Lumad

ManoboBukidnonBagoboLumadsMamanwaMandayasMandayaManobosDulangan ManoboHigaonon
The Lumad are a group of non-Muslim Austronesian indigenous people in the southern Philippines.wikipedia
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Mindanao

southern PhilippinesRegion Xisland of Mindanao
It is the self-ascription and collective identity of the indigenous peoples of Mindanao.
Native ethnic groups in Mindanao include the Lumads (namely the Subanons of the Zamboanga Peninsula; the Bukidnon, the Ata Manobos, the Mamanwas, the Matigsalugs, the Agusan Manobos, the Talaandigs, the Kamigins, and the Higaonons of Northern Mindanao and the region of Caraga; the T'boli s, the Tirurays, the B'laans, the Sarangani, and the Cotabato Manobos of the region of SOCCSKSARGEN; and the Obo, the Mandayas, the Giangans, the Tagabawa s, the Kalagan s, the Sangirese, and the Mansaka of the Davao region ) and the Moro s (namely the Maguindanaos, the Maranaos, the Tausugs, the Yakans, the Iranuns, and the Sama, mainly concentrated within the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM).

Tasaday

They include groups like the Erumanen ne Menuvu', Matidsalug Manobo, Agusanon Manobo, Dulangan Manobo, Dabaw Manobo, Ata Manobo, B'laan, Kaulo, Banwaon, Bukidnon, Teduray, Lambangian, Higaunon, Dibabawon, Mangguwangan, Mansaka, Mandaya, K'lagan, Subanen, Tasaday, Tboli, Mamanuwa, Tagakaolo, Talaandig, Tagabawa, Ubu', Tinenanen, Kuwemanen, K'lata and Diyangan.
They are considered to belong to the Lumad group, along with the other indigenous groups on the island.

Misamis Oriental

OrientalOriental MisamisMisamis
The Higaonon is located on the provinces of Bukidnon, Agusan del Sur, Misamis Oriental, Camiguin (used to be Kamiguing), Rogongon in Iligan City, and Lanao del Norte.
In the 16th century, Muslims from Malaysia came and then displaced the non-Muslim Lumads northwards as they came to control most of Mindanao, the inhabitants were converted into Islam.

Malaybalay

Malaybalay CityCity of Malaybalay, BukidnonMailag, Malaybalay
The Bukidnons have rich musical and oral traditions which are celebrated annually in Malaybalay city's Kaamulan Festival, with other tribes in Bukidnon (the Manobo tribes, the Higaonon, Matigsalug, Talaandig, Umayamnom, and the Tigwahanon).
In 1850, Kalasungay (an old settlement site in Malaybalay), was burned down by the Spanish during their final battle with the lumads, in which all male adults were killed and the women and children were taken as hostages.

Agusan del Sur

del SurAgusanAgusan del Sur Province
The Higaonon is located on the provinces of Bukidnon, Agusan del Sur, Misamis Oriental, Camiguin (used to be Kamiguing), Rogongon in Iligan City, and Lanao del Norte.
The Agusan Valley was settled by a variety of cultural communities like the Manobos, Mamanwas and Higaonons.

Philippines

đŸ‡”đŸ‡­FilipinoPhilippine
The Lumad are a group of non-Muslim Austronesian indigenous people in the southern Philippines.
There are also indigenous peoples like the Igorot, the Lumad, the Mangyan, the Bajau, and the tribes of Palawan.

Camiguin

Camiguin IslandCamiguin NorteCamiguin Norte Island
The Higaonon is located on the provinces of Bukidnon, Agusan del Sur, Misamis Oriental, Camiguin (used to be Kamiguing), Rogongon in Iligan City, and Lanao del Norte.
The island of Camiguin is believed to first have been inhabited by the Manobo people of Surigao del Norte, as evidenced by the distinctly connected language between the two groups.

Austronesian peoples

AustronesianAustronesiansAustronesian cultures
The Lumad are a group of non-Muslim Austronesian indigenous people in the southern Philippines.
Lumad: Mindanao. e.g. Kamayo, Manobo, Tasaday, T'boli.

Indigenous peoples

indigenousindigenous peopleaboriginal
The Lumad are a group of non-Muslim Austronesian indigenous people in the southern Philippines.
The indigenous peoples of Mindanao are the Lumad peoples and the Moro (Tausug, Maguindanao Maranao and others) who also live in the Sulu archipelago.

Mamanwa language

Mamanwammn
They speak the Mamanwa language (or Minamanwa).
The Mamanwa language is a Central Philippine language spoken by the Mamanwa people.

Tboli people

TboliT'boliT’boli
They include groups like the Erumanen ne Menuvu', Matidsalug Manobo, Agusanon Manobo, Dulangan Manobo, Dabaw Manobo, Ata Manobo, B'laan, Kaulo, Banwaon, Bukidnon, Teduray, Lambangian, Higaunon, Dibabawon, Mangguwangan, Mansaka, Mandaya, K'lagan, Subanen, Tasaday, Tboli, Mamanuwa, Tagakaolo, Talaandig, Tagabawa, Ubu', Tinenanen, Kuwemanen, K'lata and Diyangan. Representatives from 15 tribes agreed in June 1986 to adopt the name; there were no delegates from the three major groups of the T'boli, the Teduray.
In political contexts, however, the term Lumad groups (derived from the Cebuano term for native people) has become popular as a generic term for the various indigenous peoples of Mindanao.

Davao City

DavaoDavao City, PhilippinesDavao City, Davao del Sur
The Tagakaulo tribe originally came from the western shores of the gulf of Davao and south of Mt. Apo.
The region's name is derived from its Bagobo origins.

Iligan

Iligan CityCity of IliganIligan Chartered City, Philippines
The Higaonon is located on the provinces of Bukidnon, Agusan del Sur, Misamis Oriental, Camiguin (used to be Kamiguing), Rogongon in Iligan City, and Lanao del Norte.
It is not only rich in natural resources and industries but it is also the home of a mix of cultures: the Maranaos of Lanao, the Higaonon of Bukidnon, and many settlers and migrants from other parts of the country.

Santiago, Agusan del Norte

Santiago
They come from Leyte, Agusan del Norte, and Surigao provinces in Mindanao; primarily in Kitcharao and Santiago, Agusan del Norte, though they are lesser in number and more scattered and nomadic than the Manobos and Mandaya tribes who also inhabit the region.
In 1936, the same Aciga River wrought extensive damage which made the inhabitants decide to transfer at the foot of the hill, particularly at Sitio Paypay, which was inhabited by two groups of natives-the Manobos and the Mamanwas, then.

South Mindanao languages

South MindanaoBilicSouth Mindanao, or Bilic, languages
South Mindanao languages
The South Mindanao or Bilic languages are a group of related languages spoken by the Bagobo, B'laan, T'boli, and Tiruray peoples of the southern coast of Mindanao Island in the Philippines.

Compostela Valley

Compostela Valley provinceCompostella ValleyList
The Mandaya are also found in Compostela and New Bataan in Compostela Valley (formerly a part of Davao del Norte Province).
The origin of the province’s inhabitants came from the ethnic tribes of the Mansaka, Mandaya, Manobo, Mangguangan, Dibabawon, Aeta, Kamayo, Davaweño and Kalagan.

Moro people

MoroMorosMoro Muslims
This marked the first time that these tribes had agreed to a common name for themselves, distinct from that of the Moros and different from the migrant majority and their descendants. The Moros like the Maranao, Tausug, Sama-Bajau, Yakan, etc. are also excluded, despite being also native to Mindanao and despite some groups being closely related ethnolinguistically to the Lumad.
Lumad

Lakbayan ng Pambansang Minorya

Lakbayan ng Pambansang Minorya para sa Sariling Pagpapasya at Makatarungang KapayapaanManilakbayan
Groups like the Manilakbayan supported the movements through recruitment and the handing out of national situationers to students to spread awareness about the Lumad's dilemma.
The Lakbayan ng Pambansang Minorya is an annual march, rally, and camp-out (kampuhan) by minority peoples of the Philippines, including Lumad, Aeta, Mangyan, Moro, and Igorot, coming from their respective homelands.

Surigao del Sur

del SurSurigao del Sur Province, PhilippinesSurigao del Sur, Philippines
In Surigao del Sur, a barangay was evacuated to shelter sites in Tandag City due to increasing military and NPA activity.
Before the arrival of the Spanish in the 16th century, the aborigines of the province were the Mamanua and Manobo.

Tandag

Tandag CityNaturalisSurigao del Sur Sports Center
In Surigao del Sur, a barangay was evacuated to shelter sites in Tandag City due to increasing military and NPA activity.
Long before Tandag became what it is today—the bustling capital town of Surigao del Sur was inhabited by the Manobos and the Mamanwas who lived along the river banks under the leadership of Suba, their Chieftain. Suba was later converted into Christianity by Father Juan de la Encarnacion, a Spanish missionary. After Legazpi’s final conquest to the Philippines particularly on 1609, the Spanish government sent missionaries to subdue the hostile natives. One of these missionaries was Father Juan de la Vega who was assigned in Tandag. In an effort to establish a symbol of authority, Fr. dela Vega erected a stone fort and built a small settlement about a size of a football field enclosed by a stone wall. Out of this settlement rose the town of Tandag, which later on became a center of faith.

List of people from Davao

DavaoeñoDavaoeñosDavaweño
Davaoeño people
Locals are themselves often referred to as a "tripeople", composed of indigenous peoples, Moros and descendants of twentieth-century settlers from the Visayas and Luzon.

Blaan people

B'laanBlaanB'laans
The Blaan is an indigenous group that is concentrated in Davao del Sur and South Cotabato.

Yakan people

YakanBasilanYakans
The Moros like the Maranao, Tausug, Sama-Bajau, Yakan, etc. are also excluded, despite being also native to Mindanao and despite some groups being closely related ethnolinguistically to the Lumad.

Ethnic groups in the Philippines

ethnic groupsFilipino ethnolinguistic groupFilipino ethnic groups
This is due to their Visayan ethnicity and lack of close affinity with the Lumad.
In the Agusan Marsh and the highlands of Mindanao, there are native ethnic groups collectively known as the Lumad.

Davao del Norte

DavaoDavao (Davao del Norte)Davao del Norte Province
The term most likely describes the origin of these people who are found today in Davao del Norte and Davao del Sur.
Most of them are Lumads and Aetas.