Lycée Louis-le-Grand

Louis-le-GrandCollège Louis-le-GrandCollège de ClermontCollège Louis le GrandClermont CollegeLouis-le-Grand collegeLycee Louis-le-GrandClermontCollege de ClermontCollege of Clermont
The Lycée Louis-le-Grand is a prestigious secondary school located in Paris.wikipedia
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Lycée Henri-IV

Lycée Henri IVCollège Henri-IVLycée Napoléon
Its southern side opens onto the place du Panthéon, which is the location of its historical rival, the Lycée Henri-IV.
Along with Louis-le-Grand it is widely regarded as one of the most prestigious and demanding sixth-form colleges (lycées) in France.

Charles Baudelaire

BaudelaireBaudelairianBaudelaire, Charles
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
Later, he attended the Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris, studying law, a popular course for those not yet decided on any particular career.

Molière

MoliereJean-Baptiste PoquelinJean-Baptiste Molière
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
Born into a prosperous family and having studied at the Collège de Clermont (now Lycée Louis-le-Grand), Molière was well suited to begin a life in the theatre.

Voltaire

VoltairianFrançois-Marie Arouet (Voltaire)Voltairianism
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
He was educated by the Jesuits at the Collège Louis-le-Grand (1704–1711), where he was taught Latin, theology, and rhetoric; later in life he became fluent in Italian, Spanish, and English.

École normale supérieure (Paris)

École Normale SupérieureÉcole NormaleENS
It offers both a sixth-form college curriculum (as a lycée or high school with 800 pupils), and a post-secondary-level curriculum (classes préparatoires with 900 students), preparing students for entrance to the elite Grandes Écoles for research, such as the École Normale Supérieure, for engineering, such as the École Polytechnique, or for business, such as HEC Paris.
An École préparatoire was created on 9 March 1826 at the site of collège Louis-le-Grand.

Camille Desmoulins

DesmoulinsDesmoullinsLucie Simplice Camille Benoît Desmoulins
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
Through the efforts of a friend, he obtained a scholarship for the fourteen-year-old Camille to enter the Collège Louis-le-Grand in Paris.

Marquis de Sade

Sadede SadeSadean
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
Later in his childhood, Sade was sent to the Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris, a Jesuit college, for four years.

Jacques Derrida

DerridaDerrida, JacquesDerrida, J.
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
In the late 1940s, he attended the, in Algiers; in 1949 he moved to Paris, attending the Lycée Louis-le-Grand, where his professor of philosophy was Étienne Borne.

Georges Méliès

MélièsGeorge MélièsMelies
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
Georges Méliès attended the Lycée Michelet from age seven until it was bombed during the Franco-Prussian War; he was then sent to the prestigious Lycée Louis-le-Grand.

Jean Cavaillès

CavaillèsCavaillès, Jean
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
After passing his first baccalauréat in 1919 and baccalauréats in mathematics and philosophy the following year, he studied at the Lycée Louis-le-Grand, including two years of fr:classes préparatoires, before entering the École Normale Supérieure in 1923, reading philosophy.

Edgar Degas

DegasDegas, EdgarDegas (Hilaire-Germain-Edgar De Gas)
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
Degas (he adopted this less grandiose spelling of his family name when he became an adult) began his schooling at age eleven, enrolling in the Lycée Louis-le-Grand.

Nicholas I of Montenegro

Nicholas INikola IKing Nikola
Renowned foreign students of the lycée include King Nicholas I of Montenegro, Léopold Sédar Senghor, and Saint Francis de Sales.
The princess was an ardent francophile, and at her suggestion the young heir-presumptive of the vladikas was sent to the Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris.

Évariste Galois

GaloisGalois, ÉvaristeE. Galois
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
In October 1823, he entered the Lycée Louis-le-Grand, At the age of 14, he began to take a serious interest in mathematics.

Léopold Sédar Senghor

SenghorLeopold SenghorLéopold Senghor
Renowned foreign students of the lycée include King Nicholas I of Montenegro, Léopold Sédar Senghor, and Saint Francis de Sales.
Starting his post-secondary studies at the Sorbonne, he quit and went on to the Lycée Louis-le-Grand to finish his prep course for entrance to the École Normale Supérieure, a grande école.

Laurent Schwartz

Laurent-Moïse SchwartzSchwartzSchwartz, Laurent
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
During his training at Lycée Louis-le-Grand to enter the École Normale Supérieure, he fell in love with Marie-Hélène Lévy, daughter of the probabilist Paul Lévy who was then teaching at the École polytechnique.

Eugène Delacroix

DelacroixDelacroix, EugèneFerdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.
His early education was at the Lycée Louis-le-Grand, and at the Lycée Pierre Corneille in Rouen where he steeped himself in the classics and won awards for drawing.

Frédéric Beigbeder

Frédéric Beigbeder
He studied at the Lycée Montaigne and Louis-le-Grand, and later at the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris and the CELSA Paris-Sorbonne.

Maurice Bardèche

BARDÈCHE, Maurice
Maurice Bardèche
A product of the educational opportunities of the Third Republic, Bardèche had received a scholarship, and completed hypokhâgne at the prestigious Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris.

Laurent-Emmanuel Calvet

Laurent E. Calvet
Laurent-Emmanuel Calvet
He attended Lycée Janson de Sailly and Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris.

Alain Badiou

Badiou, AlainBadiouBadiousian
Alain Badiou
He was a student at the Lycée Louis-Le-Grand and then the École Normale Supérieure (1955–1960).

Marc Bloch

BlochBloch, Marc
Marc Bloch
Bloch was educated at the prestigious Lycée Louis-le-Grand for three years, where he was consistently head of his class and won prizes in French, history, Latin and natural history.

Aimé Césaire

Aime Cesaire
Aimé Césaire
He traveled to Paris to attend the Lycée Louis-le-Grand on an educational scholarship.

Paul Bourget

BourgetBourget, Paul
Paul Bourget
He afterwards studied at the Lycée Louis-le-Grand and at the École des Hautes Études.

Souleymane Bachir Diagne

Souleymane Bachir Diagne
After passing his baccalauréat in Senegal, Diagne was admitted to the demanding public secondary school Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris, following in the footsteps, almost a half-century later, of his compatriot and the first president of Senegal, Léopold Sédar Senghor.

Patrice Chéreau

ChéreauPatrice Chereau
Patrice Chéreau
He became well known to Parisian critics as director, actor, and stage manager of his high-school theatre (lycée Louis-le-Grand).