Métis in Canada

MétisMetisMétis peopleMétis people (Canada)Canadian MétisFrench MétisMétis CanadianMétis NationMétis people of CanadaCanada
The Métis in Canada are specific cultural communities who trace their descent to First Nations and European settlers, primarily the French, in the early decades of colonisation.wikipedia
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Coureur des bois

coureurs des boisvoyageurcoureurs de bois
The Métis peoples were respected as valuable employees of both fur trade companies, due to their skills as voyageurs, buffalo hunters, and interpreters, and their knowledge of the lands.
In James A. Michener's 1974 historical novel, Centennial and the 1978–1979 NBC television mini-series of the same name, the colorful, French Canadian or French Metis, coureur des bois, from Montreal, Quebec, Canada, named Pasquinel, was introduced as an early frontier mountain man and trapper, in 1795 Colorado, Spanish Upper Louisiana Territory of Mexico, now the present-day state of Colorado.

Vancouver Métis Community Association

Métis Community Association of Vancouver
Vancouver Métis Community Association is a Métis community organization in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Albert Ewing

Albert Freeman Ewing
Five men, sometimes dubbed "The Famous Five", (James P. Brady, Malcolm Norris, Peter Tomkins Jr., Joe Dion, Felix Callihoo) were instrumental in having the Alberta government form the 1934 "Ewing Commission", headed by Albert Ewing, to deal with land claims.
He headed a famous commission known as the Ewing Commission from December 12, 1934, to 1936 to look at issues affecting the Métis population including land claims, hunting rights and treaty status.

Indigenous peoples of the Americas

Native AmericanNative Americansindigenous
Indigenous peoples are commonly known in Canada as Aboriginal peoples, which includes not only First Nations and Arctic Inuit, but also the minority population of First Nations-European mixed race Métis people who identify culturally and ethnically with indigenous peoplehood.

Battle of Frenchman's Butte

at Frenchman's ButteBattle of Frenchman Butte National Historic SiteFrenchman Butte
A band of Cree led by war chief Wandering Spirit, living in what is now central Alberta and Saskatchewan joined the North-West Rebellion of 1885 after the Métis success at the Battle of Duck Lake.

Mestizo

Mestizosmestizamestizaje
In Ontario and western Canada, the Métis people are a distinct community composed of the descendants of Europeans (usually French or Scottish, sometimes English) involved in the fur trade and Canadian First Nations peoples (especially Cree and Anishinaabe; it does not include people of mixed European and Inuit ancestry).

Métis Population Betterment Act

Metis ActMetis Population Betterment Act
The Alberta government passed the Métis Population Betterment Act in 1938.
The Métis Population Betterment Act was a 1938 act of the Alberta Legislature in Canada that created a committee of members of the Métis and the government to plot out lands for allocation to the Métis.

Frog Lake Massacre

Frog LakeattackFrog Lake, Saskatchewan
Learning of the Métis victory at the Battle of Duck Lake a week earlier and of Poundmaker's advance on Battleford, Wandering Spirit, the war chief of Big Bear's band, began a campaign to gather arms, ammunition and food supplies from the surrounding countryside.

Battle of Loon Lake

Steele NarrowsLoon Lake
Led by Major Sam Steele, a force of North-West Mounted Police, Alberta Mounted Rifles and Steele's Scouts (a body of mounted militia raised by Steele himself) caught up with and dispersed a band of Plains Cree warriors and their white and Métis hostages.

Métis Child and Family Services Society

Metis Child and Family Services Society
as a non-profit organizations that exist in areas of high Métis populations.

Infinity symbol

infinity sign∞
Both flags use the same design of a central infinity symbol, but are different colours.
For instance, the Métis flag, used by the Canadian Métis people in the early 19th century, is based around this symbol.

Métis flag

Flag of the Métis Nation of Canada
The Métis flag is one of the oldest patriotic flags originating in Canada.

2016 Canadian Census

2016 Census of Population2016 CensusCanada 2016 Census

Irish Canadians

IrishIrish CanadianIrish-Canadian
They clashed with Catholic Metis leader Louis Riel's provisional government during the Red River Rebellion, and as a result Thomas Scott was executed, inflaming sectarian tensions in the east.

Wabanaki Confederacy

WabanakiWabenakiIndigenous peoples
The women in the unions in eastern Canada were usually Wabanaki, Algonquin, and Menominee; and in western Canada they were Saulteaux, Cree, Ojibwe, Nakoda, and Dakota/Lakota, or of mixed descent from these peoples.

Algonquin people

AlgonquinAlgonquinsAlgonquin Nation
The women in the unions in eastern Canada were usually Wabanaki, Algonquin, and Menominee; and in western Canada they were Saulteaux, Cree, Ojibwe, Nakoda, and Dakota/Lakota, or of mixed descent from these peoples.

Menominee

MenominiMenominee Indian Tribe of WisconsinMenominee Indians
The women in the unions in eastern Canada were usually Wabanaki, Algonquin, and Menominee; and in western Canada they were Saulteaux, Cree, Ojibwe, Nakoda, and Dakota/Lakota, or of mixed descent from these peoples.

Marriage 'à la façon du pays'

Marriage ''à la façon du pays''country marriageEuropean men married Aboriginal women
Their unions with European men engaged in the fur trade in the Old Northwest were often of the type known as Marriage à la façon du pays ("according to the custom of the country").

New France

FrenchCanadaNouvelle-France
After New France was ceded to Great Britain's control in 1763, there was an important distinction between French Métis born of francophone voyageur fathers, and the Anglo-Métis (known as "countryborn" or Mixed Bloods, for instance in the 1870 census of Manitoba) descended from English or Scottish fathers.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
After New France was ceded to Great Britain's control in 1763, there was an important distinction between French Métis born of francophone voyageur fathers, and the Anglo-Métis (known as "countryborn" or Mixed Bloods, for instance in the 1870 census of Manitoba) descended from English or Scottish fathers.

English people

EnglishEnglishmanEnglishmen
After New France was ceded to Great Britain's control in 1763, there was an important distinction between French Métis born of francophone voyageur fathers, and the Anglo-Métis (known as "countryborn" or Mixed Bloods, for instance in the 1870 census of Manitoba) descended from English or Scottish fathers.

Scottish people

ScottishScotsScot
After New France was ceded to Great Britain's control in 1763, there was an important distinction between French Métis born of francophone voyageur fathers, and the Anglo-Métis (known as "countryborn" or Mixed Bloods, for instance in the 1870 census of Manitoba) descended from English or Scottish fathers.

Homeland

Fatherlandmotherlandmother country
While people of Métis culture or heritage are found across Canada, the traditional Métis "homeland" (areas where Métis populations and culture developed as a distinct ethnicity historically) includes much of the Canadian Prairies.