Lumpia

lumpia wrapperloempialumpia gorenglumpiang sariwaLumpia semaranglumpiang labonglumpiang pritolumpiang singkamasLumpyaspring rolls
Lumpia is a spring roll commonly found in Indonesia and the Philippines.wikipedia
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Indonesian cuisine

IndonesianIndonesiaIndonesian dishes
Lumpia is a spring roll commonly found in Indonesia and the Philippines. Chinese influence is evident in Indonesian cuisine, such as bakmi, mie ayam, pangsit, mie goreng, kwetiau goreng, nasi goreng, bakso, and lumpia.
Elements of Chinese cuisine can be seen in Indonesian cuisine: foods such as noodles, meat balls, and spring rolls have been completely assimilated.

Filipino cuisine

FilipinoPhilippinesPhilippine
Lumpia is a spring roll commonly found in Indonesia and the Philippines.
Popular dishes include: lechón (whole roasted pig), longganisa (Philippine sausage), tapa (cured beef), torta (omelette), adobo (chicken or pork braised in garlic, vinegar, oil and soy sauce, or cooked until dry), dinuguan (pork blood stew), kaldereta (meat stewed in tomato sauce), mechado (larded beef in soy and tomato sauce), pochero (beef and bananas in tomato sauce), afritada (chicken or pork and vegetables simmered in tomato sauce), kare-kare (oxtail and vegetables cooked in peanut sauce), pinakbet (kabocha squash, eggplant, beans, okra, and tomato stew flavored with shrimp paste), crispy pata (deep-fried pig's leg), hamonado (pork sweetened in pineapple sauce), sinigang (meat or seafood in sour broth), pancit (noodles), and lumpia (fresh or fried spring rolls).

Popiah

Bó bǐngpopiaTaiwanese spring roll
Lumpia is quite similar to fresh popiah or fried spring rolls popular in Southeast Asia.
In varieties of Hokkien, it is also commonly referred to as /lun˩piã˥˧/, which is the etymological origin of "lumpia" in Indonesia and the Philippines.

Spring roll

spring rollsChicken Rollsvegetarian spring roll
Lumpia is a spring roll commonly found in Indonesia and the Philippines. In the Netherlands and Belgium, it is spelled loempia, which is the old Indonesian spelling for lumpia, and has also become the generic name for "spring roll" in Dutch.
Lumpia is the name for spring rolls in Indonesia and the Philippines, which was derived from Southern Chinese spring rolls.

Chinese Indonesian cuisine

Chinese IndonesianChineseChinese-Indonesian
In Indonesia lumpia is associated with Chinese Indonesian cuisine and commonly found in cities where significant Chinese Indonesian settles.
Popular Chinese Indonesian foods including bakmi, mie ayam, pangsit, bakso, lumpia, kwetiau goreng and mie goreng.

Mie goreng

mee gorengbamimi goreng
Chinese influence is evident in Indonesian cuisine, such as bakmi, mie ayam, pangsit, mie goreng, kwetiau goreng, nasi goreng, bakso, and lumpia.
Chinese influences are evident in Indonesian food, such as bakmi, mie ayam, pangsit, bakso, lumpia, kwetiau goreng, and mie goreng.

Bakso

Bakwan MalangBeef Meatballmeat balls
Chinese influence is evident in Indonesian cuisine, such as bakmi, mie ayam, pangsit, mie goreng, kwetiau goreng, nasi goreng, bakso, and lumpia.
Chinese influences is apparent in Indonesian food, such as bakmi, mie ayam, pangsit, mie goreng, kwetiau goreng, bakso, and lumpia.

Turon (food)

TuronTurrónturón
Filipino lumpia also have a unique and extremely popular dessert subcategory, the turon.
Turon (Spanish: turrón de banana or turrón de plátano), also known as lumpiyang saging (Filipino for "banana lumpia"), is a Philippine snack made of thinly sliced bananas (preferably saba or Cardaba bananas) and a slice of jackfruit, dusted with brown sugar, rolled in a spring roll wrapper and fried.

Rice vermicelli

bihunbee hoonbihon
The filling is simple and modest, only filled with bihun (rice vermicelli) with chopped carrots and cabbages.
Lumpia and risoles, several types of spring rolls gorengan (fritters) use rice vermicelli and vegetables filling

Semarang

Samarangthe city of Semarangcity
Named after the capital city of Central Java in Indonesia, Semarang, where significant Chinese Indonesian settles, lumpia Semarang is perhaps the most popular lumpia variant in Indonesia.
Semarang is widely known for its Bandeng presto (pressure-cooked milkfish), Lumpia, Wingko, Tahu Gimbal, and Ganjel Rel.

Indonesian language

IndonesianIndonesiaBahasa Indonesia
In the Netherlands and Belgium, it is spelled loempia, which is the old Indonesian spelling for lumpia, and has also become the generic name for "spring roll" in Dutch.
Words of Chinese origin (presented here with accompanying Hokkien/ Mandarin pronunciation derivatives as well as traditional and simplified characters) include pisau (匕首 bǐshǒu – knife), loteng, (樓/層 = lóu/céng – [upper] floor/ level), mie (麵 > 面 Hokkien mī – noodles), lumpia (潤餅 (Hokkien = lūn-piáⁿ) – springroll), cawan (茶碗 cháwǎn – teacup), teko (茶壺 > 茶壶 = cháhú [Mandarin], teh-ko [Hokkien] = teapot), 苦力 kuli = 苦 khu (hard) and 力 li (energy) and even the widely used slang terms gua and lu (from the Hokkien 'goa' 我 and 'lu/li' 汝 – meaning 'I/ me' and 'you').

Dinamita

Dinamita or "dynamite lumpia" is a deep-fried stuffed whole chili pepper wrapped in a thin egg crêpe.
It is a type of lumpia and it is commonly eaten as an appetizer or as a companion to beer.

Chinese Indonesians

Chineseethnic ChineseChinese Indonesian
In Indonesia lumpia is associated with Chinese Indonesian cuisine and commonly found in cities where significant Chinese Indonesian settles. Named after the capital city of Central Java in Indonesia, Semarang, where significant Chinese Indonesian settles, lumpia Semarang is perhaps the most popular lumpia variant in Indonesia. The recipes, both fried and fresh versions, were brought by Chinese immigrants from the Fujian province of China to Southeast Asia and became popular when they settled in Indonesia and the Philippines.
Some popular Indonesian dishes such as nasi goreng, lumpia, and bakpia can trace their origin to Chinese influence.

Bamboo shoot

bamboo shootsbambooshoot
Indonesian lumpia is commonly filled with seasoned chopped rebung (bamboo shoots) with minced chicken or prawns, served with fresh baby shallots or leeks in sweet tauco (fermented soy) based sauce.
Other recipes using bamboo shoots are sayur lodeh (mixed vegetables in coconut milk) and lun pia (sometimes written lumpia: fried wrapped bamboo shoots with vegetables).

Soto mie

Mee sotoNoodle Sotonoodles
The sliced lumpia goreng is also the ingredient of soto mie (noodle soto).
It is made of beef or cow's trotters (tendons, skin and cartilage) with noodles, slices of risole (fried spring rolls with bihun and vegetables filling similar to lumpia), tomato, cabbage, potato, and celery.

Lumpiang Shanghai

Lumpiang Shanghai is regarded as the most basic type of lumpia and is one of the most commonly served dishes in Filipino gatherings.
Lumpiang Shanghai is regarded as the most basic type of lumpia in Filipino cuisine, and it is usually smaller and thinner than other lumpia variants.

Lumpiang ubod

lumpiang Silay
Lumpiang singkamas is similar to lumpiang ubod, but it is made primarily with julienned strips of singkamas (jicama) rather than heart of palm.
It is commonly served fresh (as lumpiang sariwa), but i can also be deep-fried.

Lumpiang keso

Lumpiang keso, more commonly known as "cheese lumpia" or "cheese sticks", is deep-fried lumpia with a slice of cheese (usually cheddar) as filling.
The recipe merely involves rolling a large stick of cheese (usually processed cheese or cheddar) in a lumpia wrapper (the thin kind).

Pachyrhizus erosus

jicamajícamaSingkamas
Lumpiang singkamas is similar to lumpiang ubod, but it is made primarily with julienned strips of singkamas (jicama) rather than heart of palm. Lumpiang sariwa (Tagalog: "fresh spring roll") or "fresh lumpia", consists of minced minced vegetables and/or various pre-cooked meat or seafood and jicama (singkamas) as an extender, encased in a double wrapping of lettuce leaf and a yellowish egg crêpe.
Spaniards spread cultivation of jícama from Mexico to the Philippines (where it is known as singkamas, from Nahuatl xicamatl), from there it went to China and other parts of Southeast Asia, where notable uses of raw jícama include popiah, fresh lumpia in the Philippines, and salads in Indonesia, Singapore, and Malaysia such as yusheng and rojak.

Lumpiang gulay

vegetarian
Lumpiang gulay ("vegetable spring roll"), a version of lumpia usually consisting of various chopped vegetables and a small amount of pork or shrimp.
They are then wrapped in lumpia wrapper and deep-fried.

Filipino Chinese cuisine

Chinese Filipino
Filipino Chinese cuisine
With lumpia, the Chinese eggroll which now has been incorporated into Philippine cuisine, even when it was still called lumpiang Shanghai (indicating frying and a pork filling).

List of stuffed dishes

Turkish stuffed dishes
List of stuffed dishes
Lumpia

Egg roll

Philippines

🇵🇭FilipinoPhilippine
Popular dishes include lechón, adobo, sinigang, kare-kare, tapa, crispy pata, pancit, lumpia, and halo-halo.

Hors d'oeuvre

appetizerhors d'œuvrehors d'oeuvres
It is often served as an appetizer or snack, and might be served deep fried or fresh (unfried).