Ludus (ancient Rome)

ludusliterary gameludiLudus'' (ancient Rome)playpublic primary schoolRoman Ludus
In ancient Roman culture, the Latin word ludus (plural ludi) has several meanings within the semantic field of "play, game, sport, training" (see also ludic).wikipedia
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Primary school

elementary schoolprimaryelementary
An elementary or primary school or the school of the “litterator" attended by boys and girls up to the age of 11 was a ludus. Ludi were to be found throughout the city, and were run by a ludi magister (schoolmaster) who was often an educated slave or freedman. School started around six o'clock each morning and finished just after midday. Students were taught math, reading, writing, poetry, geometry and sometimes rhetoric.
In Rome the primary school was called the ludus; the curriculum developed over the centuries featuring the learning of both Latin and Greek.

Ludi magister

ludimagister
An elementary or primary school or the school of the “litterator" attended by boys and girls up to the age of 11 was a ludus. Ludi were to be found throughout the city, and were run by a ludi magister (schoolmaster) who was often an educated slave or freedman. School started around six o'clock each morning and finished just after midday. Students were taught math, reading, writing, poetry, geometry and sometimes rhetoric.
A Ludi Magister was a teacher at a Roman school, Roman Ludus.

Gladiator

gladiatorsgladiatorialgladiatorial combat
The word ludus also referred to a training school for gladiators; see Gladiator: Schools and training.
Campania hosted the earliest known gladiator schools (ludi).

Ludi

gamescircensesludi circenses
Ludi, always plural, were the games held in conjunction with Roman religious festivals.
The singular form ludus, "game, sport" or "play" has several meanings in Latin.

Culture of ancient Rome

Roman cultureancient Roman cultureRoman
In ancient Roman culture, the Latin word ludus (plural ludi) has several meanings within the semantic field of "play, game, sport, training" (see also ludic).

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
In ancient Roman culture, the Latin word ludus (plural ludi) has several meanings within the semantic field of "play, game, sport, training" (see also ludic).

Semantic field

lexical fieldoverlapoverlaps in usage
In ancient Roman culture, the Latin word ludus (plural ludi) has several meanings within the semantic field of "play, game, sport, training" (see also ludic).

Ludic

In ancient Roman culture, the Latin word ludus (plural ludi) has several meanings within the semantic field of "play, game, sport, training" (see also ludic).

Schoolmaster

masterschoolmistressassistant master
An elementary or primary school or the school of the “litterator" attended by boys and girls up to the age of 11 was a ludus. Ludi were to be found throughout the city, and were run by a ludi magister (schoolmaster) who was often an educated slave or freedman. School started around six o'clock each morning and finished just after midday. Students were taught math, reading, writing, poetry, geometry and sometimes rhetoric.

Slavery in ancient Rome

slavesslaveslavery
An elementary or primary school or the school of the “litterator" attended by boys and girls up to the age of 11 was a ludus. Ludi were to be found throughout the city, and were run by a ludi magister (schoolmaster) who was often an educated slave or freedman. School started around six o'clock each morning and finished just after midday. Students were taught math, reading, writing, poetry, geometry and sometimes rhetoric.

Freedman

freedmenfreed slavesfreedwoman
An elementary or primary school or the school of the “litterator" attended by boys and girls up to the age of 11 was a ludus. Ludi were to be found throughout the city, and were run by a ludi magister (schoolmaster) who was often an educated slave or freedman. School started around six o'clock each morning and finished just after midday. Students were taught math, reading, writing, poetry, geometry and sometimes rhetoric.

Ludus Magnus

Ludus Magnus school
Examples include the Ludus Magnus and Ludus Dacicus.

Ludus Dacicus

Dacian
Examples include the Ludus Magnus and Ludus Dacicus.

Ludus latrunculorum

LatrunculiLuduspessoi
Ludus was also the word for a board game, examples of which include ludus latrunculorum and ludus duodecim scriptorum, or a game played with knucklebones (astragali).

Ludus duodecim scriptorum

XII scripta
Ludus was also the word for a board game, examples of which include ludus latrunculorum and ludus duodecim scriptorum, or a game played with knucklebones (astragali).

Knucklebones

jacksjackstonestali
Ludus was also the word for a board game, examples of which include ludus latrunculorum and ludus duodecim scriptorum, or a game played with knucklebones (astragali).

Alexandrian school

AlexandrianAlexandrian scholarsGreat Catechetical School of Theology of Alexandria
"Poetic play (ludus, ludere, iocum, etc.)," Michèle Lowrie observes, "denotes two related things: stylistic elegance of the Alexandrian variety and erotic poetry."

Roman festivals

festivalfestivalsRoman festival
Ludi, always plural, were the games held in conjunction with Roman religious festivals.

Lusus Troiae

Troy Gameludus TrojaeTrojan games
* Lusus Troiae, the Troy Game

Athenaeum (ancient Rome)

Athenaeumancient school
The Athenaeum was a school (ludus) founded by the Emperor Hadrian in Rome, for the promotion of literary and scientific studies (ingenuarum artium) and called Athenaeum from the town of Athens, which was still regarded as the seat of intellectual refinement.

Women in ancient Rome

Roman womenWomen in Romewomen
Some, perhaps many, girls went to a public primary school, however there is some evidence to suggest that girls’ education was limited to this elementary school level.

Spartacus (TV series)

SpartacusSpartacus seriesSpartacus (2010 TV series)
The prisoner's true name unknown, Lentulus Batiatus, the owner of a ludus in Capua, suggests to name him "Spartacus", because he fought like the ferocious Thracian king of that name.

Man, Play and Games

Les Jeux et Les Hommes
Caillois also places forms of play on a continuum from ludus, structured activities with explicit rules (games), to paidia, unstructured and spontaneous activities (playfulness), although in human affairs the tendency is always to turn paidia into ludus, and that established rules are also subject to the pressures of paidia.

Greek love

Pederasty in ancient RomeGreeklovers
"Greek love", or the cultural model of Greek pederasty in ancient Rome, is a "topos or literary game" that "never stops being Greek in the Roman imagination", an erotic pose to be distinguished from the varieties of real-world sexuality among individuals.