Lyra

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Lyra (Latin for lyre, from Greek λύρα) is a small constellation.wikipedia
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Vega

Alpha Lyrae2828Botercadent
Vega, Lyra's brightest star, is one of the brightest stars in the night sky, and forms a corner of the famed Summer Triangle asterism.
Vega is the brightest star in the northern constellation of Lyra.

Beta Lyrae

β Lyrβ LyraeSheliak
Beta Lyrae is the prototype of a class of binary star known as Beta Lyrae variables.
Beta Lyrae (β Lyrae, abbreviated Beta Lyr, β Lyr) is a multiple star system in the constellation of Lyra.

Hercules (constellation)

HerculesErcoleHercules constellation
Beginning at the north, Lyra is bordered by Draco, Hercules, Vulpecula, and Cygnus.
Hercules is bordered by Draco to the north; Boötes, Corona Borealis, and Serpens Caput to the east; Ophiuchus to the south; Aquila to the southwest; and Sagitta, Vulpecula, and Lyra to the west.

Ring Nebula

M576720Ring nebula in Lyra
Lyra also hosts the Ring Nebula, the second-discovered and best-known planetary nebula.
The Ring Nebula (also catalogued as Messier 57, M57 or NGC 6720) is a planetary nebula in the northern constellation of Lyra.

Cygnus (constellation)

CygnusCygnus constellationconstellation of Cygnus
Beginning at the north, Lyra is bordered by Draco, Hercules, Vulpecula, and Cygnus.
Zeus disguised himself as a swan to seduce Leda, Spartan king Tyndareus's wife, who gave birth to the Gemini, Helen of Troy, and Clytemnestra; Orpheus was transformed into a swan after his murder, and was said to have been placed in the sky next to his lyre (Lyra); and the King Cygnus was transformed into a swan.

Constellation

constellationsEuropean constellationModern constellation
Lyra (Latin for lyre, from Greek λύρα) is a small constellation.
The southern False Cross asterism includes portions of the constellations Carina and Vela and the Summer Triangle is composed of the brightest stars in the constellations Lyra, Aquila and Cygnus.

Summer Triangle

Chinese constellationsthird star forms a symbolic bridge
Vega, Lyra's brightest star, is one of the brightest stars in the night sky, and forms a corner of the famed Summer Triangle asterism. Vega forms one corner of the famous Summer Triangle asterism; along with Altair and Deneb, these three stars form a prominent triangle during the northern hemisphere summer.
The defining vertices of this imaginary triangle are at Altair, Deneb, and Vega, each of which is the brightest star of its constellation (Aquila, Cygnus, and Lyra, respectively).

Asterism (astronomy)

asterismasterismsFalse Cross
Its main asterism consists of six stars, and 73 stars in total are brighter than magnitude 6.5.

Delta2 Lyrae

δ 2 LyrDelta 2 LyraeDelta² Lyrae
The brighter and closer of the two, Delta 2 Lyrae, is a 4th-magnitude red bright giant that varies semiregularly by around 0.2 magnitudes with a dominant period of 79 days, while the fainter Delta 1 Lyrae is a spectroscopic binary consisting of a B-type primary and an unknown secondary.
Delta 2 Lyrae (δ 2 Lyr) is a 4th magnitude star in the constellation Lyra, approximately 900 light years away from Earth.

Orpheus

Orphic HymnsOrfeoOrphic
In Greek mythology, Lyra represents the lyre of Orpheus.
Orpheus' lyre was carried to heaven by the Muses, and was placed among the stars.

Epsilon Lyrae

ε 1 LyrThe Double Doubleε
Epsilon Lyrae, known informally as the Double Double, is a complex multiple star system.
Epsilon Lyrae (ε Lyr, ε Lyrae), also known as The Double Double, is a multiple star system of at least five stars approximately 162 light-years away in the constellation of Lyra.

Gamma Lyrae

γ LyrSulafatGamma
South of Delta is Gamma Lyrae, a blue giant and the second-brightest star in the constellation.
Gamma Lyrae (Latinized from γ Lyrae, abbreviated Gamma Lyr, γ Lyr), formally named Sulafat, is the second-brightest star in the northern constellation of Lyra.

Delta Lyrae cluster

Stephenson 1
Both systems, however, have very similar radial velocities, and are the two brightest members of a sparse open cluster known as the Delta Lyrae cluster.
Delta Lyrae cluster is a sparse open cluster of stars located about 1,220 light years away in the northern constellation of Lyra.

Deneb

Alpha CygniAridedα Cyg
Vega forms one corner of the famous Summer Triangle asterism; along with Altair and Deneb, these three stars form a prominent triangle during the northern hemisphere summer.
It also lies at one vertex of the prominent and widely spaced asterism called the Summer Triangle, shared with the first-magnitude stars Vega in the constellation Lyra and Altair in Aquila.

RR Lyrae

RR Lyr
In the extreme east is RR Lyrae, the prototype of the large class of variables known as RR Lyrae variables, which are pulsating variables similar to Cepheids, but are evolved population II stars of spectral types A and F. Such stars are usually not found in a galaxy's thin disk, but rather in the galactic halo.
RR Lyrae is a variable star in the Lyra constellation, figuring in its west near to Cygnus.

FL Lyrae

FL Lyr
Even further north is FL Lyrae, a much fainter 9th-magnitude Algol variable that drops by half a magnitude every 2.18 days during the primary eclipse.
FL Lyrae is the variable star designation for an eclipsing binary star system in the northern constellation of Lyra.

R Lyrae

R Lyr13 Lyr
Another easy-to-spot variable is the bright R Lyrae, north of the main asterism.
R Lyrae is a 4th magnitude semiregular variable star in the constellation Lyra, approximately 350 light years away from Earth.

Kappa Lyrae

κ Lyr
The brightest star not included in the asterism and the westernmost cataloged by Bayer or Flamsteed is Kappa Lyrae, a typical red giant around 73 parsecs distant.
κ Lyrae, Latinized as Kappa Lyrae, is a solitary star in the northern constellation of Lyra, near the constellation border with Hercules.

Vulpecula

VulFoxVulpecula and Anser
Beginning at the north, Lyra is bordered by Draco, Hercules, Vulpecula, and Cygnus.

IAU designated constellations

88 modern constellations88 constellationsmodern constellation
Covering 286.5 square degrees, it ranks 52nd of the 88 modern constellations in size.

HP Lyrae

HP Lyr
Also nearby is the faint HP Lyrae, a post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star that shows variability.
HP Lyrae (HP Lyr) is a variable star in the constellation Lyra, with a visual magnitude varying 10.2 and 10.8.

Eta Lyrae

η LyrAladfarη Lyr (Aladfar)
Just north of Theta and of almost exactly the same magnitude is Eta Lyrae, a blue subgiant with a near-solar metal abundance.
Eta Lyrae (η Lyrae, abbreviated Eta Lyr, η Lyr) is the primary or 'A' component of a triple star system in the constellation of Lyra.

Pole star

polar starNorth StarSouth Star
Vega was the pole star in the year 12,000 BCE, and will again become the pole star around 14,000 CE.
Precession will then point the north celestial pole nearer the constellation Lyra, where the second brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere, Vega, will be a pole star around 13,700 AD, though at a distance of 5° from celestial north.

Draco (constellation)

DracoDraco constellationDragone
Beginning at the north, Lyra is bordered by Draco, Hercules, Vulpecula, and Cygnus.

16 Lyrae

16 Lyr
It can be found less than a degree away from the naked-eye star 16 Lyrae, a 5th-magnitude A-type subgiant located around 37 parsecs distant.
16 Lyrae is a suspected astrometric binary star system in the constellation Lyra, located 126 light years away from the Sun based on parallax.