Lord President of the Council

Lord PresidentThe Lord President of the CouncilShadow Lord President of the CouncilLord President of the Privy CouncilPresident of the King's CouncilCouncil Presidentlord presidency of the councilLord President of the King's CouncilLord President of the MarchesLord Presidents of the Council
The Lord President of the Council is the fourth of the Great Officers of State of the United Kingdom, ranking below the Lord High Treasurer but above the Lord Privy Seal.wikipedia
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Lord Privy Seal

Keeper of the Privy SealPrivy SealLord Keeper of the Privy Seal
The Lord President of the Council is the fourth of the Great Officers of State of the United Kingdom, ranking below the Lord High Treasurer but above the Lord Privy Seal.
The Lord Privy Seal (or, more formally, the Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal) is the fifth of the Great Officers of State in the United Kingdom, ranking beneath the Lord President of the Council and above the Lord Great Chamberlain.

Leader of the House of Commons

Leader of the HouseDeputy Leader of the House of CommonsLeader
In recent years it has been most typical for the Lord President also to serve as Leader of the House of Commons or Leader of the House of Lords.
Historically, the position was usually held by the Prime Minister if he or she sat in the House of Commons; in more recent years, the post has been held jointly with that of Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal, or First Secretary of State.

Leader of the House of Lords

Shadow Leader of the House of LordsDeputy Leader of the House of LordsLeader
In recent years it has been most typical for the Lord President also to serve as Leader of the House of Commons or Leader of the House of Lords.
The role is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, usually one of the sinecure offices of Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.

Cabinet of the United Kingdom

CabinetBritish Cabinetcabinet minister
In the modern era, the holder is by convention always a member of one of the Houses of Parliament, and the office is normally a Cabinet post. Andrea Leadsom's appointment in June 2017 was the first in some time where the post holder was not a full Cabinet member.
Certain other cabinet ministers are in a somewhat hybrid position, where they have a portfolio, but do not head a government department; the Lord President of the Council being such an example, where that office has accreted a collection of responsibilities over time, but which does not have a Lord President's Department attached to it.

Edmund Dudley

Edmond Dudleyhis fatherSir Edmond Dudley
(Although there is a reference to Edmund Dudley serving as 'president of the council' in 1497, it was only in 1529 that the role was given the style and precedence of a Great Officer of State by Act of Parliament (An Act that the President of the King's Counsel shall be associate with the Chancellor and Treasurer of England, and the Keeper of the King's Privy Seal). ) Prior to 1679 there were several periods in which the office was left vacant.
He served as Speaker of the House of Commons and President of the King's Council.

Ramsay MacDonald

MacDonaldJames Ramsay MacDonaldRt Hon. Ramsay MacDonald
During times of National or Coalition Government the office of Lord President has sometimes been held by the leader of a minority party (e.g. Baldwin 1931-1935, MacDonald 1935-1937, Attlee 1943-1945, Clegg 2010-2015).
His health deteriorated and he stood down as Prime Minister in 1935 and remained as Lord President of the Council until retiring in 1937.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom

Privy CouncilPCPrivy Counsellor
The Lord President usually attends and is responsible for presiding over meetings of the Privy Council, presenting business for the monarch's approval.
The members of the Council are collectively known as The Lords of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council (sometimes The Lords and others of ...). The chief officer of the body is the Lord President of the Council, who is the fourth highest Great Officer of State, a Cabinet member and normally, either the Leader of the House of Lords or of the House of Commons.

Visitor

Board of VisitorsvisitationOfficial Visitor
The Lord President also serves as the Visitor for several British universities, including:
Many visitors hold their role ex officio, by serving as the British sovereign, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lord Chancellor, the Lord President of the Council, the Lord Chief Justice, or the bishop of a particular diocese.

Andrea Leadsom

Andrea '''LeadsomRt Hon. Andrea Leadsom
Andrea Leadsom's appointment in June 2017 was the first in some time where the post holder was not a full Cabinet member.
Following the snap election of 2017, Leadsom was appointed Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons.

John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland

Duke of NorthumberlandJohn DudleyEarl of Warwick
As Lord President of the Council, Dudley headed a distinctly conciliar government and sought to introduce the adolescent King into business.

Great Officer of State

Great Officers of StateRoyal householdGreat Office
The Lord President of the Council is the fourth of the Great Officers of State of the United Kingdom, ranking below the Lord High Treasurer but above the Lord Privy Seal.

Stanley Baldwin

BaldwinStanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of BewdleyPrime Minister
During times of National or Coalition Government the office of Lord President has sometimes been held by the leader of a minority party (e.g. Baldwin 1931-1935, MacDonald 1935-1937, Attlee 1943-1945, Clegg 2010-2015).
This decision led to MacDonald's expulsion from his own party, and Baldwin, as Lord President of the Council, became de facto Prime Minister, deputising for the increasingly senile MacDonald, until he once again officially became Prime Minister in 1935.

John Sheffield, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normanby

John Sheffield, 3rd Earl of MulgraveDuke of BuckinghamJohn Sheffield
John Sheffield, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normanby, (7 April 164824 February 1721) was an English poet and Tory politician of the late Stuart period who served as Lord Privy Seal and Lord President of the Council.

John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville

Lord CarteretThe Lord CarteretCarteret
John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville, 7th Seigneur of Sark, (22 April 16902 January 1763), commonly known by his earlier title Lord Carteret, was a British statesman and Lord President of the Council from 1751 to 1763; he worked extremely closely with the Prime Minister of the country, Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington, in order to manage the various factions of the Government.

Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland

The Earl of SunderlandSunderlandLord Sunderland
He served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (1714–1717), Lord Privy Seal (1715–1716), Lord President of the Council (1717–1719) and First Lord of the Treasury (1718–1721).

Clement Attlee

AttleeEarl AttleeAttlee government
During times of National or Coalition Government the office of Lord President has sometimes been held by the leader of a minority party (e.g. Baldwin 1931-1935, MacDonald 1935-1937, Attlee 1943-1945, Clegg 2010-2015).
Attlee was initially the Lord Privy Seal, before becoming Britain's first ever Deputy Prime Minister in 1942, as well as becoming the Dominions Secretary and the Lord President of the Council.

Lord President's Committee

The Lord President served as chairman of the Lord President's Committee.
Because of this it was always headed by a senior politician and became one of the responsibilities given to successive Lord Presidents of the Council.

William Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Devonshire

The Duke of DevonshireMarquess of HartingtonWilliam Cavendish
A prominent Whig, he was sworn of the Privy Council in 1707, and served as Lord President of the Council from 1716 to 1717 and 1725 to 1729.

Laurence Hyde, 1st Earl of Rochester

Laurence HydeThe Earl of RochesterEarl of Rochester
As a consequence Rochester was, in August 1684, removed from office and given the post Lord President of the Council, a more dignified but less lucrative and important office.

Peter Mandelson

Lord MandelsonThe Lord MandelsonLord Mandleson
Before the United Kingdom general election, 2010, the Lord President was Peter Mandelson, who was also First Secretary of State and Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.
In a Cabinet reshuffle on 5 June 2009 Mandelson was granted the honorific title of First Secretary of State and appointed Lord President of the Council; it was also announced that the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills would be merged into his, giving him the new title of Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, and that he would continue as President of the Board of Trade.

Nick Clegg

CleggNick Clegg MPCleggmania
During times of National or Coalition Government the office of Lord President has sometimes been held by the leader of a minority party (e.g. Baldwin 1931-1935, MacDonald 1935-1937, Attlee 1943-1945, Clegg 2010-2015).
Clegg became Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Lord President of the Council on 11 May 2010 through a coalition with the Conservative Party under Prime Minister David Cameron.

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke

The Earl of PembrokeEarl of PembrokeThomas Herbert
On two occasions he was Lord High Admiral for a short period; he was also Lord President of the Council and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, while he acted as one of the Lords Justices seven times; and he was President of the Royal Society in 1689–1690.

Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull

Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Marquess of DorchesterThe Duke of KingstonThe Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull
He was made a privy councillor and in 1715 was created Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull; afterwards serving as Lord Privy Seal and Lord President of the Council.