Louis Brandeis

BrandeisJustice BrandeisLouis Dembitz BrandeisLouis D. BrandeisJustice Louis BrandeisLouis D BrandeisBrandeis JBrandeisesBrandeis J.Brandeis Research Fellowship
Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American lawyer and associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1916 to 1939.wikipedia
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Harvard Law Review

Harv. L. Rev.Harvard Law Review AssociationLaw Review
Starting in 1890, he helped develop the "right to privacy" concept by writing a Harvard Law Review article of that title, and was thereby credited by legal scholar Roscoe Pound as having accomplished "nothing less than adding a chapter to our law".
The establishment of the journal was largely due to the support of Louis Brandeis, then a recent Harvard Law School alumnus and Boston attorney who would later go on to become a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

The Right to Privacy (article)

The Right to Privacythat titleThe Right to Privacy,
Starting in 1890, he helped develop the "right to privacy" concept by writing a Harvard Law Review article of that title, and was thereby credited by legal scholar Roscoe Pound as having accomplished "nothing less than adding a chapter to our law".
15, 1890)) is a law review article written by Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis, and published in the 1890 Harvard Law Review.

Other People's Money and How the Bankers Use It

other people's moneypopularized in 1913
He later published a book entitled Other People's Money and How the Bankers Use It, suggesting ways of curbing the power of large banks and money trusts.
Other People's Money And How the Bankers Use It (1914) is a collection of essays written by Louis Brandeis first published as a book in 1914, and reissued in 1933.

Brandeis Brief

briefhis briefs
He achieved recognition by submitting a case brief, later called the "Brandeis Brief", which relied on expert testimony from people in other professions to support his case, thereby setting a new precedent in evidence presentation.
It is named after then-litigator and eventual associate Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, who presented it in his argument for the 1908 US Supreme Court case Muller v. Oregon.

Right to privacy

invasion of privacyprivacy rightsright of privacy
Starting in 1890, he helped develop the "right to privacy" concept by writing a Harvard Law Review article of that title, and was thereby credited by legal scholar Roscoe Pound as having accomplished "nothing less than adding a chapter to our law".
In the United States, an article in the December 15, 1890 issue of the Harvard Law Review, written by attorney Samuel D. Warren and future U.S. Supreme Court Justice, Louis Brandeis, entitled "The Right to Privacy", is often cited as the first explicit declaration of a U.S. right to privacy.

Lewis Naphtali Dembitz

According to biographer Melvin Urofsky, Brandeis was influenced greatly by his uncle Lewis Naphtali Dembitz.
His nephew Louis Brandeis, who admired him greatly, chose law as a profession because of Dembitz.

Nutter McClennen & Fish

Brandeis Dunbar & Nutter
Brandeis settled in Boston, where he founded a law firm (that is still in practice today as Nutter McClennen & Fish) and became a recognized lawyer through his work on progressive social causes.
The law firm was founded in 1879 by Harvard Law School classmates Samuel D. Warren and Louis Brandeis.

Harvard Law School

Harvard LawHarvardHarvard University Law School
He attended Harvard Law School, graduating at the age of 20 with what is widely rumored to be the highest grade average in the law school's history.
Past Supreme Court justices from Harvard Law School include Antonin Scalia, David Souter, Harry Blackmun, William J. Brennan, Louis Brandeis, Felix Frankfurter, Lewis Powell (LLM), and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., among others.

Woodrow Wilson

WilsonPresident WilsonPresident Woodrow Wilson
In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson nominated Brandeis to become a member of the Supreme Court.
In 1916, Wilson nominated Louis Brandeis to the Court, setting off a major debate in the Senate over Brandeis's progressive ideology and his religion; Brandeis was the first Jewish nominee to the Supreme Court.

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

Associate JusticeJusticeAssociate Justice of the Supreme Court
Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American lawyer and associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1916 to 1939. His nomination was bitterly contested, partly because, as Justice William O. Douglas wrote, "Brandeis was a militant crusader for social justice whoever his opponent might be. He was dangerous not only because of his brilliance, his arithmetic, his courage. He was dangerous because he was incorruptible ... [and] the fears of the Establishment were greater because Brandeis was the first Jew to be named to the Court."

Louisville Male High School

MaleMale High SchoolLouisville Male
Brandeis graduated from the Louisville Male High School at age 14 with the highest honors.

William O. Douglas

DouglasJustice DouglasJustice William Douglas
His nomination was bitterly contested, partly because, as Justice William O. Douglas wrote, "Brandeis was a militant crusader for social justice whoever his opponent might be. He was dangerous not only because of his brilliance, his arithmetic, his courage. He was dangerous because he was incorruptible ... [and] the fears of the Establishment were greater because Brandeis was the first Jew to be named to the Court."
After serving as the third chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Douglas was successfully nominated to the Supreme Court, succeeding Justice Louis Brandeis.

Efficiency movement

Bedaux SystemEfficiencyNational Efficiency
He argued that great size conflicted with efficiency and added a new dimension to the Efficiency Movement of the Progressive Era.
Boston lawyer Louis Brandeis (1856–1941) argued bigness conflicted with efficiency and added a new political dimension to the Efficiency Movement.

Samuel D. Warren

Samuel WarrenSamuel Dennis Warren IIWarren
After seven months, he tired of the minor casework and accepted an offer by his Harvard classmate, Samuel D. Warren, to set up a law firm in Boston.
The first-place student was his friend Louis Brandeis, later a justice of the United States Supreme Court.

J. P. Morgan

J.P. MorganJ. Pierpont MorganJohn Pierpont Morgan
The New Haven had been under the control of J. P. Morgan, the "most powerful of all American bankers and probably the most dominating figure in all of American business."
The partners of J.P. Morgan & Co. and directors of First National and National City Bank controlled aggregate resources of $22.245 billion, which Louis Brandeis, later a U.S. Supreme Court Justice, compared to the value of all the property in the twenty-two states west of the Mississippi River.

Felix Frankfurter

FrankfurterJustice FrankfurterFrankfurter J
In succeeding years his right of privacy concepts gained powerful disciples who relied on his dissenting opinion: Justice Frank Murphy, in 1942, used his Harvard Law Review article in writing an opinion for the Court; a few years later, Justice Felix Frankfurter referred to the Fourth Amendment as the "protection of the right to be let alone," as in the 1947 case of United States v. Harris, where his opinion wove together the speeches of James Otis, James Madison, John Adams, and Brandeis's Olmstead opinion, proclaiming the right of privacy as "second to none in the Bill of Rights
He became lifelong friends with Walter Lippmann and Horace Kallen, became an editor of the Harvard Law Review, and graduated with one of the best academic records since Louis Brandeis.

Roscoe Pound

PoundR PoundDean Roscoe Pound
Starting in 1890, he helped develop the "right to privacy" concept by writing a Harvard Law Review article of that title, and was thereby credited by legal scholar Roscoe Pound as having accomplished "nothing less than adding a chapter to our law".

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.

Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.Oliver Wendell HolmesHolmes
Both Brandeis and Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. often dissented and became known for consistently challenging the majority's view.
In the fall of 1882, Holmes became a professor at Harvard Law School, accepting an endowed professorship which had been created for him, largely through the efforts of Louis D. Brandeis.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American lawyer and associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1916 to 1939.
The first Catholic justice was Roger Taney in 1836, and 1916 saw the appointment of the first Jewish justice, Louis Brandeis.

Harlan F. Stone

Harlan Fiske StoneHarlan StoneChief Justice Stone
Along with Benjamin Cardozo and Harlan F. Stone, Brandeis was considered to be in the liberal wing of the court—the so-called Three Musketeers who stood against the conservative Four Horsemen.
On the Taft Court, Stone joined with Justices Holmes and Brandeis in calling for judicial restraint and deference to the legislative will.

Clear and present danger

clear and immediate dangerclear and present danger testclear and present effect
Justice Holmes developed the concept of "clear and present danger" as the test any restriction on speech had to meet.
In Abrams, Holmes and Justice Brandeis dissented and encouraged the use of the clear and present test, which provided more protection for speech.

New Deal

The New DealHundred Days Congressfirst hundred days
According to John Vile, in the final years of his career, like the rest of the Court, he "initially combated the New Deal of Franklin D. Roosevelt, which went against everything Brandeis had ever preached in opposition to the concepts of 'bigness' and 'centralization' in the federal government and the need to return to the states."
Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, an influential adviser to many New Dealers, argued that "bigness" (referring, presumably, to corporations) was a negative economic force, producing waste and inefficiency.

American Jewish Congress

American Jewish CommitteeJewish congressJewish-American Congress
On June 10, 1917, 335,000 American Jews cast their votes and elected their delegates who, together with representatives of some 30 national organizations, established the American Jewish Congress on a democratically elected basis, but further efforts to organize awaited the end of the war.
Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, Felix Frankfurter, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, and others joined to lay the groundwork for a national democratic organization of Jewish leaders from all over the country, to rally for equal rights for all Americans regardless of race, religion, or national ancestry.

Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk

Tomáš MasarykT. G. MasarykThomas Garrigue Masaryk
In October 1918 he helped Thomas Garrigue Masaryk to create "Washington Declaration" for the founding of a new independent Czechoslovak state.
In 18 October 1918 he submitted to president Thomas Woodrow Wilson "Washington Declaration" (Czechoslovak declaration of independence) created with the help of Masaryk American friends (Louis Brandeis, Ira Bennett, Gutzon Borglum, Franklin K. Lane, Edward House, Herbert Adolphus Miller, Charles W. Nichols, Robert M. Calfee, Frank E. J. Warrick, George W. Stearn and Czech Jaroslav Císař) as the basic document for the foundation of a new independent Czechoslovak state.

Brandeis University

BrandeisHadassah-Brandeis InstituteSteinhardt Social Research Institute
The university is named after Louis Brandeis, the first Jewish Justice of the US Supreme Court.