London Missionary Society

LMSLondon MissionL.M.S.English Baptist MissionEuropean missionariesLMS missionariesLondon Diocesan Home MissionaryLondon MissionaryLondon Missionary SocietiesLondon Missionary Society (LMS)
The London Missionary Society was a predominantly Congregationalist missionary society formed in England in 1795 at the instigation of Welsh Congregationalist minister Dr Edward Williams working with evangelical Anglicans and various nonconformists.wikipedia
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Congregational church

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The London Missionary Society was a predominantly Congregationalist missionary society formed in England in 1795 at the instigation of Welsh Congregationalist minister Dr Edward Williams working with evangelical Anglicans and various nonconformists. It was largely Reformed in outlook, with Congregational missions in Oceania, Africa, and the Americas, although there were also Presbyterians (notable for their work in China), Methodists, Baptists and various other Protestants involved.
It has been introduced either by immigrant dissenter Protestants or by missionary organization such as the London Missionary Society.

Missionary

missionariesmissionary workmission
The London Missionary Society was a predominantly Congregationalist missionary society formed in England in 1795 at the instigation of Welsh Congregationalist minister Dr Edward Williams working with evangelical Anglicans and various nonconformists.
The London Missionary Society was an evangelical organisation, bringing together from its inception both Anglicans and Nonconformists; it was founded in England in 1795 with missions in Africa and the islands of the South Pacific.

John Love (minister)

John Love
He had the support of the presbyterian John Love, and congregationalists Edward Parsons and John Townshend (1757–1826).
John Love D.D. (1757–1825) was a Church of Scotland minister, known for his early involvement with the London Missionary Society.

Joseph Hardcastle (1752–1819)

Joseph Hardcastle
Joseph Hardcastle of Hatcham House, Deptford became the first Treasurer, and the Rev. John Eyre of Hackney (editor of the Evangelical Magazine ) became the first Secretary to the Missionary Society—the latter appointment providing it with an effective 'newspaper' to promote its cause.
One of the founders of The Missionary Society, later the London Missionary Society, he devoted time and money to its affairs, becoming its first Treasurer.

Duff (1794 ship)

Duff
The society was able to afford the small ship Duff, of 267 tons (bm).
In 1796 the London Missionary Society engaged her to take a party of missionaries to the South Pacific.

James Wilson (explorer)

James WilsonCaptain James Wilson
A Captain James Wilson offered to sail the missionaries to their destination unpaid.
Captain James Wilson (1760–1814), commanded the British ship Duff, which the London Missionary Society contracted in 1797 to convey a team of missionaries (consisting of thirty men, six women, and three children) to their postings in Tahiti, Tonga, and the Marquesas Islands.

Thomas Haweis

John Eyre responded by inviting a leading and influential evangelical, Rev. Thomas Haweis, to write a response to Bogue's appeal.
As a Church of England cleric he was one of the leading figures of the 18th century evangelical revival and a key figure in the histories of the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion, the Free Church of England and the London Missionary Society.

Masbrough Independent Chapel

Independent chapelIndependent Church in MasbroughMasbrough
He left Birmingham in 1795, becoming pastor at Masbrough, Rotherham, and tutor of the newly formed Masbrough academy.
Williams had been one of those involved in the formation in 1794 of the missionary society that was later named London Missionary Society.

Methodism

MethodistMethodist ChurchMethodists
It was largely Reformed in outlook, with Congregational missions in Oceania, Africa, and the Americas, although there were also Presbyterians (notable for their work in China), Methodists, Baptists and various other Protestants involved.
Benjamin Hobson (1816–1873), a medical missionary sent by the London Missionary Society in 1839, set up a highly successful Wai Ai Clinic Liang Fa (Leung Fat in Cantonese, 梁發, 1789–1855, ordained by the London Missionary Society), Hok Chau and others worked there.

John Eyre (evangelical minister)

John EyreJohn Eyre (evangelical priest)
Also in 1793, the Anglican cleric John Eyre of Hackney founded the Evangelical Magazine.
He was one of the founders of the London Missionary Society (1794–5), and he encouraged Edward Hanson in establishing a dissenting academy at Idle, about 1800.

William Ellis (missionary)

William EllisRev. William EllisEllis
After attending Homerton College, then in Hampstead, William Ellis (missionary) was ordained in 1815.
Being of a religious nature, he applied to train as a Christian missionary for the London Missionary Society and was accepted to the school.

Edward Williams (minister)

Edward Williams
In 1793, Edward Williams, then minister at Carr's Lane, Birmingham, wrote a letter to the churches of the Midlands, expressing the need for world evangelization and foreign missions.
The society was formed in 1795 and subsequently took the name London Missionary Society.

Tahiti

TahitianOtaheiteHistory of Tahiti
Seven months after the crew left port from the Woolwich docks in late 1796 they arrived in Tahiti, where seventeen missionaries departed.
On 5 March 1797, representatives of the London Missionary Society landed at Matavai Bay (Mahina) on board Duff, with the intention of converting the pagan native populations to Christianity.

Robert Morrison (missionary)

Robert MorrisonMorrisonDr Robert Morrison
Gradually it recovered, however, and in 1807 was able to establish a mission in Guangzhou (Canton), China under Robert Morrison.
After his mother's death in 1804, he joined the London Missionary Society.

Samoa

Western SamoaIndependent State of SamoaSamoan
1830 – John Williams sighted the coast of Savai'i in Samoa and landed on August 24, 1830 at Sapapali'i village in search of Malietoa Vai‘inupo, a paramount chief of Samoa.
Christian missionary work in Samoa began in 1830 when John Williams of the London Missionary Society arrived in Sapapali'i from the Cook Islands and Tahiti.

American Samoa

America SamoaSamoaAS
1832 – John Williams landed at Leone Bay in what was later to become American Samoa.
Mission work in the Samoas had begun in late 1830 when John Williams of the London Missionary Society arrived from the Cook Islands and Tahiti.

David Bogue

Scottish ministers in the London area, David Bogue and James Steven, as well as other evangelicals such as John Hey, joined forces to organize a new society.
It was the age of the new-born missionary enterprise, and Bogue's academy was largely the seed from which the London Missionary Society grew.

Robert Moffat (missionary)

Robert MoffatMoffatRobert Moffatt
In September 1816 Robert Moffat (1795–1883) was commissioned in the Surrey Chapel, on the same day as John Williams.
For a short period, after having applied successfully to the London Missionary Society (LMS) to become an overseas missionary, he took an interim post as a farmer, at Plantation Farm in Dukinfield (where he first met his future wife).

David Livingstone

LivingstoneDr. LivingstoneDr Livingstone
In 1840 the medical missionary and explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873) departed for South Africa, arriving in 1841, and serving with the LMS until 1857.
David Livingstone (19 March 1813 – 1 May 1873) was a Scottish physician, Congregationalist, and pioneer Christian missionary with the London Missionary Society, an explorer in Africa, and one of the most popular British heroes of the late 19th-century Victorian era.

Abney Park Cemetery

Abney Parknon-denominational garden cemeterythe cemetery there
His widow is buried with their son, Samuel Tamatoa Williams, at the old Cedar Circle in London's Abney Park Cemetery, the name of her husband and the record of his death described first on the stone.
Its approach was based on the Congregational church's role in the London Missionary Society (LMS), whose fundamental principle was to develop a wholly non-denominational exemplar.

John Williams (missionary)

John WilliamsJohn C. WilliamsJohn William
1830 – John Williams sighted the coast of Savai'i in Samoa and landed on August 24, 1830 at Sapapali'i village in search of Malietoa Vai‘inupo, a paramount chief of Samoa.
In September 1816, the London Missionary Society (LMS) commissioned him as a missionary in a service held at Surrey Chapel, London.

George Pratt (missionary)

Reverend George PrattGeorge PrattRev George Pratt
1839–1879 – Reverend George Pratt served as a missionary in Samoa for many years, at the station at Matautu on Savai'i island.
George Pratt (1817–1894) was a missionary with the London Missionary Society who lived in Samoa for forty years from 1839–1879, mostly on the island of Savai'i.

Edward Stallybrass

In 1817 Edward Stallybrass was sent out to Russia to start a mission among the Buryat people of Siberia.
In 1817, they were married and both left for Russia the same year under the auspices of the London Missionary Society (LMS).

Surrey Chapel, Southwark

Surrey ChapelSurrey Chapel Society
In September 1816 Robert Moffat (1795–1883) was commissioned in the Surrey Chapel, on the same day as John Williams.
One of the chapel's principal associations was with the non-denominational London Missionary Society; for over sixty years the society held its principal annual sermon at Surrey Chapel and from here dispatched many of its best known missionaries including Robert Moffat and John Williams.

Abdullah Abdul Kadir

Munshi AbdullahAbdullah bin Abdul KadirAbdullah
Starting in 1815, they hired Abdullah bin Abdul Kadir as a translator, to work on many texts including the gospels.
He became a scribe and copyist for Sir Stamford Raffles, followed by, in 1815, becoming translator of the Gospels and other text for the London Missionary Society.