Longship

Viking longshipDrekarshipdragon shipDrakkardrakkarslongshipsSnekkeViking shipViking Ships
Longships were a type of specialised Viking warships that have a long history in Scandinavia, with their existence being archaeologically proven and documented from at least the fourth century BC.wikipedia
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Vikings

VikingNorseDanes
Originally invented and used by the Norsemen (commonly known as the Vikings) for commerce, exploration, and warfare during the Viking Age, many of the longship's characteristics were adopted by other cultures, like Anglo-Saxons and continued to influence shipbuilding for centuries.
Facilitated by advanced sailing and navigational skills, and characterised by the longship, Viking activities at times also extended into the Mediterranean littoral, North Africa, and the Middle East.

Viking Age

Viking EraVikingViking period
Originally invented and used by the Norsemen (commonly known as the Vikings) for commerce, exploration, and warfare during the Viking Age, many of the longship's characteristics were adopted by other cultures, like Anglo-Saxons and continued to influence shipbuilding for centuries.
The clinker-built longships used by the Scandinavians were uniquely suited to both deep and shallow waters.

Karve (ship)

KarveKarvi
The Karvi (or karve) is the smallest vessel that is considered a longship.
Karves (or Karvi) were a small type of longship with broad hull, somewhat similar to the ocean-going knarr cargo ships.

Clinker (boat building)

clinker-builtclinkerclinker built
The longship's design evolved over many centuries, beginning in the Stone Age with the invention of the umiak and continuing up until the 6th century with clinker-built ships like Nydam and Kvalsund.
Clinker-built ships were a trademark of Nordic navigation throughout the Middle Ages, particularly of the longships of the Viking raiders and the trading cogs of the Hanseatic League.

Knarr

Knaarknerrirknarrer
Unlike in knarrs, a longship sail was not stitched.
The knarr (, plural knerrir) was constructed using the same clinker-built method as longships, karves, and faerings.

Ormen Lange (longship)

Ormen LangeLong SerpentOrmrinn Langi
Ormr inn Langi in Old Norse (The Long Serpent) Ormen Lange in Norwegian, Ormurin Langi in Faroese was one of the most famous of the Viking longships.

Mora (ship)

MoraMora'' (ship)
Mora was a ship of Drakar design and clinker construction built at Barfleur in Normandy, a gift of Matilda of Flanders to her husband William the Conqueror in the summer of 1066.

Draken Harald Hårfagre

Dragon Harald FairhairDragon Harald Fairhair'' (ship)Draken Harald Harfagre
In 2012, a 35-metre long skeid longship named Draken Harald Hårfagre was launched in Norway.
Draken Harald Hårfagre (Dragon Harald Fairhair) is a large Viking longship built in the municipality of Haugesund, Norway.

Havhingsten fra Glendalough

Sea Stallion from GlendaloughSea StallionSeastallion from Glendalough
Skuldelev 2 was replicated as Seastallion from Glendalough at the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde and launched in 2004.
Havhingsten fra Glendalough ("The Sea Stallion from Glendalough" or just "Sea Stallion") is a reconstruction of Skuldelev 2, one of the Skuldelev ships and the second-largest Viking longship ever to be found.

Sunstone (medieval)

sunstoneMedieval sunstonecalcite "sunstones
The Danish archaeologist Thorkild Ramskou suggested in 1967 that the "sun-stones" referred to in some sagas might have been natural crystals capable of polarizing skylight.
Ramskou further conjectured that the sunstone could have aided navigation in the open sea in the Viking period.

Iceland spar

Iceland crystalIcelandic spar
To derive a course to steer relative to the sun direction, he uses a sun-stone (solarsteinn) made of Iceland spar (optical calcite or silfurberg), and a "horizon-board."
It has been speculated that the sunstone (, a different mineral from the gem-quality sunstone) mentioned in medieval Icelandic texts was Iceland spar, and that Vikings used its light-polarizing property to tell the direction of the sun on cloudy days for navigational purposes.

Póvoa de Varzim

PóvoaPóvoa do VarzimVilla Euracini
The Lancha Poveira, a boat from Póvoa de Varzim, Portugal is one of the last remnants from the longship, keeping all the longboat features but without a long stern and bow, and with a lateen sail.
The most notable of which, the Lancha Poveira, was believed to be derived from the Drakkar Viking, but without a long stern and bow and with a lateen sail.

Hugin (longship)

Huginreplica longship
The Hugin is a reconstructed longship located at Pegwell Bay in Kent, England.

Sverre of Norway

Sverre SigurdssonSverreSverre I
In the sea battles of medieval Scandinavia, the side with the largest and highest ships would usually have an advantage, since this meant the crew could attack the enemy from above with projectiles and other weapons.

Medieval ships

crayerboatsships typical of early medieval to early 17th-century Europe
Unlike the longship and cog, it used a carvel method of construction.

Nordland (boat)

NordlandNordlandsbåtNordland boats
It has dominated the Lofoten and Vesterålen islands fishing industry for centuries and is closely related to the old Viking longships.

Skuldelev ships

Skuldelev 2recordedSkuldelev
It is a longship, possibly of the skeid type.

Norsemen

NorseNorsemanNorthmen
Originally invented and used by the Norsemen (commonly known as the Vikings) for commerce, exploration, and warfare during the Viking Age, many of the longship's characteristics were adopted by other cultures, like Anglo-Saxons and continued to influence shipbuilding for centuries.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

Anglo Saxon ChronicleThe Anglo-Saxon ChronicleAnglo-Saxon Chronicles
Originally invented and used by the Norsemen (commonly known as the Vikings) for commerce, exploration, and warfare during the Viking Age, many of the longship's characteristics were adopted by other cultures, like Anglo-Saxons and continued to influence shipbuilding for centuries.

Nordic Stone Age

Stone AgeNeolithic Stone Ageneolithic
The longship's design evolved over many centuries, beginning in the Stone Age with the invention of the umiak and continuing up until the 6th century with clinker-built ships like Nydam and Kvalsund.

Umiak

umiaqbaidaraskin boats
The longship's design evolved over many centuries, beginning in the Stone Age with the invention of the umiak and continuing up until the 6th century with clinker-built ships like Nydam and Kvalsund.

Nydam Mose

NydamNydam BoatNydam boats
The longship's design evolved over many centuries, beginning in the Stone Age with the invention of the umiak and continuing up until the 6th century with clinker-built ships like Nydam and Kvalsund.

Hull (watercraft)

hullhulledhulls
They were all made out of wood, with cloth sails (woven wool) and had numerous details and carvings on the hull.

Draft (hull)

draughtdraftdrew
The longships were characterized as a graceful, long, wide and light, with a shallow-draft hull designed for speed.

Portage

portagingportage roadcanoe carry
The ship's shallow draft allowed navigation in waters only one meter deep and permitted arbitrary beach landings, while its light weight enabled it to be carried over portages or used bottom-up for shelter in camps.