Lyon

Lyon, FranceLyonsLyon-ParillyCity of LyonLugdunumLyons, France Lyon, Franceand LyonaiscityFrench city
Lyon (, also spelled in English Lyons and in this case alternatively pronounced ; Lyon ; Liyon ) is the third-largest city and second-largest urban area of France.wikipedia
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France

🇫🇷FrenchFRA
Lyon (, also spelled in English Lyons and in this case alternatively pronounced ; Lyon ; Liyon ) is the third-largest city and second-largest urban area of France.
Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice.

Saint-Étienne

Saint EtienneSaint-EtienneSaint-Étienne, France
It is located in the country's east-central part at the confluence of the rivers Rhône and Saône, about 470 km south from Paris, 320 km north from Marseille and 56 km northeast from Saint-Étienne.
Saint-Étienne (Sant-Etiève; Saint Stephen) is a city in eastern central France, in the Massif Central, 55 km southwest of Lyon in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region, on the trunk road that connects Toulouse with Lyon.

Marseille

MassiliaMassaliaMarseille, France
It is located in the country's east-central part at the confluence of the rivers Rhône and Saône, about 470 km south from Paris, 320 km north from Marseille and 56 km northeast from Saint-Étienne.
Its metropolitan area, which extends over 3173 km2 is the third-largest in France after Paris and Lyon, with a population of 1,831,500 as of 2010.

Lyonnaise cuisine

cuisineLyon, FranceMères lyonnaises
The city is known for its cuisine and gastronomy, and historical and architectural landmarks; part of it is a registered as a UNESCO World Heritage site.
Lyonnaise cuisine refers to cooking traditions and practices centering on the area around the French city of Lyon and the historical culinary traditions Lyonnais.

Saône

Saône River Saône RiverArar
It is located in the country's east-central part at the confluence of the rivers Rhône and Saône, about 470 km south from Paris, 320 km north from Marseille and 56 km northeast from Saint-Étienne. These refugees had been expelled from Vienne and were now encamped at the confluence of the Saône and Rhône rivers.
It is a right tributary of the Rhône, rising at Vioménil in the Vosges department and joining the Rhône in Lyon, just south of the Presqu'île.

Euronews

ESA EuronewsEuro News RossiyaEuronews HD
Lyon hosts the international headquarters of Interpol, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and Euronews.
Euronews is a European pay television news network, headquartered in Lyon, France.

Lugdunum

LyonLugdunum (Lyon)Lyons
The city became increasingly referred to as Lugdunum (and occasionally Lugudunum ). The earliest translation of this Gaulish place-name as "Desired Mountain" is offered by the 9th-century Endlicher Glossary.
Colonia Copia Claudia Augusta Lugdunum (modern Lyon, France) was an important Roman city in Gaul.

Vienne, Isère

VienneViennacom. Vienne
These refugees had been expelled from Vienne and were now encamped at the confluence of the Saône and Rhône rivers.
Vienne (Vièna) is a commune in southeastern France, located 35 km south of Lyon, on the river Rhône.

Fourvière

The foundation was built on Fourvière hill and officially called Colonia Copia Felix Munatia, a name invoking prosperity and the blessing of the gods.
Fourvière is a district of Lyon, France, a hill immediately west of the old part of the town, rising from the river Saône.

Auguste and Louis Lumière

Lumière brothersLumièreLouis Lumière
Lyon played a significant role in the history of cinema: it is where Auguste and Louis Lumière invented the cinematograph.
They moved to Lyon in 1870, where son Edouard and three daughters were born.

Cinematograph

cinématographecinematographekinematograph
Lyon played a significant role in the history of cinema: it is where Auguste and Louis Lumière invented the cinematograph.
It was invented in the 1890s in Lyon by Auguste and Louis Lumière.

Rhône

RhoneRhone valleyRhône Valley
It is located in the country's east-central part at the confluence of the rivers Rhône and Saône, about 470 km south from Paris, 320 km north from Marseille and 56 km northeast from Saint-Étienne. These refugees had been expelled from Vienne and were now encamped at the confluence of the Saône and Rhône rivers.
Before railroads and highways were developed, the Rhône was an important inland trade and transportation route, connecting the cities of Arles, Avignon, Valence, Vienne and Lyon to the Mediterranean ports of Fos-sur-Mer, Marseille and Sète.

Urban area (France)

metropolitan areaaire urbaineList of fifteen largest French metropolitan areas by population
Lyon (, also spelled in English Lyons and in this case alternatively pronounced ; Lyon ; Liyon ) is the third-largest city and second-largest urban area of France.

Claudius

Emperor ClaudiusClaudianClaudius Caesar
Two Emperors were born in this city: Claudius, whose speech is preserved in the Lyon Tablet in which he justifies the nomination of Gallic Senators, and Caracalla.
Claudius was born on 1 August 10 BC at Lugdunum (modern Lyon, France).

Lyon Metropolis

LyonMétropole de LyonGreater Lyon
It is the capital of the Metropolis of Lyon and the region of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes.
Encompassing the city of Lyon and most of its suburbs, it has jurisdiction as both a department and a métropole, taking the territory out of the purview of the department of Rhône.

Irenaeus

Irenaeus of LyonsSt. IrenaeusSaint Irenaeus
In the second century AD, the great Christian bishop of Lyon was the Easterner, Irenaeus.
Chosen as bishop of Lugdunum, now Lyon, his best-known work is On the Detection and Overthrow of the So-Called Gnosis, often cited as Adversus Haereses, an attack on gnosticism, in particular that of Valentinus.

Louise Labé

Labe, LouiseLabé
In the later 1400s and 1500s Lyon was also a key centre of literary activity and book publishing, both of French writers (such as Maurice Scève, Antoine Heroet, and Louise Labé) and of Italians in exile (such as Luigi Alamanni and Gian Giorgio Trissino).
Louise Labé, (c. 1524, Lyon – 25 April 1566, Parcieux), also identified as La Belle Cordière (The Beautiful Ropemaker), was a feminist French poet of the Renaissance born in Lyon, the daughter of wealthy ropemaker Pierre Charly and his second wife, Etiennette Roybet.

Blandina

Saint BlandinaThe Martyrs of LyonsMartyrs of Lyon
Local saints from this period include Blandina, Pothinus, and Epipodius, among others.
Saint Blandina (Blandine, died 177 AD) was a Christian martyr who died at Lyon, France during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

Regions of France

regionrégionadministrative region
It is the capital of the Metropolis of Lyon and the region of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes.

Place Bellecour

Bellecour
Many buildings were destroyed, especially around the Place Bellecour, while Jean-Marie Collot d'Herbois and Joseph Fouché administered the execution of more than 2,000 people.
La Place Bellecour is a large square in the centre of Lyon, France, to the north of the Ainay district.

Saint Pothinus

PothinusPhotinusPothin (Pothinus)
Local saints from this period include Blandina, Pothinus, and Epipodius, among others.
The letter was sent from the Christian communities of Lyon and Vienne to the Roman province of Asia.

Canut revolts

Canut revolt1834 silk workers revoltFirst Canut revolt
In 1831 and 1834, the canuts (silk workers) of Lyon staged two major uprisings for better working conditions and pay.
The Canut revolts (Révolte des canuts) is the collective name for the major revolts by Lyonnais silk workers (canuts) which occurred in 1831, 1834 and 1848.

Canut

canutsLyon-Japan club
In 1831 and 1834, the canuts (silk workers) of Lyon staged two major uprisings for better working conditions and pay.
The canuts were Lyonnais silk workers, often working on Jacquard looms.

Maurice Scève

MauriceScève
In the later 1400s and 1500s Lyon was also a key centre of literary activity and book publishing, both of French writers (such as Maurice Scève, Antoine Heroet, and Louise Labé) and of Italians in exile (such as Luigi Alamanni and Gian Giorgio Trissino).
1564), was a French poet active in Lyon during the Renaissance period.

Gallia Lugdunensis

Lugdunensis QuartaSecunda Provincia LugdunensisGallia Lugdunensis I
The city became the starting point of the principal Roman roads in the area, and it quickly became the capital of the province, Gallia Lugdunensis.
It is named after its capital Lugdunum (today's Lyon), possibly Roman Europe's major city west of Italy, and a major imperial mint.