Lyceum Theatre, London

Lyceum TheatreLyceumLyceum BallroomEnglish Opera HouseThe LyceumLondon LyceumLyceum TheaterStrand LyceumThe English Opera House Lyceum Theatre
The Lyceum Theatre (pronounced ly-CEE-um) is a 2,100-seat West End theatre located in the City of Westminster, on Wellington Street, just off the Strand.wikipedia
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Samuel James Arnold

Samuel Arnold
Managed by Samuel Arnold, from 1794 to 1809 the building hosted a variety of entertainments including a circus produced by Philip Astley, a chapel, and the first London exhibition of waxworks displayed by Madame Tussaud.
Under his management the Lyceum Theatre, London became the English Opera House, and staged the first English productions of many operas, including in 1824 Carl Maria von Weber's Der Freischütz.

Morton Peto

Samuel Morton PetoPetoSir Samuel Morton Peto
It was built by the partnership of Peto & Grissell.
A partner in the firm of Grissell and Peto, he managed construction firms that built many major buildings and monuments in London, including The Reform Club, The Lyceum, Nelson's Column and the new Houses of Parliament; which made him a millionaire.

Henry Irving

Sir Henry IrvingIrving[Henry] Irving
From 1871 to 1902, Henry Irving appeared at the theatre in, especially, Shakespeare, usually starring opposite Ellen Terry.
H. Irving''', was an English stage actor in the Victorian era, known as an actor-manager because he took complete responsibility (supervision of sets, lighting, direction, casting, as well as playing the leading roles) for season after season at the Lyceum Theatre, establishing himself and his company as representative of English classical theatre.

Madame Tussauds

Madame TussaudMadame Tussauds London Madame Tussauds Museum
It was also used as a chapel, a concert room, and for the first London exhibition of waxworks displayed by Madame Tussauds in 1802.
In 1802, she accepted an invitation from Paul Philidor, a lantern and phantasmagoria pioneer, to exhibit her work alongside his show at the Lyceum Theatre, London.

The Lion King (musical)

The Lion KingLion KingThe Lion King Musical
Since 1999, the theatre has hosted The Lion King.
The show opened in the West End's Lyceum Theatre on October 19, 1999, and is still running after more than 7,500 performances.

James Planché

James Robinson PlanchéJ. R. PlanchéPlanché
The theatre then played opera, adaptations of Charles Dickens novels and James Planché's "fairy extravaganzas", among other works.
A further six of his plays were performed in 1819, the same number in 1820, and eleven in 1821, most of these at the Adelphi Theatre, but also including some at the Lyceum, the Olympic and Sadler's Wells.

Bertie Crewe

Capitol CinemaGaumont Cinema
In 1904 the theatre was almost completely rebuilt and richly ornamented in Rococo style by Bertie Crewe, but it retained Beazley's façade and grand portico.

Samuel Beazley

After a fire, the house was rebuilt and reopened on 14 July 1834 to a design by Samuel Beazley.
He had already had a work professionally produced at the Theatre Royal English Opera, Lyceum in 1811: The Boarding House; or, Five Hours at Brighton, a musical farce in two acts.

The Mountain Sylph

Mountain Sylph
Composer John Barnett produced a number of works in the first few years of the theatre, including The Mountain Sylph (1834), credited as the first modern English opera.
It was first produced in London at the Lyceum Theatre in 1834 with great success.

West End theatre

West EndLondonLondon's West End
The Lyceum Theatre (pronounced ly-CEE-um) is a 2,100-seat West End theatre located in the City of Westminster, on Wellington Street, just off the Strand.

Box and Cox (farce)

Box and Cox
Their first big success was John Maddison Morton's Box and Cox.
Box and Cox was first produced at the Lyceum Theatre, London, on 1 November 1847, billed as a "romance of real life."

Ellen Terry

Dame Ellen TerryEllenDame Alice Ellen Terry
From 1871 to 1902, Henry Irving appeared at the theatre in, especially, Shakespeare, usually starring opposite Ellen Terry.
In 1878 the 30-year-old Terry joined Henry Irving's company at the Lyceum Theatre as its leading lady at a generous salary, beginning with Ophelia opposite Irving's Hamlet.

John Barnett

Composer John Barnett produced a number of works in the first few years of the theatre, including The Mountain Sylph (1834), credited as the first modern English opera.
Barnett was born at Bedford, and at the age of eleven sang at the Lyceum Theatre stage in London.

Marie Tussaud

Madame TussaudMadame Tussaud's Wax MuseumMadam Tussaud
Managed by Samuel Arnold, from 1794 to 1809 the building hosted a variety of entertainments including a circus produced by Philip Astley, a chapel, and the first London exhibition of waxworks displayed by Madame Tussaud.
She had accepted an invitation from Paul Philidor, a magic lantern and phantasmagoria pioneer, to exhibit her work alongside his show at the Lyceum Theatre.

Beefsteak Club

BeefsteakSublime Society of Beef Steaksbeefsteak clubs
During this period, the "Sublime Society of Beef Steaks," which had been founded in 1735 by theatre manager Henry Rich, had its home at the theatre for over 50 years until 1867.
The society met at Covent Garden until the fire of 1808, when it moved first to the Bedford Coffee House, and thence the following year to the Old Lyceum Theatre.

Bram Stoker

StokerAbraham "Bram" StokerAbraham 'Bram' Stoker
Bram Stoker worked between 1878 and 1898 as business manager of the theatre, and Irving was Stoker's real-life inspiration for the character Count Dracula in his 1897 novel, Dracula.
During his lifetime, he was better known as the personal assistant of actor Sir Henry Irving, and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.

The Bells (play)

The Bellsstage melodramaThe Bells'' (play)
Irving began with the French melodrama The Bells, an instant hit in which he played the ghost-haunted burgomaster.
The play opened on 25 November 1871 at the Lyceum Theatre in London and initially ran for 151 performances.

Harlequin Cock Robin and Jenny Wren

In 1867, he presented his Christmas pantomime, called Harlequin Cock Robin and Jenny Wren, and in 1884, he produced the drama Comedy and Tragedy.
The piece premiered at the Lyceum Theatre, London on 26 December 1867.

Robert Keeley (comedian)

Robert KeeleyRobertMr. and Mrs. Keeley
From 1844 to 1847 the theatre was managed by husband and wife team Robert Keeley and Mary Anne Keeley, during which period the house became associated with adaptations of Charles Dickens's novels and Christmas books.
In 1823 he appeared at the English Opera House as the original Fritz in Presumption; or, the Fate of Frankenstein by Richard Brinsley Peake; and the Gardener in Frozen Lake by James Planché, both roles having been written for him.

Charles Dibdin

DibdinTom BowlingCharles Didbin
The building was then leased out for dances and other entertainments, including musical entertainments by Charles Dibdin.
This was first given at the Lyceum Theatre in The Strand, and afterwards at Fisher's or Stevens' Auction Room in King Street, in Covent Garden.

Mecca Leisure Group

Locarno BallroomMeccaMecca Ballrooms
The building closed in 1939 and was set to be demolished, but it was saved and converted into a Mecca Ballroom in 1951, styled the Lyceum Ballroom, where many well-known bands played.

Dracula

novelCarfax AbbeyCount Dracula
Bram Stoker worked between 1878 and 1898 as business manager of the theatre, and Irving was Stoker's real-life inspiration for the character Count Dracula in his 1897 novel, Dracula.
Between 1879 and 1898, Stoker was a business manager for the Lyceum Theatre in London, where he supplemented his income by writing many sensational novels, his most successful being the vampire tale Dracula published on 26 May 1897.

Michael William Balfe

Michael BalfeBalfeMichael W. Balfe
In 1841–43, composer Michael William Balfe managed the theatre and produced National Opera here, but the venture was ultimately unsuccessful.
In 1841, Balfe founded the National Opera at the Lyceum Theatre, but the venture was a failure.

Charles Fechter

Charles Albert FechterFechter
Charles Fechter, who managed the theatre from 1863–67 also favored spectacular productions.
In 1863 he became lessee of the Lyceum Theatre, which he opened with The Duke's Motto; this was followed by The King's Butterfly, The Mountebank (in which his son Paul, a boy of seven, appeared), The Roadside Inn, The Master of Ravenswood, The Corsican Brothers (in the original French version, in which he had created the parts of Louis and Fabian dei Franchi) and The Lady of Lyons.

Pantomime

pantomimespantopantomimist
In 1867, he presented his Christmas pantomime, called Harlequin Cock Robin and Jenny Wren, and in 1884, he produced the drama Comedy and Tragedy.
The last harlequinade was played at the Lyceum Theatre in 1939.