London Underground

Undergroundtubetube stationthe TubeLondonLondon Tubetube stationsunderground trainLondon Underground Ltdunderground railway
The London Underground (also known simply as the Underground, or by its nickname the Tube) is a public rapid transit system serving Greater London, England and some parts of the adjacent counties of Buckinghamshire, Essex and Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom.wikipedia
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Circle line (London Underground)

CircleCircle lineInner Circle
Opened in January 1863, it is now part of the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines; the first line to operate underground electric traction trains, the City & South London Railway in 1890, is now part of the Northern line.
The Circle line is a London Underground line in a spiralling shape, running from Hammersmith in the west to Edgware Road and then looping around central London back to Edgware Road.

Metropolitan line

Metropolitanrail
Opened in January 1863, it is now part of the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines; the first line to operate underground electric traction trains, the City & South London Railway in 1890, is now part of the Northern line.
The Metropolitan line, colloquially known as the Met, is a London Underground line that runs between in the City of London and and in Buckinghamshire, with branches to in Hertfordshire and in the western London Borough of Hillingdon.

List of metro systems

Metro systems by annual passenger ridesthe largest number of rapid transit stations in the worldthe seventh busiest in the world
The network has expanded to 11 lines, and in 2017/18 carried 1.357 billion passengers, making it the world's 11th busiest metro system.
The London Underground first opened as an "underground railway" in 1863 and its first electrified underground line opened in 1890, making it the world's oldest metro system.

List of London Underground stations

London Underground stationLondon Underground stationsstations
The system has 270 stations and 250 mi of track.
The London Underground is a metro system in the United Kingdom that serves Greater London and the home counties of Buckinghamshire, Essex and Hertfordshire.

Rapid transit

subwaymetrounderground
The London Underground (also known simply as the Underground, or by its nickname the Tube) is a public rapid transit system serving Greater London, England and some parts of the adjacent counties of Buckinghamshire, Essex and Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom.
The world's first rapid transit system was the partially underground Metropolitan Railway which opened as a conventional railway in 1863, and now forms part of the London Underground.

Transport for London

TfLLondon TransportTransport for London (TfL)
The current operator, London Underground Limited (LUL), is a wholly owned subsidiary of Transport for London (TfL), the statutory corporation responsible for the transport network in Greater London.
TfL has responsibility for London's network of principal road routes, for various rail networks including the London Underground, London Overground, Docklands Light Railway and TfL Rail.

Tube map

London Underground mapLondon tube mapLondon Underground diagram
The schematic Tube map, designed by Harry Beck in 1931, was voted a national design icon in 2006 and now includes other TfL transport systems such as the Docklands Light Railway, London Overground, Crossrail (which is officially called Elizabeth Line) and Tramlink.
The Tube map (sometimes called the London Underground Map or the TfL Services Map) is a schematic transport map of the lines, stations and services of the London Underground, known colloquially as "the Tube", hence the map's name.

Harry Beck

Beck
The schematic Tube map, designed by Harry Beck in 1931, was voted a national design icon in 2006 and now includes other TfL transport systems such as the Docklands Light Railway, London Overground, Crossrail (which is officially called Elizabeth Line) and Tramlink.
Henry Charles Beck (4 June 1902 – 18 September 1974) was an English technical draughtsman who created the present London Underground Tube map in 1931.

London Overground

OvergroundLondon Overground stationLondon Overground stations
The schematic Tube map, designed by Harry Beck in 1931, was voted a national design icon in 2006 and now includes other TfL transport systems such as the Docklands Light Railway, London Overground, Crossrail (which is officially called Elizabeth Line) and Tramlink.
It is complementary to the London Underground.

Crossrail

Elizabeth lineCrossrail 1a railway across London from west to east
The schematic Tube map, designed by Harry Beck in 1931, was voted a national design icon in 2006 and now includes other TfL transport systems such as the Docklands Light Railway, London Overground, Crossrail (which is officially called Elizabeth Line) and Tramlink.
This will provide some relief for London Underground lines such as the Central, the District, the Jubilee line extension and the Heathrow branch of the Piccadilly line.

Docklands Light Railway

DLRDLR BridgeDLR station
The schematic Tube map, designed by Harry Beck in 1931, was voted a national design icon in 2006 and now includes other TfL transport systems such as the Docklands Light Railway, London Overground, Crossrail (which is officially called Elizabeth Line) and Tramlink.
Similar proposals have been made for the Tube.

Baker Street tube station

Baker StreetBaker Street stationBaker Street Underground station
Both railways expanded, the District building five branches to the west reaching Ealing, Hounslow, Uxbridge, Richmond and Wimbledon and the Metropolitan eventually extended as far as in Buckinghamshire, more than 50 mi from Baker Street and the centre of London.
Baker Street is a London Underground station at the junction of Baker Street and the Marylebone Road in the City of Westminster.

Tramlink

Croydon TramlinkLondon TramlinkCroydon
The schematic Tube map, designed by Harry Beck in 1931, was voted a national design icon in 2006 and now includes other TfL transport systems such as the Docklands Light Railway, London Overground, Crossrail (which is officially called Elizabeth Line) and Tramlink.
The network's lines coincide in central Croydon, with eastbound termini at Beckenham Junction, Elmers End and New Addington, and a westbound terminus at Wimbledon, where there is an interchange for London Underground.

Bank and Monument stations

BankBank stationMonument
For the first deep-level tube line, the City and South London Railway, two 10 ft diameter circular tunnels were dug between King William Street (close to today's Monument station) and Stockwell, under the roads to avoid the need for agreement with owners of property on the surface.
Bank and Monument are interlinked London Underground and Docklands Light Railway stations that form a public transport complex spanning the length of King William Street in the City of London.

Tunnel

cut-and-coverunderpasscut and cover
The system's first tunnels were built just below the surface, using the cut-and-cover method; later, smaller, roughly circular tunnels—which gave rise to its nickname, the Tube—were dug through at a deeper level.
In the UK, a pedestrian, cycle or animal tunnel beneath a road or railway is called a subway, while an underground railway system is differently named in different cities, the "Underground" or the "Tube" in London, the "Subway" in Glasgow, and the "Metro" in Newcastle.

Central London Railway

Central LondonEaling to Shepherds Bush branch lineTwopenny Tube
The Waterloo and City Railway opened in 1898, followed by the Central London Railway in 1900, known as the "twopenny tube".
The CLR's tunnels and stations form the central section of the London Underground's Central line.

District Railway

Metropolitan District RailwayDistrictMetropolitan and District
The Metropolitan District Railway (commonly known as the District Railway) opened in December 1868 from South Kensington to Westminster as part of a plan for an underground "inner circle" connecting London's main-line stations.
Today, former District Railway tracks and stations are used by the London Underground's District, Piccadilly and Circle lines.

Moorgate station

MoorgateLondon MoorgateMoorgate Street
These two ran electric trains in circular tunnels having diameters between 11 ft and 12 ft, whereas the Great Northern and City Railway, which opened in 1904, was built to take main line trains from Finsbury Park to a Moorgate terminus in the City and had 16 ft diameter tunnels.
Moorgate is a central London railway terminus and connected London Underground station on Moorgate in the City of London.

City and South London Railway

City & South London RailwayCity and South LondonCity of London and Southwark Subway
Opened in January 1863, it is now part of the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines; the first line to operate underground electric traction trains, the City & South London Railway in 1890, is now part of the Northern line. For the first deep-level tube line, the City and South London Railway, two 10 ft diameter circular tunnels were dug between King William Street (close to today's Monument station) and Stockwell, under the roads to avoid the need for agreement with owners of property on the surface.
In 1913, the C&SLR became part of the Underground Group of railways and, in the 1920s, it underwent major reconstruction works before its merger with another of the Group's railways, the Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway, forming a single London Underground line called the Morden-Edgware line.

Finsbury Park station

Finsbury ParkFinsbury Park LU
These two ran electric trains in circular tunnels having diameters between 11 ft and 12 ft, whereas the Great Northern and City Railway, which opened in 1904, was built to take main line trains from Finsbury Park to a Moorgate terminus in the City and had 16 ft diameter tunnels.
It serves a number of National Rail, London Underground and bus services.

Underground Electric Railways Company of London

Underground GroupUnderground Electric Railways of LondonUERL
Yerkes soon had control of the District Railway and established the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL) in 1902 to finance and operate three tube lines, the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway (Bakerloo), the Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (Hampstead) and the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway, (Piccadilly), which all opened between 1906 and 1907.
The UERL is a precursor of today's London Underground; its three tube lines form the central sections of today's Bakerloo, Northern and Piccadilly lines.

Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway

Brompton and Piccadilly Circus RailwayGreat Northern and Strand RailwayGreat Northern, Piccadilly & Brompton Railway
Yerkes soon had control of the District Railway and established the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL) in 1902 to finance and operate three tube lines, the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway (Bakerloo), the Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (Hampstead) and the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway, (Piccadilly), which all opened between 1906 and 1907.
Today, the GNP&BR's tunnels and stations form the core central section of the London Underground's Piccadilly line.

Baker Street and Waterloo Railway

Baker Street & Waterloo RailwayBakerloo tubeBakerloo line
Yerkes soon had control of the District Railway and established the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL) in 1902 to finance and operate three tube lines, the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway (Bakerloo), the Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (Hampstead) and the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway, (Piccadilly), which all opened between 1906 and 1907.
Today, the BS&WR's tunnels and stations operate as the London Underground's Bakerloo line.

Piccadilly line

PiccadillyLondon UndergroundBlue Line (London)
The Piccadilly line was extended north to Cockfosters and took over District line branches to Harrow (later Uxbridge) and Hounslow.
The Piccadilly line is a London Underground line that runs between in suburban north London and in the west, where it divides into two branches: one of these runs to Heathrow Airport and the other to in northwest London, with some services terminating at.

Edward Johnston

Other famous London Underground branding includes the roundel and Johnston typeface, created by Edward Johnston in 1916.
He is most famous for designing the sans-serif Johnston typeface that was used throughout the London Underground system until it was redesigned in the 1980s.