Lugdunum

LugudunumLyonColonia Copia Claudia Augusta LugdunumLugdunum (Lyon)Lyons
Colonia Copia Claudia Augusta Lugdunum (modern Lyon, France) was an important Roman city in Gaul.wikipedia
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Lyon

Lyon, FranceLyonsLyons, France
Colonia Copia Claudia Augusta Lugdunum (modern Lyon, France) was an important Roman city in Gaul.
The city became increasingly referred to as Lugdunum (and occasionally Lugudunum ).

Claudius

Emperor ClaudiusClaudianClaudius Caesar
Two emperors, Claudius and Caracalla, were born in Lugdunum.
Born to Drusus and Antonia Minor at Lugdunum in Roman Gaul, where his father was stationed as a military legate, he was the first Roman emperor to be born outside Italy.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
Colonia Copia Claudia Augusta Lugdunum (modern Lyon, France) was an important Roman city in Gaul.
Many cities were founded during the Gallo-Roman period, including Lugdunum (present-day Lyon), which is considered the capital of the Gauls.

Gallia Lugdunensis

LugdunensisLugdunensis QuartaSecunda Provincia Lugdunensis
It served as the capital of the Roman province of Gallia Lugdunensis and was an important city in the western half of the Roman Empire for centuries.
It is named after its capital Lugdunum (today's Lyon), possibly Roman Europe's major city west of Italy, and a major imperial mint.

Lugus

LughusLugos
The Celtic god Lugus was apparently popular in Ireland and Britain as is found in medieval Irish literature as Lug(h) and in medieval Welsh literature as Lleu (also spelled Llew).
His name was commemorated in numerous place-names, such as Lugdunum (Celtic *Lug[u]dūnon, "fort of Lugus"; modern Lyon, France), capital of the Roman province of Gallia Lugdunensis.

Caracalla

Marcus Aurelius AntoninusAntoninus CaracallaEmperor Caracalla
Two emperors, Claudius and Caracalla, were born in Lugdunum.
Caracalla was born in Lugdunum, Gaul (now Lyon, France), on 4April 188 to Septimius Severus and Julia Domna.

Lucius Munatius Plancus

Munatius PlancusPlancusL. Munatius Plancus
The city was founded in 43 BC by Lucius Munatius Plancus. According to the historian Cassius Dio, in 43 BC, the Roman Senate ordered Munatius Plancus and Lepidus, governors of central and Transalpine Gaul respectively, to found a city for a group of Roman refugees who had been expelled from Vienne (a town about 30 km to the south) by the Allobroges and were encamped at the confluence of the Saône and Rhône rivers.
His funerary inscription attests that he founded the cities of Augusta Raurica (44 BC) and Lugdunum (Lyon) (43 BC) and in June 43 BC, some letters attest to his passage through the village of Cularo (present Grenoble) in the Dauphiné Alps.

Via Agrippa

Agrippan Wayeffective road system
By the end of the reign of Augustus, Strabo described Lugdunum as the junction of four major roads (the Via Agrippa): south to Narbonensis, Massilia and Italy, north to the Rhine river and Germany, northwest to the sea (the English Channel), and west to Aquitania.

Sanctuary of the Three Gauls

federal sanctuary of the three GaulsImperial cult centreImperial cult complex
Caius Julius Vercondaridubnus, a member of the Aedui tribe, was installed as the first priest of the new imperial cult sanctuary, which was subsequently known as the Junction Sanctuary or the Sanctuary of the Three Gauls.
The Sanctuary of the Three Gauls (Tres Galliae) was the focal structure within an administrative and religious complex established by Rome in the very late 1st century BC at Lugdunum (the site of modern Lyon in France).

Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls

amphitheatreamphitheaterAmphithéâtre
By 19 AD at least one temple, and the first amphitheater in Gaul (now known as the Amphithéâtre des Trois-Gaules) had been built on the slopes of the Croix-Rousse hill.
The Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls (Amphithéâtre des Trois Gaules) of Lugdunum (Lyon) was part of the federal sanctuary of the three Gauls dedicated to the cult of Rome and Augustus celebrated by the 60 Gallic tribes when they gathered at Lugdunum.

Gaius Julius Vercondaridubnus

Caius Julius Vercondaridubnus
Caius Julius Vercondaridubnus, a member of the Aedui tribe, was installed as the first priest of the new imperial cult sanctuary, which was subsequently known as the Junction Sanctuary or the Sanctuary of the Three Gauls.
He was the first high priest (sacerdos) of the Altar of the Deified Caesar at Lugdunum (modern Lyon, France), which was inaugurated August 1 in either 12 or 10 BCE at the confluence of the Saône and Rhone rivers.

Gallo-Roman Museum of Lyon-Fourvière

Gallo-Roman Museum of LyonGallo-Roman Museummuseum
Today, the pieces of the huge plaque are the pride of the Gallo-Roman Museum in Lyon.
The Gallo-Roman Museum of Lyon-Fourvière (French: Musée gallo-romain de Lyon-Fourvière) is a museum on the Gallo-Roman civilisation in Lyon (Roman Lugdunum), previously located in the heart of the Roman city and now sited near the city's Roman theatre on the Fourvière hill, half-buried into the hillside on the edge of the archaeological site.

Battle of Lugdunum

Battle of Lyon
Despite a lack of imperial visits for most of the next century, Lugdunum prospered, until Septimius Severus and the Battle of Lugdunum (see below) brought devastation in 197 AD.
The Battle of Lugdunum, also called the Battle of Lyon, was fought on 19 February 197 at Lugdunum (modern Lyon, France), between the armies of the Roman emperor Septimius Severus and of the Roman usurper Clodius Albinus.

Gaul

GallicGalliaGallia Comata
Colonia Copia Claudia Augusta Lugdunum (modern Lyon, France) was an important Roman city in Gaul.

Vienne, Isère

VienneViennoisVienna
According to the historian Cassius Dio, in 43 BC, the Roman Senate ordered Munatius Plancus and Lepidus, governors of central and Transalpine Gaul respectively, to found a city for a group of Roman refugees who had been expelled from Vienne (a town about 30 km to the south) by the Allobroges and were encamped at the confluence of the Saône and Rhône rivers.
The oppidum of the Allobroges became a Roman colony about 47 BC under Julius Caesar, but the Allobroges managed to expel them; the exiles then founded the colony of Lugdunum (today's Lyon).

Imperial cult of ancient Rome

Imperial cultdeifiedRoman imperial cult
Caius Julius Vercondaridubnus, a member of the Aedui tribe, was installed as the first priest of the new imperial cult sanctuary, which was subsequently known as the Junction Sanctuary or the Sanctuary of the Three Gauls.
Soon after, in either 12 BC or 10 BC, the first provincial imperial cult centre in the West was founded at Lugdunum by Drusus, as a focus for his new tripartite administrative division of Gallia Comata.

Endlicher's Glossary

An early interpretation of Gaulish Lugduno as meaning "Desired Mountain" is recorded in a gloss in the 9th-century Endlicher's Glossary, but this may in fact reflect a native Frankish speaker's folk-etymological attempt at linking the first element of the name, Lugu- (which, by the time this gloss was composed, would have been pronounced lu'u, the -g- having become silent) with the similar-sounding Germanic word for "love", *luβ.
* Lugdunum

Nero Claudius Drusus

DrususDrusus the ElderDrusus Germanicus
Agrippa, Drusus, Tiberius, and Germanicus (born himself in Lugdunum) were among the gubernatorial generals who served in Lugdunum.
In summer of 10 BCE, Drusus left the field in order to return to Lugdunum, where he inaugurated the sanctuary of the Three Gaulish provinces at Condate on 1 August.

Septimius Severus

Septimus SeverusSeverusLucius Septimius Severus
Despite a lack of imperial visits for most of the next century, Lugdunum prospered, until Septimius Severus and the Battle of Lugdunum (see below) brought devastation in 197 AD. Two of the rivals, Clodius Albinus and Septimius Severus, initially formed a political alliance.
Bassianus accepted Severus' marriage proposal in early 187, and in the summer the couple married in Lugdunum (modern-day Lyon, France), of which Severus was the governor.

History of Lyon

Christianization of Roman (Southern) FrancehistoryLyon
The area has been inhabited since prehistoric times and was one of the most important cities of the Roman Empire, Lugdunum.

Abascantus

Abascantus (Greek: Ἀβάσκαντος) was a physician of Lugdunum, who probably lived in the 2nd century AD.

Constantine the Great

Constantine IConstantineEmperor Constantine
A major reorganization of imperial administration begun at the end of the 3rd century during the reign of Diocletian and completed a few decades later by Constantine further reduced the importance of Lugdunum.
He disembarked at Lugdunum (Lyon).

Cybele

Magna MaterKybeleGreat Mother
A major shrine of the Phrygian goddess Cybele was built in nearby Vienne, and she also seems to have found special favor in Lugdunum in the late 1st century and 2nd century.
Taurobolium dedications to Magna Mater tend to be more common in the Empire's western provinces than elsewhere, attested by inscriptions in (among others) Rome and Ostia in Italy, Lugdunum in Gaul, and Carthage, in Africa.

Legio I Minervia

I ''MinerviaI Minerviafirst legion
Legio I Minervia remained camped in Lugdunum from 198 to 211.

Clodius Albinus

Decimus Clodius AlbinusAlbinusClodius Albinus' Failed Usurpation
Two of the rivals, Clodius Albinus and Septimius Severus, initially formed a political alliance.
He defeated Severus' legate Virius Lupus, and was able to lay claim to the military resources of Gaul, but although he made Lugdunum the headquarters of his forces, he was unable to win the allegiance of the Rhine legions.