Luiseño

Luiseño peopleLuisenoPayomkowishumLuiseño IndiansPayómkawichumLuiseñosLuiseño languagePayomkawichumpeopleSaboba
The Luiseño or Payómkawichum are an indigenous people of California who, at the time of the first contacts with the Spanish in the 16th century, inhabited the coastal area of southern California, ranging 50 mi from the present-day southern part of Los Angeles County to the northern part of San Diego County, and inland 30 mi.wikipedia
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San Diego County, California

San Diego CountySan DiegoSan Diego metropolitan area
The Luiseño or Payómkawichum are an indigenous people of California who, at the time of the first contacts with the Spanish in the 16th century, inhabited the coastal area of southern California, ranging 50 mi from the present-day southern part of Los Angeles County to the northern part of San Diego County, and inland 30 mi. Known as the "King of the Missions," it was founded on June 13, 1798 by Father Fermín Francisco de Lasuén, located in what is now Oceanside, California, in northern San Diego County.
The area which is now San Diego County has been inhabited for more than 12,000 years by Kumeyaay (also called Diegueno and Ipai/Tipai), Luiseño, Cupeño and Cahuilla Indians and their local predecessors.

Luiseño language

LuiseñoJuaneñoISO 639:lui
In the Luiseño language, the people call themselves Payómkawichum (also spelled Payómkowishum), meaning "People of the West."
The Luiseño language is a Uto-Aztecan language of California spoken by the Luiseño, a Native American people who at the time of the first contacts with the Spanish in the 16th century inhabited the coastal area of southern California, ranging 50 mi from the southern part of Los Angeles County, California, to the northern part of San Diego County, California, and inland 30 mi.

Indigenous peoples of California

indigenous people of CaliforniaCalifornia IndiansNative Californian
The Luiseño or Payómkawichum are an indigenous people of California who, at the time of the first contacts with the Spanish in the 16th century, inhabited the coastal area of southern California, ranging 50 mi from the present-day southern part of Los Angeles County to the northern part of San Diego County, and inland 30 mi.
In Southern California the Toloache religion was dominant among tribes such as the Luiseño and Diegueño.

Pablo Tac

Pablo Tac, born in 1820, recorded, "perhaps from oral history and official records" that approximately five thousand people were living in Payómkawichum territory prior to the arrival of the Spanish.
Pablo Tac (1822–1841) was a Luiseño (Quechnajuichom also spelled "Qéchngawichum") Indian and indigenous scholar who provided a rare contemporary Native American perspective on the institutions and early history of Alta California.

Mission San Luis Rey de Francia

Mission San Luis ReySan Luis ReySan Luis Rey Mission
Spanish missionaries established Mission San Luis Rey de Francia entirely within the borders of Payómkawichum territory in 1798.
This Mission lent its name to the Luiseño tribe of Mission Indians.

Oceanside, California

OceansideOceanside, CACésar Chávez Middle School (Oceanside, California)
Known as the "King of the Missions," it was founded on June 13, 1798 by Father Fermín Francisco de Lasuén, located in what is now Oceanside, California, in northern San Diego County.
Spanish missionaries under Father Junipero Serra founded Mission San Luis Rey de Francia on a former site of a Luiseño Indian village on the banks of the San Luis Rey River.

Palomar Mountain

Palomar Mountain RangePalomar Mountain State ParkPalomar Mountains
The Luiseno Indian name for Palomar Mountain was "Paauw" and High Point was called "Wikyo."

La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indians

La Jolla Indian ReservationLa Jolla Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the La Jolla Reservation, CaliforniaLa Jolla Reservation
The La Jolla Band of Luiseño Indians are a federally recognized tribe of Luiseño Indians, located in northern San Diego County, California.

Pauma Band of Luiseno Mission Indians

Pauma and Yuima ReservationPauma Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the Pauma & Yuima Reservation, CaliforniaPauma Indian Reservation
The Pauma Band of Luiseño Mission Indians of the Pauma and Yuima Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Luiseño Indians in San Diego County, California.

James Luna

LunaLuna, James
James Luna (February 9, 1950 – March 4, 2018 ) was a Payómkawichum, Ipi, and Mexican-American performance artist, photographer and multimedia installation artist.

Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians

Soboba CasinoSoboba Indian ReservationSoboba Reservation
The Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians is a federally recognized tribe of Cahuilla and Luiseño people, headquartered in Riverside County, California.

Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians

Pechanga Indian ReservationPechangaPechanga Band of Luiseño Mission Indians
The Pechanga Band of Luiseño Mission Indians is a federally recognized tribe of Luiseño Indians based in Riverside County, California, where their reservation is located.

Pala Indian Reservation

Pala Band of Mission IndiansPalaPala Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the Pala Reservation, California
Its members, the federally recognized tribe of the Pala Band of Mission Indians, are descended from both Cupeño and Luiseño peoples, who have shared territory since 1901.

Fritz Scholder

Rincon Band of Luiseño Indians

Rincon Indian ReservationRincon ReservationRincon Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the Rincon Reservation, California
The Rincon Band of Luiseño Indians are a federally recognized tribe of Luiseño who live on the Rincon Indian Reservation in the Valley Center CDP, San Diego County, California.

Aesculus californica

California buckeyebuckeyeBuckeye (''Aesculus californica'')
The Luiseño used toxins leached from the California buckeye to stupefy fish in order to harvest them in mountain creeks.
Native American tribes, including the Pomo, Yokut, and Luiseño, used the poisonous nuts and seeds to stupefy schools of fish in small streams to make them easier to catch.

Ruth-Ann Thorn

Ruth-Ann Thorn is a Luiseño gallerist and art collector from Vista California USA.

Luiseño traditional narratives

Luiseño religion
Luiseño traditional narratives include myths, legends, tales, and oral histories preserved by the Luiseño people of southwestern California.

Mission Indians

Mission IndianCalifornia Mission IndiansCalifornia Mission
For instance, the Payomkowishum were renamed Luiseños after the Mission San Luis Rey and the Acjachemem were renamed the Juaneños after the Mission San Juan Capistrano.

Pauma massacre

massacre
Luiseño Indians killed eleven Mexicans, Californio lancers who had stolen horses from them.

USS Luiseno

USS ''Luiseno'' (ATF-156)LuisenoARA ''Francisco de Gurruchaga
Named after the Luiseño peoples (the southernmost division of the Shoshone Indians of California, who received their name from Mission San Luis Rey de Francia, the most important Spanish mission in their territory), she was the only U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name.

Temecula massacre

Temecula Massacre Cemetery
A combined force of California militia and Cahuilla Indians attacked and killed an estimated 33 to 40 Luiseño Indians.

Acjachemen

JuaneñoAcjachememAjachmem
Their traditional language was a variety closely related to the Luiseño language of the nearby Payómkawichum (Luiseño) people, but is now believed to be extinct.

Native American fashion

fashion designerIndianindigenous designers
Jamie Okuma (Luiseño-Shoshone-Bannock), another self-taught artist, became the youngest person to earn the Best of Show ribbon at the Santa Fe Indian Market in 2000.