Discovery returned the following June.

Oregon

ORState of OregonOregon, USA
After a winter at Fort Clatsop in present-day northwestern Oregon, the Corps of Discovery returned the following June.

National Historic Landmark

National Historic Landmark DistrictNational Historic LandmarksNational Historical Landmark
The Lolo Trail is a National Historic Landmark, designated for its importance to the Lewis and Clark Expedition, and its role in the 1877 Nez Perce War.

David Thompson (explorer)

David ThompsonExplorer David ThompsonThompson
Its first known mention is in the 1810 journal of David Thompson, who described three fur trappers, probably of French descent, named Michael, Lolo, and Gregoire.