Louisa Twining c. 1906
Former workhouse in Nantwich, dating from 1780

The group was set up by Louisa Twining of the Twinings tea family.

- Workhouse Visiting Society

In March 1861, she helped to establish a home for workhouse girls sent out to service, in 1864 the Workhouse Visiting Society, in 1866 the Association for the Improvement of the Infirmaries of London Workhouses and in 1879 the Workhouse Infirmary Nursing Association.

- Louisa Twining
Louisa Twining c. 1906

16 related topics

Relevance

Engraving of Tait published 1879

Catharine Tait

British philanthropist.

British philanthropist.

Engraving of Tait published 1879

Her experience was consulted when Louisa Twining formed the Workhouse Visiting Society with wider ambitions.

Twinings' shop on the Strand in central London was established as a tea room in 1706

Twinings

British marketer of tea and other beverages, including coffee, hot chocolate and malt drinks, based in Andover, Hampshire.

British marketer of tea and other beverages, including coffee, hot chocolate and malt drinks, based in Andover, Hampshire.

Twinings' shop on the Strand in central London was established as a tea room in 1706
Twinings' shop on the Strand in central London was established as a tea room in 1706

Louisa Twining (1820–1912), social reformer

Although many deterrent workhouses developed in the period after the New Poor Law, some had already been built under the existing system. This workhouse in Nantwich, Cheshire, dates from 1780.

English Poor Laws

The English Poor Laws were a system of poor relief in England and Wales that developed out of the codification of late-medieval and Tudor-era laws in 1587–1598.

The English Poor Laws were a system of poor relief in England and Wales that developed out of the codification of late-medieval and Tudor-era laws in 1587–1598.

Although many deterrent workhouses developed in the period after the New Poor Law, some had already been built under the existing system. This workhouse in Nantwich, Cheshire, dates from 1780.
The Poor Laws in the aftermath of the Black Death (pictured), when labour was in short supply, were concerned with making the able-bodied work. (also see: Sturdy beggar)
The Old Poor Law or Elizabethan Poor Law is sometimes referred to as the "43rd Elizabeth" as it was passed in the 43rd year that Elizabeth I (pictured) reigned as Queen.
Advertisement for builders to build a new Workhouse in north Wales, 1829
Nassau William Senior argued for greater centralization of the Poor Law system.
Infighting between Edwin Chadwick and other Poor Law Commissioners was one reason for an overhaul of Poor Law administration.
David Lloyd George, architect of the Liberal welfare reforms which were implemented outside of the Poor Law system and paved the way for the eventual abolition of the Poor Law.
Punch criticized the New Poor Law's workhouses for splitting mothers and their infant children.

The Workhouse Visiting Society which formed in 1858 highlighted conditions in workhouses and led to workhouses being inspected more often.

The Women's Library reading room in the LSE library

Women's Library

England's main library and museum resource on women and the women's movement, concentrating on Britain in the 19th and 20th centuries.

England's main library and museum resource on women and the women's movement, concentrating on Britain in the 19th and 20th centuries.

The Women's Library reading room in the LSE library
Mary Robinson (former President of Ireland) and librarian Elizabeth Chapman at the opening of the new Women's Library reading room at LSE, 12 March 2014

Personal archives held at the Women's Library include those of Lesley Abdela, Adelaide Anderson, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, Louisa Garrett Anderson, Margery Corbett Ashby, Lydia Becker, Helen Bentwich, Rosa May Billinghurst, Chili Bouchier, Elsie Bowerman, Josephine Butler, Barbara Cartland, Jill Craigie, Emily Wilding Davison, Charlotte Despard, Emily Faithfull, Millicent Garrett Fawcett, Vida Goldstein, Teresa Billington-Greig, Elspeth Howe, Hazel Hunkins Hallinan, Mary Lowndes (see also Artists' Suffrage League Papers), Constance Lytton, Harriet Martineau, Edith How-Martyn, Angela Mason, Hannah More, Helena Normanton, Eleanor Rathbone, Claire Rayner, Sheila Rowbotham, Maude Royden, Myra Sadd Brown, Nancy Seear, Baroness Seear, Elaine Showalter, William Thomas Stead, Mary Stott, Louisa Twining and Henry Wilson.

Richard Twining Turner

Richard Twining (tea merchant, born 1772)

British tea merchant.

British tea merchant.

Richard Twining Turner

He and his wife had nine children, including the social reformer Louisa Twining, and the botanical illustrator Elizabeth Twining.

Portrait of Elizabeth Twining

Elizabeth Twining

English painter, author, and botanical illustrator.

English painter, author, and botanical illustrator.

Portrait of Elizabeth Twining

Elizabeth was an elder sister of the social reformer Louisa Twining.

Plaque commemorating Dr Joseph Rogers in Dean Street, London

Association for the Improvement of the Infirmaries of London Workhouses

Established on 3 March 1866 at a public meeting organised by Joseph Rogers, and Drs.

Established on 3 March 1866 at a public meeting organised by Joseph Rogers, and Drs.

Plaque commemorating Dr Joseph Rogers in Dean Street, London

Louisa Twining, the Archbishop of York and two earls were among the members.

Photo by Alexander Bassano, c. undefined 1882

Workhouse Infirmary Nursing Association

Created in 1879 to organise training and act as an employment agency for nurses in Poor law infirmaries and workhouses.

Created in 1879 to organise training and act as an employment agency for nurses in Poor law infirmaries and workhouses.

Photo by Alexander Bassano, c. undefined 1882

Louisa Twining and Florence Nightingale were involved with its formation.

Former workhouse in Nantwich, dating from 1780

Workhouse infirmary

Workhouse infirmaries were established in the nineteenth century in England.

Workhouse infirmaries were established in the nineteenth century in England.

Former workhouse in Nantwich, dating from 1780

The Workhouse Visiting Society was set up in 1858 exposed the poor standards of nursing care.

Madeleine Shaw Lefevre, 1890 portrait

Madeleine Shaw Lefevre

The Principal of Somerville Hall for its first 10 years, from 1879 to 1889.

The Principal of Somerville Hall for its first 10 years, from 1879 to 1889.

Madeleine Shaw Lefevre, 1890 portrait

The Countess was a founding member of the Workhouse Visiting Society, and through this connection Shaw Lefevre became a member of the central committee of the Metropolitan Association for Befriending Young Servants.