Lord Randolph Churchill

Randolph ChurchillLord Randolph Henry Spencer-ChurchillLordLord '''Randolph ChurchillLord RandolphLord Randolph Henry Spencer ChurchillLord Randolph Spencer-ChurchillRandolphiansRH Spencer-ChurchillSpencer-Churchill
Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill (13 February 1849 – 24 January 1895) was a British statesman.wikipedia
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Winston Churchill

ChurchillSir Winston ChurchillChurchill, Winston
His elder son, Winston, wrote a biography of him in 1906.
His own father, Lord Randolph Churchill, had been elected Conservative MP for Woodstock in 1873.

George Spencer-Churchill, 8th Duke of Marlborough

George Charles Spencer-Churchill, 8th Duke of Marlborough8th Duke of MarlboroughLord Blandford
A year later he and his elder brother, George, were initiated into the rites of Freemasonry, as later his son Winston would be.
He was the elder brother of Lord Randolph Churchill and the uncle of Winston Churchill.

Lady Randolph Churchill

Jennie JeromeJennieJennie Churchill
Lord Randolph Churchill was married at the British Embassy in Paris on 15 April 1874 to Jennie Jerome, daughter of Leonard Jerome, an American businessman.
Jennie Spencer-Churchill (9 January 1854 – 29 June 1921), known as Lady Randolph Churchill, was an American-born British socialite, the wife of Lord Randolph Churchill and the mother of British prime minister Sir Winston Churchill.

Cheam School

CheamCheam grammar schoolCheam Preparatory School
He was at first privately educated, and later attended Tabor's Preparatory School, Cheam.
Randolph Churchill, Conservative cabinet minister and father of Winston Churchill

Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery

Lord RoseberyEarl of RoseberyThe Earl of Rosebery
Among the lifelong friendships he made at school were with Edward Hamilton and Archibald Primrose (later Lord Rosebery).
Rosebery turned to writing, including biographies of Lord Chatham, Pitt the Younger, Napoleon, and Lord Randolph Churchill.

John Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough

The Duke of Marlborough7th Duke of MarlboroughDuke of Marlborough
Born at 3 Wilton Terrace, Belgravia, London, Randolph Spencer was the third son of the 7th Duke of Marlborough, and his wife, Lady Frances Vane.
Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill (13 February 1849 – 24 January 1895), married 15 April 1874 Jennie Jerome. Their issue included Sir Winston Churchill and John Strange Spencer-Churchill.

Macdonald Randolph Hotel

Randolph HotelRandolph
Randolph was frequently in trouble with the university authorities for drunkenness, smoking in academic dress, and smashing windows at the Randolph Hotel.
The hotel was named not after Lord Randolph Churchill, who was connected with Blenheim Palace to the north of Oxford, but after Dr Francis Randolph, an eighteenth century university benefactor.

My Life and Loves

My Life and Loves: Five Volumes in One/Complete and Unexpurgated
According to Frank Harris, who published the allegation in his scandalous autobiography, My Life and Loves (1922-27), "Randolph had caught syphilis..."
Contemporary and historic figures discussed frequently in the book include Robert Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Thomas Carlyle, Joseph Chamberlain, Lord Randolph Churchill, Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke, Lord Folkestone, William Ewart Gladstone, Heinrich Heine, George Meredith, Charles Stewart Parnell, Cecil Rhodes, Lord Salisbury, Byron Caldwell Smith, Algernon Charles Swinburne, Oscar Wilde, and many others.

Oscar Clayton

Dr Oscar ClaytonMr Oscar ClaytonSir Oscar Clayton
In January 1875, only about a month after Winston's birth, Randolph made repeated visits for an undisclosed ailment to the family doctor, Dr Oscar Clayton, a specialist in the treatment of syphilis at his London practice at 5,Harley Street.
His patients included Lord Randolph Churchill, who shortly after the birth of his son Winston made repeated visits to Clayton for "an undisclosed ailment".

Arthur Balfour

BalfourLord BalfourA.J. Balfour
Along with Henry Drummond Wolff, John Gorst and occasionally Arthur Balfour, he made himself known as the audacious opponent of the Liberal administration and the unsparing critic of the Conservative front bench.
He was for a time politically associated with Lord Randolph Churchill, Sir Henry Drummond Wolff and John Gorst.

Merton College, Oxford

Merton CollegeMertonSt Alban Hall
In October 1867, he matriculated and was admitted at Merton College, Oxford.
Lord Randolph Churchill, Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons (and father of Winston Churchill), matriculated in October 1867, while Max Beerbohm, an English essayist, parodist, and caricaturist studied at Merton in the 1890s and was Secretary of the Myrmidon Club.

Primrose League

He gave constant attention to the party organisation, which had fallen into considerable disorder after 1880, and was an active promoter of the Primrose League, which owed its origin to the inspiration of one of his own “fourth party” colleagues.
Sir Henry Drummond Wolff said to Lord Randolph Churchill, "Let us found a primrose league".

William Ewart Gladstone

GladstoneWilliam GladstoneW. E. Gladstone
He continued to play a conspicuous part throughout the parliament of 1880-85, targeting William Ewart Gladstone as well as the Conservative front bench, some of whose members, particularly Sir Richard Cross and William Henry Smith, he singled out for attack when they opposed the reduced Army estimates. In the contest which arose over William Ewart Gladstone's Home Rule bill, Lord Randolph again bore a conspicuous part, and in the electioneering campaign his activity was only second to that of some of the Liberal Unionists, Lord Hartington, George Goschen and Joseph Chamberlain.
Eventually, he became notorious for this activity, prompting Lord Randolph Churchill to observe: "For the purposes of recreation he has selected the felling of trees; and we may usefully remark that his amusements, like his politics, are essentially destructive. Every afternoon the whole world is invited to assist at the crashing fall of some beech or elm or oak. The forest laments in order that Mr Gladstone may perspire."

Paddington South (UK Parliament constituency)

Paddington SouthSouth Paddington1930 Paddington South by-election
In the autumn election of 1885 he contested Birmingham Central against John Bright, and though defeated here, was at the same time returned by a very large majority for South Paddington.
It was a compact urban area, but predominantly wealthy, and was most famously represented by Lord Randolph Churchill during the latter part of his career.

Bullingdon Club

Bollinger ClubBullingdonThe Bullingdon Club
At Oxford, Primrose, now Lord Dalmeny, joined him at the champagne-fuelled parties as members of the Bullingdon Club.
Lord Randolph Churchill, Chancellor of the Exchequer (1886).

John Eldon Gorst

Sir John Eldon GorstJohn GorstSir John Gorst
Along with Henry Drummond Wolff, John Gorst and occasionally Arthur Balfour, he made himself known as the audacious opponent of the Liberal administration and the unsparing critic of the Conservative front bench.
He joined Sir Henry Drummond-Wolff, Lord Randolph Churchill and Arthur Balfour in the Fourth Party as an advocate of Tory democracy.

L'Abbesse de Jouarre

He was an ardent patron of horse-racing and in 1889, his horse L'Abbesse de Jouarre won The Oaks.
The horse was owned by Lord Randolph Churchill and the Earl of Dunraven during her three-year racing career.

Stafford Northcote, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh

Sir Stafford NorthcoteStafford NorthcoteSir Stafford Northcote, Bt
He made a series of furious attacks on Sir Stafford Northcote, R. A. Cross, and other prominent members of the "old gang".
His temper as leader was, however, too gentle to satisfy the more ardent spirits among his own followers, and party cabals (in which Lord Randolph Churchill, who had made a dead set at the "old gang", took a leading part) led to Northcote's elevation to the Lords in 1885, when Lord Salisbury became prime minister.

Liberal Unionist Party

Liberal UnionistLiberal UnionistsUnionist
In the contest which arose over William Ewart Gladstone's Home Rule bill, Lord Randolph again bore a conspicuous part, and in the electioneering campaign his activity was only second to that of some of the Liberal Unionists, Lord Hartington, George Goschen and Joseph Chamberlain.
In December 1886, when Lord Randolph Churchill suddenly resigned as Chancellor of the Exchequer, Salisbury offered the position to Goschen, by far the most conservative of the leading Liberal Unionists.

Woodstock (UK Parliament constituency)

WoodstockNew WoodstockNew Woodstock (seat 1/2)
At the general election of 1874 he was elected to Parliament as Conservative member for Woodstock, near the family seat, defeating George Brodrick, a Fellow, and afterwards Warden, of Merton.

Leonard Jerome

Leonard W. Jerome
Lord Randolph Churchill was married at the British Embassy in Paris on 15 April 1874 to Jennie Jerome, daughter of Leonard Jerome, an American businessman.
Lady Randolph Churchill (née Jeanette Jerome; known as Jennie), who married Lord Randolph Churchill (1849–1895), younger son of the Duke of Marlborough, and was mother to Winston Churchill and John Strange Spencer-Churchill.

Frances Anne Spencer-Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough

Lady Frances VaneLady Frances Anne Emily VaneDuchess of Marlborough
Born at 3 Wilton Terrace, Belgravia, London, Randolph Spencer was the third son of the 7th Duke of Marlborough, and his wife, Lady Frances Vane.
One of her sons, Lord Randolph Churchill was the father of Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill.

Charles Stewart Parnell

ParnellParnellite1890
He was equally severe on the domestic policy of the administration, and was particularly bitter in his criticism of the Kilmainham Treaty and the rapprochement between the Gladstonians and the Parnellites.
The Conservatives now emerged as enthusiastic unionists, Lord Randolph Churchill declared, "The Orange card is the one to play".

Joseph Chamberlain

ChamberlainJoseph The Right Honourable '''Joseph Chamberlain
In the contest which arose over William Ewart Gladstone's Home Rule bill, Lord Randolph again bore a conspicuous part, and in the electioneering campaign his activity was only second to that of some of the Liberal Unionists, Lord Hartington, George Goschen and Joseph Chamberlain.
Despite being endorsed by Tory Democrats Lord Randolph Churchill and John Eldon Gorst, the Liberal government was unwilling to grant Chamberlain its full support and the Bill was withdrawn in July 1884.

Secretary of State for India

Secretary of State for India and BurmaSecretary of StateIndia Secretary
His services were, at any rate, far too important to be refused recognition; and in Lord Salisbury's "caretaker" cabinet he was made Secretary of State for India on 24June 1885.