Loyalist (American Revolution)

LoyalistLoyalistsToriesToryAmerican LoyalistAmerican LoyalistsBritish LoyalistBritish LoyalistsloyalLoyalism
Loyalists were American colonists who stayed loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War, often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men at the time.wikipedia
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Dunmore's Proclamation

issued a proclamationLord Dunmore's Proclamationproclamation
As a result of the looming crisis in 1775 the Royal Governor of Virginia, Lord Dunmore, issued a proclamation that promised freedom to servants and slaves who were able to bear arms and join his Loyalist Ethiopian Regiment.
Formally proclaimed on November 15, its publication prompted a flood of slaves (from both patriot and loyalist owners) to run away and enlist with Dunmore; during the course of the war, between 80,000 and 100,000 slaves escaped from the plantations.

First Continental Congress

FirstContinental Congress1st Continental Congress
John Brown, an agent of the Boston Committee of Correspondence, worked with Canadian merchant Thomas Walker and other rebel sympathisers during the winter of 1774–1775 to convince inhabitants to support the actions of the First Continental Congress.
Loyalist sentiments outweighed Patriot views in Georgia, and that colony did not join the cause until the following year.

Scottish Americans

ScottishScottish AmericanScottish-American
Highland Scots in the Carolinas, a fair number of Anglican clergy and their parishioners in Connecticut and New York, a few Presbyterians in the southern colonies, and a large number of the Iroquois stayed loyal to the king.
The Scottish Highland communities of upstate New York and the Cape Fear valley of North Carolina were centers of Loyalist resistance.

Invasion of Quebec (1775)

invasion of Canadainvasion of QuebecInvasion of Canada (1775)
In late 1775 the Continental Army sent a force into Quebec, led by General Richard Montgomery and Colonel Benedict Arnold, with the goal of convincing the residents of Quebec to join the Revolution.
Arnold then conducted an ineffectual siege on the city, during which successful propaganda campaigns boosted Loyalist sentiments, and General David Wooster's blunt administration of Montreal served to annoy both supporters and detractors of the Americans.

Shelburne, Nova Scotia

ShelburneTownship of ShelburneTown of Shelburne
However, the inferior grants of land they were given and the prejudices of white Loyalists in nearby Shelburne who regularly harassed the settlement in events such as the Shelburne Riots in 1784, made life very difficult for the community.
These settlers were Loyalists (referred to later in Canada as United Empire Loyalists), British-American colonists who had opposed the Revolution and remained loyal to Britain.

Battle of Fort Cumberland

Eddy RebellionFort CumberlandSiege of Fort Cumberland
Britain in any case built up powerful forces at the naval base of Halifax after the failure of Jonathan Eddy to capture Fort Cumberland in 1776.
The successful defense of Fort Cumberland preserved the territorial integrity of the British Maritime possessions, and Nova Scotia remained loyal throughout the war.

Battles of Saratoga

Battle of SaratogaSaratogaBattle of Bemis Heights
In 1777, 1,500 Loyalist militia took part in the Saratoga campaign in New York, and surrendered with General Burgoyne after the Battles of Saratoga in October.
They decided to split the Thirteen Colonies and isolate New England from what they believed to be the more Loyalist middle and southern colonies.

Joseph Brant

ThayendanegeaBrantBrant, Joseph
The descendants of one such group of Iroquois, led by Joseph Brant (Thayendenegea), settled at Six Nations of the Grand River, the largest First Nations reserve in Canada.
During the American Revolutionary War, Brant led Mohawk and colonial Loyalists known as "Brant's Volunteers" against the rebels in a bitter partisan war on the New York frontier.

The Bahamas

BahamasBahamianBahama Islands
Many Southern Loyalists, taking along their slaves, went to the West Indies and the Bahamas, particularly to the Abaco Islands.
After the American Revolutionary War, the Crown resettled thousands of American Loyalists to the Bahamas; they took their slaves with them and established plantations on land grants.

Battle of Camden

Camdendefeated at Camdenrouting of a second Continental Army at Camden
Loyalists from South Carolina fought for the British in the Battle of Camden.
The strategy relied on the Loyalists joining forces with British regulars to roll northward through North Carolina and Virginia, besieging the rebels in the north on all sides.

Benjamin Thompson

Count RumfordBenjamin Thompson, Count RumfordRumford
Benjamin Thompson (Count Rumford) was a Loyalist who fled to London when the war began.
He served as lieutenant-colonel of the King's American Dragoons, part of the British Loyalist forces, during the American Revolutionary War.

John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore

Lord DunmoreGovernor DunmoreJohn Murray
As a result of the looming crisis in 1775 the Royal Governor of Virginia, Lord Dunmore, issued a proclamation that promised freedom to servants and slaves who were able to bear arms and join his Loyalist Ethiopian Regiment.
Some even accused Dunmore of colluding with the Shawnees and arranging the war to deplete the Virginia militia and help safeguard the Loyalist cause, should there be a colonial rebellion.

Battle of Lenud's Ferry

Lenud's FerryLanneau's Ferry
The British forces at the Battle of Monck's Corner and the Battle of Lenud's Ferry consisted entirely of Loyalists with the exception of the commanding officer (Banastre Tarleton).
The unit was known as the Loyalist British Legion, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton.

Samuel Seabury

Bishop Samuel SeaburyBishop SeaburySamuel Seabury (1729–1796)
Some became nationally prominent leaders, including Samuel Seabury, who was the first Bishop of the Episcopal Church, and Tench Coxe.
He was a leading Loyalist in New York City during the American Revolution and a known rival of Alexander Hamilton.

Samuel Adams (Loyalist)

Dr. Samuel Adamshis fatherSamuel Adams
Dr. Samuel Adams (1730 – January, 1810) was a physician, surgeon, farmer, land owner, and loyalist soldier, from Arlington, Vermont.

Banastre Tarleton

Tarleton helmetTarletonSir Banastre Tarleton
The British forces at the Battle of Monck's Corner and the Battle of Lenud's Ferry consisted entirely of Loyalists with the exception of the commanding officer (Banastre Tarleton).
After becoming commander of the British Legion, a force of American Loyalist cavalry and light infantry, also called Tarleton's Raiders, Tarleton went to South Carolina, at the beginning of 1780.

History of North Carolina

North CarolinaState of North Carolinahistory
Many people—including former Regulators in North Carolina — refused to join the rebellion, as they had earlier protested against corruption by local authorities who later became Revolutionary leaders.
In 1775, the Patriots easily expelled the Royal governor and suppressed the Loyalists.

James De Lancey

James DeLanceyChief Justice De LanceyDelancey
His brother, Oliver De Lancey, became a senior Loyalist officer in the American War of Independence, joining General Howe on Staten Island in 1776, and raising and equipping De Lancey's Brigade, three battalions of 1,500 Loyalist volunteers from New York State.

Province of Quebec (1763–1791)

Province of QuebecQuebecBritish Province of Quebec
Rebel agents were active in Quebec (which was then frequently called "Canada", the name of the earlier French province) in the months leading to the outbreak of active hostilities.
Owing to an influx of Loyalist refugees from the American Revolutionary War, the demographics of Quebec came to shift and now included a substantial English-speaking Protestant element from the former Thirteen Colonies.

Battle of Monck's Corner

Monck's CornerBattle of Moncks CornerMoncks Corner
The British forces at the Battle of Monck's Corner and the Battle of Lenud's Ferry consisted entirely of Loyalists with the exception of the commanding officer (Banastre Tarleton).
Aside from the British Legion, and the 33rd Foot and 64th Foot led by Lt. Col. James Webster, the force included Loyalists, the American Volunteers, led by Maj. Patrick Ferguson.

James Fenimore Cooper

Fenimore CooperJames Fennimore CooperCooper
She was from a wealthy family who remained loyal to Great Britain during the Revolution.

John Bacon (Loyalist)

John BaconBacon's RefugeesCaptain John Bacon
John Bacon (died April 3, 1783) (also "Bloody John Bacon"), was a leader of the Pine Robbers, a band of Loyalist guerrilla fighters who hid out in the Pine Barrens of south-central New Jersey and preyed upon Patriots toward the end of the American Revolutionary War.

Abaco Islands

AbacoGreat Abaco IslandGreat Abaco
Many Southern Loyalists, taking along their slaves, went to the West Indies and the Bahamas, particularly to the Abaco Islands.
The first European settlers of the islands were Loyalists fleeing the American Revolution who arrived in 1783, as was also the case at Cat Island.

Loyal American Regiment

Loyalist
The Loyal American Regiment was a British Provincial regiment raised in 1777 for Loyalist service during the American Revolutionary War.

William Allen (loyalist)

William AllenAllen, WilliamChief Justice Allen
A Loyalist, Allen agreed that the colonies should seek to redress their grievances with British Parliament through constitutional means, and he disapproved of the movement toward independence.