Lord

lordshipseigneurseigneursoverlordoverlordshipThe LordoverlordsYour LordshipHerrlords
Lord is an appellation for a person or deity who has authority, control, or power over others acting like a master, a chief, or a ruler.wikipedia
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Lady

ladiesDameetymology of "lady
The appellation "lord" is primarily applied to men, while for women the appellation "lady" is used.
Once used to describe only women of a high social class or status, the female equivalent of lord, now it may refer to any adult woman.

Vassal

vassalsvassalagefeudatory
An overlord was a person from whom a landholding or a manor was held by a mesne lord or vassal under various forms of feudal land tenure.
A vassal is a person regarded as having a mutual obligation to a lord or monarch, in the context of the feudal system in medieval Europe.

Feudalism

feudalfeudal systemfeudal lord
Under the feudal system, "lord" had a wide, loose and varied meaning.
The classic definition, by François-Louis Ganshof (1944), feudalism describes a set of reciprocal legal and military obligations among the warrior nobility revolving around the three key concepts of lords, vassals and fiefs.

Mesne lord

mesnemesne tenantmesne borough
An overlord was a person from whom a landholding or a manor was held by a mesne lord or vassal under various forms of feudal land tenure.
A mesne lord was a lord in the feudal system who had vassals who held land from him, but who was himself the vassal of a higher lord.

English feudal barony

honourfeudal baronfeudal barony
A feudal baron was a true titular dignity, with the right to attend Parliament, but a feudal baron, Lord of the Manor of many manors, was a vassal of the King.
A tenant-in-chief could be the lord of fractions of several different baronies, if he or his ancestors had married co-heiresses.

Homage (feudal)

homageliege lordliege
A liege lord was a person to whom a vassal owed sworn allegiance.
Homage (from Medieval Latin hominaticum, lit. "pertaining to a man") in the Middle Ages was the ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).

Earl

jarlearldomjarls
Five ranks of peer exist in the United Kingdom: in descending order these are duke, marquess, earl, viscount, and baron.
In either case, he is referred to as Lord [X], and his wife as Lady [X].

Senhor

His LordshipHer LadyshipSenhora
From this Latin source derived directly also the Italian Signore, the Spanish Señor, the Portuguese Senhor.
Sr. es or Srs.), from the Latin Senior (comparative of Senex, "old man"), is the Portuguese word for lord, sir or mister.

Lord of Parliament

Lordship of ParliamentLords of Parliamentlordships of Parliament
In the Peerage of Scotland, the members of the lowest level of the peerage have the substantive title 'Lord of Parliament' rather than Baron.
A male holder of such a lordship is designated a "Lord of Parliament," while there is no similar designation for female holders.

Courtesy title

courtesystyledcourtesy titles
The appellation can also denote certain persons who hold a title of the peerage in the United Kingdom, or are entitled to courtesy titles.
By extension, the children not only of all peers but of those who bear derivative courtesy titles as male-line descendants of a substantive peer bear specific titles (Lord/Lady) or styles (The Honourable) by courtesy.

Baron

Baronessbaronsbarony
Five ranks of peer exist in the United Kingdom: in descending order these are duke, marquess, earl, viscount, and baron.
All who held their feudal barony "in-chief of the king", that is with the king as his immediate overlord, became alike barones regis ("barons of the king"), bound to perform a stipulated annual military service, and obliged to attend his council.

Mr.

MrMisterMessrs.
Ginoo is also the Tagalog root for Ginoóng, the modern equivalent of the English term "Mister" (akin to how Romance language terms like señor may be glossed as either "lord", "mister", or "sir").
Messieurs is the plural of monsieur (originally mon sieur, "my lord"), formed by declining both of its constituent parts separately.

Baal

Ba'alBaʿalBa‘al
Baal, properly Baʿal, was a title and honorific meaning "owner," "lord" in the Northwest Semitic languages spoken in the Levant during antiquity.

EN (cuneiform)

ENN
164 ; U+12097 𒂗, see also ENSI) is the Sumerian cuneiform for "lord" or "priest".

Enki

EaNudimmudEnki/Ea
The Sumerian En is translated as a title equivalent to "lord" and was originally a title given to the High Priest.

Jesus is Lord

Lordcall me ''Lord, LordSlogan 'Jesus is Lord
of the New Testament Christian Bible says, "...if you confess with your mouth, 'Jesus is Lord,' and believe in your heart that God has raised him from the dead, you will be saved."

Milord

m'lud
It apparently derives ultimately from the English phrase "my lord", which was borrowed into Middle French as millourt or milor, meaning a noble or rich man.

Deity

deitiesgodsgod
Lord is an appellation for a person or deity who has authority, control, or power over others acting like a master, a chief, or a ruler.

Authority

authority figureauthoritiesauthoritative
Lord is an appellation for a person or deity who has authority, control, or power over others acting like a master, a chief, or a ruler.

Power (social and political)

powerpolitical powerpowers
Lord is an appellation for a person or deity who has authority, control, or power over others acting like a master, a chief, or a ruler.

Peerage

peerpeerspeeress
Five ranks of peer exist in the United Kingdom: in descending order these are duke, marquess, earl, viscount, and baron. The appellation can also denote certain persons who hold a title of the peerage in the United Kingdom, or are entitled to courtesy titles.

Peerages in the United Kingdom

British peerpeerpeerage
The collective "Lords" can refer to a group or body of peers.

Oxford Dictionary of English

New Oxford Dictionary of EnglishODEOxford Dictionaries
According to the Oxford Dictionary of English, the etymology of the word can be traced back to the Old English word hlāford which originated from hlāfweard meaning "loaf-ward" or "bread keeper", reflecting the Germanic tribal custom of a chieftain providing food for his followers.

Etymology

etymologicaletymologicallyetymologies
According to the Oxford Dictionary of English, the etymology of the word can be traced back to the Old English word hlāford which originated from hlāfweard meaning "loaf-ward" or "bread keeper", reflecting the Germanic tribal custom of a chieftain providing food for his followers.