Louisiana (New France)

LouisianaFrench LouisianaLa LouisianeLouisianeFrenchLower Louisianacolony of LouisianaLouisiana TerritoryLouisiana colonyNew France
Louisiana (La Louisiane; La Louisiane française) or French Louisiana was an administrative district of New France.wikipedia
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New France

FrenchCanadaNouvelle-France
Louisiana (La Louisiane; La Louisiane française) or French Louisiana was an administrative district of New France.
The territory of New France consisted of five colonies at its peak in 1712, each with its own administration: Canada, the most developed colony and divided into the districts of Québec, Trois-Rivières, and Montréal; Hudson's Bay; Acadie in the northeast; Plaisance on the island of Newfoundland; and Louisiane.

Louisiana Purchase

LouisianaLouisiana TerritorySale of Louisiana
Strained by obligations in Europe, Napoleon Bonaparte sold the territory to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, ending France's presence in Louisiana.
The Louisiana Purchase (Vente de la Louisiane 'Sale of Louisiana') was the acquisition of the territory of Louisiana by the United States from France in 1803.

Louisiana

LAState of LouisianaLouisiana, USA
The U.S. state of Louisiana is named for the historical region, although it is only a small part of the vast lands claimed by France. Within this vast territory, only two areas saw substantial French settlement: Upper Louisiana (Haute-Louisiane), also known as the Illinois Country (Pays des Illinois), which consisted of settlements in what are now the states of Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana; and Lower Louisiana, which comprised parts of the modern states of Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama.
Before the American purchase of the territory in 1803, the present-day State of Louisiana had been both a French colony and for a brief period a Spanish one.

Missouri

MOState of MissouriMissouri, USA
Within this vast territory, only two areas saw substantial French settlement: Upper Louisiana (Haute-Louisiane), also known as the Illinois Country (Pays des Illinois), which consisted of settlements in what are now the states of Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana; and Lower Louisiana, which comprised parts of the modern states of Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama.
The French established Louisiana, a part of New France, founding Ste. Genevieve in 1735 and St. Louis in 1764.

Alabama

ALState of AlabamaAlabamian
Within this vast territory, only two areas saw substantial French settlement: Upper Louisiana (Haute-Louisiane), also known as the Illinois Country (Pays des Illinois), which consisted of settlements in what are now the states of Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana; and Lower Louisiana, which comprised parts of the modern states of Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama.
The oldest city is Mobile, founded by French colonists in 1702 as the capital of French Louisiana.

New Orleans

New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans, LAOrleans Parish
A colonial government soon emerged, with its capital originally at Mobile, later at Biloxi and finally at New Orleans (in 1722, four years after the city's founding).
Founded in 1718 by French colonists, New Orleans was once the territorial capital of French Louisiana before being traded to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

Fort Maurepas

Old BiloxiFort of Biloxi
The French first explored it in the 1660s, and a few trading posts were established in the following years; serious attempt at settlement began with the establishment of Fort Maurepas, near modern Biloxi, Mississippi, in 1699.
was developed in colonial French Louisiana (New France) in April 1699 along the Gulf of Mexico.

Mobile, Alabama

MobileMobile, ALFort Louis de la Mobile
A colonial government soon emerged, with its capital originally at Mobile, later at Biloxi and finally at New Orleans (in 1722, four years after the city's founding).
Mobile was founded in 1702 by the French as the first capital of Louisiana.

Illinois

ILState of IllinoisIll.
Within this vast territory, only two areas saw substantial French settlement: Upper Louisiana (Haute-Louisiane), also known as the Illinois Country (Pays des Illinois), which consisted of settlements in what are now the states of Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana; and Lower Louisiana, which comprised parts of the modern states of Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama.
French Empire Canadiens came south to settle particularly along the Mississippi River, and Illinois was part of first New France, and then of La Louisiane until 1763, when it passed to the British with their defeat of France in the Seven Years' War.

Spanish Florida

FloridaLa FloridaSecond Spanish Period
As a result of its defeat in the Seven Years' War, France was forced to cede the east part of the territory in 1763 to the victorious British, and the west part to Spain as compensation for Spain losing Florida. In the 1762 Treaty of Fontainebleau, France ceded Louisiana west of the Mississippi River to Spain, its ally in the war, as compensation for the loss of Spanish Florida to Britain.
The establishment of the Province of Carolina by the English in 1639, New Orleans by the French in 1718, and of the Province of Georgia by Great Britain in 1732 limited the boundaries of Florida over Spanish objections.

Illinois Country

Upper LouisianaPays des IllinoisIllinois
Within this vast territory, only two areas saw substantial French settlement: Upper Louisiana (Haute-Louisiane), also known as the Illinois Country (Pays des Illinois), which consisted of settlements in what are now the states of Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana; and Lower Louisiana, which comprised parts of the modern states of Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama. Louisiana included two regions, now known as Upper Louisiana (la Haute-Louisiane), which began north of the Arkansas River, and Lower Louisiana (la Basse-Louisiane). The earliest settlers of Upper Louisiana mostly came from French Canada, while Lower Louisiana was colonized by people from all over the French colonial empire, with various waves coming from Canada, France, and the French West Indies.
Up until 1717, the Illinois Country was governed by the French province of Canada, but by order of King Louis XV, the Illinois Country was annexed to the French province of Louisiana, with the northeastern administrative border being somewhat vaguely on or near the upper Illinois River.

Biloxi, Mississippi

BiloxiBiloxi, MSBiloxi Bay
A colonial government soon emerged, with its capital originally at Mobile, later at Biloxi and finally at New Orleans (in 1722, four years after the city's founding). The French first explored it in the 1660s, and a few trading posts were established in the following years; serious attempt at settlement began with the establishment of Fort Maurepas, near modern Biloxi, Mississippi, in 1699.
In 1699 French colonists formed the first permanent settlement in French Louisiana, at Fort Maurepas, now in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, and referred to as "Old Biloxi".

Canada (New France)

CanadaColony of CanadaNew France
Generally speaking, the French colony of Louisiana bordered the Great Lakes, particularly Lake Michigan and Lake Erie towards the north; this region was the "Upper Country" of the French province of Canada.
The other four colonies within New France were Hudson's Bay to the north, Acadia and Newfoundland to the east, and Louisiana far to the south.

French colonial empire

FrenchFrench EmpireFrance
The earliest settlers of Upper Louisiana mostly came from French Canada, while Lower Louisiana was colonized by people from all over the French colonial empire, with various waves coming from Canada, France, and the French West Indies.
In 1699, French territorial claims in North America expanded still further, with the foundation of Louisiana in the basin of the Mississippi River.

Midwestern United States

MidwestMidwesternAmerican Midwest
In the 18th century, Louisiana included most of the Mississippi River basin (see drawing alongside) from what is now the Midwestern United States south to the coast of the Gulf of Mexico.
Napoleon had lost interest in re-establishing a French colonial empire in North America following the Haitian Revolution and together with the fact that France could not effectively defend Louisiana from Great Britain, he sold the territory to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

Fort de Chartres

Fort ChartresChartresFort Cavendish
Between 1699 and 1760, six major settlements were established in Upper Louisiana: Cahokia, Kaskaskia, Fort de Chartres, Saint Philippe, and Prairie du Rocher, all on the east side of the Mississippi River in present-day Illinois; and Ste. Genevieve across the river in today's Missouri.
Due generally to river floods, the fort was rebuilt twice, the last time in limestone in the 1750s in the era of French colonial control over Louisiana and the Illinois Country.

Arkansas

ARState of ArkansasArkansan
Within this vast territory, only two areas saw substantial French settlement: Upper Louisiana (Haute-Louisiane), also known as the Illinois Country (Pays des Illinois), which consisted of settlements in what are now the states of Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana; and Lower Louisiana, which comprised parts of the modern states of Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama.
Napoleon Bonaparte sold French Louisiana to the United States in 1803, including all of Arkansas, in a transaction known today as the Louisiana Purchase.

Antoine Crozat

Louis-François Crozat, marquis du ChâtelLouis François Crozat, marquis du Châtel
The region was initially governed as part of Canada, but was declared to be part of Louisiana in 1712, with the grant of the Louisiana country to Antoine Crozat.
1655 – 7 June 1738), French founder of an immense fortune, was the first proprietary owner of French Louisiana, from 1712 to 1717.

Mississippi

MSState of MississippiGeography of Mississippi
Within this vast territory, only two areas saw substantial French settlement: Upper Louisiana (Haute-Louisiane), also known as the Illinois Country (Pays des Illinois), which consisted of settlements in what are now the states of Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana; and Lower Louisiana, which comprised parts of the modern states of Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama.
The French called the greater territory "New France"; the Spanish continued to claim part of the Gulf coast area (east of Mobile Bay) of present-day southern Alabama, in addition to the entire area of present-day Florida.

Vincennes, Indiana

VincennesPost VincennesVincennes, IN
Thus, Vincennes and Peoria were the limit of Louisiana's reach.
Later on, it would be transferred to the colony of Louisiana.

Alberta

Alberta, CanadaABAlberta Transportation
This section lies above the 49th parallel north in a part of present-day Alberta and Saskatchewan.
The extreme southernmost portion of Alberta was part of the French (and Spanish) territory of Louisiana, sold to the United States in 1803; in 1818, the portion of Louisiana north of the Forty-Ninth Parallel was ceded to Great Britain.

Louisiana (New Spain)

Spanish LouisianaLouisianaSpanish
Following the transfer of power (at which time many of the French settlers on the east bank of the Mississippi crossed the river to what had become Spanish Louisiana) the eastern Illinois Country became part of the British Province of Quebec, and later the United States' Northwest Territory.
The area had originally been claimed and controlled by France, which had named it La Louisiane in honor of King Louis XIV in 1682.

St. Louis

St. Louis, MissouriSt. Louis, MOSaint Louis, Missouri
Those fleeing from British control founded outposts such as the important settlement of St. Louis (1764).
Five years later, La Salle claimed the region for France as part of La Louisiane.

Treaty of Fontainebleau (1762)

Treaty of FontainebleauTreaty of Fontainebleau of 1762ceded
In the 1762 Treaty of Fontainebleau, France ceded Louisiana west of the Mississippi River to Spain, its ally in the war, as compensation for the loss of Spanish Florida to Britain.
The Treaty of Fontainebleau was a secret agreement of 1762 in which France ceded Louisiana to Spain.

Northwest Territory

Old NorthwestTerritory Northwest of the River OhioNorthwest
Following the transfer of power (at which time many of the French settlers on the east bank of the Mississippi crossed the river to what had become Spanish Louisiana) the eastern Illinois Country became part of the British Province of Quebec, and later the United States' Northwest Territory.
Lands west of the Mississippi River were the Louisiana Province of New France (acquired by the United States in 1803 by the Louisiana Purchase); lands north of the Great Lakes were the British Province of Upper Canada, and lands south of the Ohio River constituted Kentucky County, Virginia, admitted to the union as the state of Kentucky in 1792.