Lucius Cornelius Sisenna

SisennaCornelius SisennaL. Cornelius Sisenna
Lucius Cornelius Sisenna (c. 120 – 67 BC) was a Roman soldier, historian, and annalist.wikipedia
38 Related Articles

Annalists

annalistannalesannalistic sources
120 – 67 BC) was a Roman soldier, historian, and annalist.

Cornelia (gens)

CorneliaCorneliigens Cornelia
It is not thought that his family, the Cornelii Sisennae, were related to the patrician branches of the famous gens Cornelia, with some scholars suggesting that the Sisennae hailed from Etruria instead.

Nonius Marcellus

NoniusNoni Marcelli
Nothing survives of this work save a few fragments, mostly preserved by the late antique grammarian Nonius Marcellus.
The De compendiosa doctrina is one of the major sources for lost works of the Roman Republic, including the tragedies of Accius and Pacuvius, the satires of Lucilius, and the history of Sisenna.

Sallust

Gaius Sallustius CrispusSallustiusGaius Sallustius Crispus (Sallust)
Sallust, whose fragmentary Histories start in the year 78 BCE, seems to have begun his work as a continuation of Sisenna.
Sallust's account of the Catiline conspiracy (De coniuratione Catilinae or Bellum Catilinae) and of the Jugurthine War (Bellum Jugurthinum) have come down to us complete, together with fragments of his larger and most important work (Historiae), a history of Rome from 78 to 67 BC, intended as a continuation of Cornelius Sisenna's work.

Milesian tale

Aristides of MiletusMilesian TalesMilesiaca'' of Aristides
Sisenna may also be the writer, mentioned by Ovid, who translated a collection of erotic and picaresque tales by Aristides of Miletus entitled Milesiae fabulae, which was said to have served as a model for Petronius' Satyricon.
Later, in the first century BCE, the serious-minded historian Lucius Cornelius Sisenna translated Aristides into Latin under the title Milesiae fabulae (Milesian Fables) for an intellectual relaxation.

Patrician (ancient Rome)

patricianpatrikiospatricians
It is not thought that his family, the Cornelii Sisennae, were related to the patrician branches of the famous gens Cornelia, with some scholars suggesting that the Sisennae hailed from Etruria instead.

Etruria

TyrrheniaEtruscanKingdom of Etruria
It is not thought that his family, the Cornelii Sisennae, were related to the patrician branches of the famous gens Cornelia, with some scholars suggesting that the Sisennae hailed from Etruria instead.

Sulla

Lucius Cornelius SullaLucius Cornelius Sulla FelixCornelius Sulla
It is likely that Sisenna actively supported Sulla during the civil wars of the 80s BCE. It covered in detail the Social War and Sulla's civil wars of the 80s BCE.

Lucullus

Lucius Licinius LucullusLucius LucullusL. Licinius Lucullus
He was friends with some of Sulla's most important associates, including Lucullus, and was apparently overly partial towards Sulla in his writings.

Verres

Gaius Verresanother Roman governor
Later, he contributed to the failed defence of Verres, prosecuted by Cicero in 70 BCE.

Pompey

Pompey the GreatGnaeus Pompeius MagnusPompeius
He was also chosen as a legate for Pompey's campaign against the pirates, and was killed in action on Crete in 67 BCE.

Crete

CretanCretansCreta
He was also chosen as a legate for Pompey's campaign against the pirates, and was killed in action on Crete in 67 BCE.

Social War (91–88 BC)

Social WarMarsic WarSocial Wars
It covered in detail the Social War and Sulla's civil wars of the 80s BCE.

Ernst Badian

E. BadianBadianBadian, E
Sisenna's work was widely read in antiquity, and became a crucial source for the 80s BCE: in Ernst Badian's words, it was "the standard history of the period".

Cicero

Marcus Tullius CiceroCiceronianTully
Cicero, Sallust, Tacitus, and Velleius Paterculus all cite Sisenna at some point, and other historians are assumed to have used him extensively as well, such as Livy, Appian, and Cassius Dio.

Tacitus

Publius Cornelius TacitusCornelius TacitusGaius Cornelius Tacitus
Cicero, Sallust, Tacitus, and Velleius Paterculus all cite Sisenna at some point, and other historians are assumed to have used him extensively as well, such as Livy, Appian, and Cassius Dio.

Marcus Velleius Paterculus

Velleius PaterculusVelleiusPaterculus
Cicero, Sallust, Tacitus, and Velleius Paterculus all cite Sisenna at some point, and other historians are assumed to have used him extensively as well, such as Livy, Appian, and Cassius Dio.

Livy

Titus LiviusLiviusTitus Livy
Cicero, Sallust, Tacitus, and Velleius Paterculus all cite Sisenna at some point, and other historians are assumed to have used him extensively as well, such as Livy, Appian, and Cassius Dio.

Appian

Appian of AlexandriaAppianusAppianus Alexandrinus (Appian)
Cicero, Sallust, Tacitus, and Velleius Paterculus all cite Sisenna at some point, and other historians are assumed to have used him extensively as well, such as Livy, Appian, and Cassius Dio.

Cassius Dio

Dio CassiusDioDion Cassius
Cicero, Sallust, Tacitus, and Velleius Paterculus all cite Sisenna at some point, and other historians are assumed to have used him extensively as well, such as Livy, Appian, and Cassius Dio.

Ovid

Publius Ovidius NasoOvidianOvidius
Sisenna may also be the writer, mentioned by Ovid, who translated a collection of erotic and picaresque tales by Aristides of Miletus entitled Milesiae fabulae, which was said to have served as a model for Petronius' Satyricon.

Eroticism

eroticerotic loveerotically
Sisenna may also be the writer, mentioned by Ovid, who translated a collection of erotic and picaresque tales by Aristides of Miletus entitled Milesiae fabulae, which was said to have served as a model for Petronius' Satyricon.

Picaresque novel

picaresquepicaroPicara
Sisenna may also be the writer, mentioned by Ovid, who translated a collection of erotic and picaresque tales by Aristides of Miletus entitled Milesiae fabulae, which was said to have served as a model for Petronius' Satyricon.

Petronius

Petronius ArbiterGaius Petronius ArbiterGaius Petronius
Sisenna may also be the writer, mentioned by Ovid, who translated a collection of erotic and picaresque tales by Aristides of Miletus entitled Milesiae fabulae, which was said to have served as a model for Petronius' Satyricon.

Sexuality in ancient Rome

stuprumincestuminfames
The robustly sexual Milesiaca of Aristides was translated by Sisenna, one of the praetors of 78 BC.