Lyric poetry

lyriclyric poetlyric poemlyricallyrical poetrylyric poemslyricslyrical poemslyric poetslyrical poem
Lyric poetry is a formal type of poetry which expresses personal emotions or feelings, typically spoken in the first person.wikipedia
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Greek lyric

Greek lyric poetlyric poetGreek lyric poetry
The term derives from a form of Ancient Greek literature, the lyric, which was defined by its musical accompaniment, usually on a stringed instrument known as a lyre.
Greek lyric is the body of lyric poetry written in dialects of Ancient Greek.

Lyre

bowl lyrelyrabell lyre
The term derives from a form of Ancient Greek literature, the lyric, which was defined by its musical accompaniment, usually on a stringed instrument known as a lyre.
In Ancient Greece, recitations of lyric poetry were accompanied by lyre playing.

Anacreon

AnakreonAnacreontic genreanacreontic verse
These archaic and classical musician-poets included Sappho, Alcaeus, Anacreon and Pindar.
582 BC) was a Greek lyric poet, notable for his drinking songs and hymns.

Ancient Greek literature

GreekAncient GreekGreek literature
The term derives from a form of Ancient Greek literature, the lyric, which was defined by its musical accompaniment, usually on a stringed instrument known as a lyre. In France, La Pléiade—including Pierre de Ronsard, Joachim du Bellay, and Jean-Antoine de Baïf—aimed to break with earlier traditions of French poetry—particularly Marot and the grands rhétoriqueurs—and began imitating classical Greek and Roman forms such as the odes.
Lyric poetry received its name from the fact that it was originally sung by individuals or a chorus accompanied by the instrument called the lyre.

Horace

Quintus Horatius FlaccusHoratiusHoratian
Among the major extant Roman poets of the classical period, only Catullus (N° 11, 17, 30, 34, 51, 61) and Horace (Odes) wrote lyric poetry, which in the disputed view of some commentators was no longer meant to be sung but instead read or recited.
Quintus Horatius Flaccus (8 December 65 BC – 27 November 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus (also known as Octavian).

Odes (Horace)

OdesCarminaOde
Among the major extant Roman poets of the classical period, only Catullus (N° 11, 17, 30, 34, 51, 61) and Horace (Odes) wrote lyric poetry, which in the disputed view of some commentators was no longer meant to be sung but instead read or recited.
The Odes (Carmina) are a collection in four books of Latin lyric poems by Horace.

Nine Lyric Poets

lyric poetLyric poetsnine melic poets
The scholars of Hellenistic Alexandria created a canon of nine lyric poets deemed especially worthy of critical study.
Thus, some types of poetry which would be included under the label "lyric poetry," in modern criticism are excluded—namely, the elegy and iambus which were performed with flutes.

Sappho

Sappho of LesbosSapphicSapho
These archaic and classical musician-poets included Sappho, Alcaeus, Anacreon and Pindar.
She is best known for her lyric poetry, written to be accompanied by music.

Metre (poetry)

metremeterprosody
The Greeks and Romans also used a number of lyric metres, which were typically used for shorter poems than elegiacs or hexameter.

Hafez

HafizHafiz ShiraziHafez Shirazi
Notable authors include Hafiz, Amir Khusro, Auhadi of Maragheh, Alisher Navoi, Obeid e zakani, Khaqani Shirvani, Anvari, Farid al-Din Attar, Omar Khayyam, and Rudaki.
Hafez primarily wrote in the literary genre of lyric poetry, or ghazals, that is the ideal style for expressing the ecstasy of divine inspiration in the mystical form of love poems.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

GoetheJohann Wolfgang GoetheJohann von Goethe
The ghazal was introduced to European poetry in the early 19th century by the Germans Schlegel, Von Hammer-Purgstall, and Goethe, who called Hafiz his "twin".
His works include: four novels; epic and lyric poetry; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; and treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour.

Troubadour

troubadourstroubadortroubadors
The troubadors, travelling composers and performers of songs, began to flourish towards the end of the 11th century and were often imitated in successive centuries.
A troubadour (, ; trobador ) was a composer and performer of Old Occitan lyric poetry during the High Middle Ages (1100–1350).

Epic poetry

epic poemepicepics
The term owes its importance in literary theory to the division developed by Aristotle between three broad categories of poetry: lyrical, dramatic, and epic.
In his work Poetics, Aristotle defines an epic as one of the forms of poetry, contrasted with lyric poetry and with drama in the form of tragedy and comedy.

Trouvère

trouvèrestrouvereromance
Trouvères were poet-composers who were roughly contemporary with and influenced by the troubadours but who composed their works in the northern dialects of France.
It refers to poet-composers who were roughly contemporary with and influenced by the troubadours (composers and performers of Old Occitan lyric poetry during the High Middle Ages) but who composed their works in the northern dialects of France.

Poetry

poempoetpoems
Originating in 10th-century Persian, a ghazal is a poetic form consisting of couplets that share a rhyme and a refrain.
Later aestheticians identified three major genres: epic poetry, lyric poetry, and dramatic poetry, treating comedy and tragedy as subgenres of dramatic poetry.

Petrarch

Francesco PetrarcaPetrarcaFrancesco Petrarch
In Italy, Petrarch developed the sonnet form pioneered by Giacomo da Lentini and Dante's Vita Nuova.
Petrarch's sonnets were admired and imitated throughout Europe during the Renaissance and became a model for lyrical poetry.

Galician-Portuguese lyric

trovadorismotroubadourGalician-Portuguese troubadours
There was also a large body of medieval Galician-Portuguese lyric.
In the Middle Ages, the Galician-Portuguese lyric, also known as trovadorismo in Portugal and trobadorismo in Galicia, was a lyric poetic school or movement.

Ode

odes ode odal hymn
In France, La Pléiade—including Pierre de Ronsard, Joachim du Bellay, and Jean-Antoine de Baïf—aimed to break with earlier traditions of French poetry—particularly Marot and the grands rhétoriqueurs—and began imitating classical Greek and Roman forms such as the odes.
An ode (from ) is a type of lyrical stanza.

Verse drama and dramatic verse

verse dramaverse playdramatic poem
The term owes its importance in literary theory to the division developed by Aristotle between three broad categories of poetry: lyrical, dramatic, and epic.

Ben Jonson

JonsonBen JohnsonBenjamin Jonson
Other notable poets of the era include Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick, George Herbert, Aphra Behn, Thomas Carew, John Suckling, Richard Lovelace, John Milton, Richard Crashaw, and Henry Vaughan.
1606), The Alchemist (1610) and Bartholomew Fair (1614) and for his lyric and epigrammatic poetry.

Robert Herrick (poet)

Robert HerrickHerrick Robert Herrick
Other notable poets of the era include Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick, George Herbert, Aphra Behn, Thomas Carew, John Suckling, Richard Lovelace, John Milton, Richard Crashaw, and Henry Vaughan.
Robert Herrick (baptised 24 August 1591–buried 15 October 1674) was a 17th-century English lyric poet and cleric.

Lope de Vega

Felix Lope de VegaFélix Lope de Vega y CarpioFélix Lope de '''Vega
Notable examples were Teresa of Ávila, John of the Cross, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Garcilaso de la Vega, and Lope de Vega.
He was also considered one of the best lyric poets in the Spanish language, and wrote several novels.

Courtly love

courtlinesslovepoetry
The lyric poetry of Europe in this period was created by the pioneers of courtly poetry and courtly love largely without reference to the classical past.
The medieval genres in which courtly love conventions can be found include the lyric, the romance and the allegory.

Percy Bysshe Shelley

ShelleyPercy ShelleyPercy Bysshe Shelly
Other important Romantic lyric writers of the period include Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Lord Byron.
Percy Bysshe Shelley ( 4 August 1792 – 8 July 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets, who is regarded by some as among the finest lyric and philosophical poets in the English language, and one of the most influential.

Pindar

PindaricPindarusancient Greek poet
These archaic and classical musician-poets included Sappho, Alcaeus, Anacreon and Pindar.