Māori language revival

Kohanga Reokōhanga reoMāori language revival movementa revivalKura Kaupapa MāoriMaori language revivalMāori language activistMāori language revitalisation effortMāori-language revivalrevitalising Māori language
The Māori language revival is a movement to promote, reinforce and strengthen the use of te reo Māori, the Māori language.wikipedia
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Māori language

MāoriMaorite reo Māori
The Māori language revival is a movement to promote, reinforce and strengthen the use of te reo Māori, the Māori language.
The number of speakers of the language has declined sharply since 1945, but a Māori language revitalisation effort slowed the decline, and the language has experienced a revival, particularly since about 2015.

Māori renaissance

cultural revivalMāori cultural renaissance
The movement is part of a broader Māori renaissance.
The renaissance happened across a number of spheres, including the revival of the Māori language with the founding of the first kōhanga reo in 1982 and the passing of the Māori Language Act in 1987; the land-focused Māori protest movement, with the Bastion Point occupation in 1977–1978; the Springbok tour which led to international indigenous peoples connections; and the landmark Te Maori art exhibition in which Māori exhibited Māori art internationally for the first time.

Kura Kaupapa Māori

Māori immersion schoolKura Kaupapakaupapa Māori
In 1989 official support was given for Kura Kaupapa Māori—primary and secondary Māori-language immersion schools. The success of kōhanga reo is such that they have been followed by the establishment of primary schools and secondary schools (Kura Kaupapa Māori) where Māori is the primary language of instruction.
Kura Kaupapa Māori are Māori-language immersion schools (kura) in New Zealand where the philosophy and practice reflect Māori cultural values with the aim of revitalising Māori language, knowledge and culture.

Language nest

language nestskohanga reo
In response, Māori leaders initiated Māori-language recovery-programs such as the Kōhanga Reo ("language nests") movement, which from 1982 immersed infants in Māori from infancy to school age.
Language nests originated in New Zealand in the 1980s, as a part of the Māori-language revival in that country.

Jean Puketapu

Jean Gloria Edith Puketapu
Jean Puketapu and Iritana Tawhiwhirangi were among the early leaders when the first kōhanga reo was founded in Wainuiomata in 1982.
Jean Gloria Edith Puketapu or Jean Puketapu-Waiwai (26 July 1931 – 31 July 2012) was a Ngāi Tūhoe Māori language activist and co-founder of the first kōhanga reo.

Iritana Tāwhiwhirangi

Iritana TawhiwhirangiIritana Te Rangi TāwhiwhirangiDame Iritana Tāwhiwhirangi
Jean Puketapu and Iritana Tawhiwhirangi were among the early leaders when the first kōhanga reo was founded in Wainuiomata in 1982.
Dame Iritana Te Rangi Tāwhiwhirangi (born 21 March 1929) is a New Zealand advocate of Māori language education and the Kohanga Reo movement.

Language revitalization

Language revivalrevitalizationrevival
Kōhanga Reo is a whānau (family) development and language-revitalisation initiative grounded in Māori cultural principles and ideals.
See Māori language revival.

Pūnana Leo

ʻAha Pūnana LeoAha Punana Leo
A notable example being Pūnana Leo established in Hawaii to revitalise the indigenous Hawaiian language.
Based on the practices of 19th-century Hawaiian-language schools, as well as the Kohanga reo Māori language kindergartens in New Zealand, the Pūnana Leo was the first indigenous language immersion preschool project in the United States.

Māori people

MāoriMaoriNew Zealand Māori
The Māori language revival is a movement to promote, reinforce and strengthen the use of te reo Māori, the Māori language.

London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
Primarily in New Zealand, but also in places with large numbers of expatriate New Zealanders (such as London and Melbourne), the movement aims to increase the use of Māori in the home, in education, government and business.

Melbourne

Melbourne, AustraliaMelbourne, VictoriaGreater Melbourne
Primarily in New Zealand, but also in places with large numbers of expatriate New Zealanders (such as London and Melbourne), the movement aims to increase the use of Māori in the home, in education, government and business.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
Until World War II (1939–1945) most Māori people spoke Māori as their first language but by the 1980s fewer than 20 per cent of Māori spoke the language well enough to be classed as native speakers.

Leadership

leaderleadersLeader of the
In response, Māori leaders initiated Māori-language recovery-programs such as the Kōhanga Reo ("language nests") movement, which from 1982 immersed infants in Māori from infancy to school age.

Maori Language Act 1987

Māori Language ActMāori Language Act 1987Maori Language Act
The Māori Language Act 1987 was passed as a response to the Waitangi Tribunal finding that the Māori language was a taonga, a treasure or valued possession, under the Treaty of Waitangi.

Waitangi Tribunal

The Waitangi Tribunal/Te Rōpū Whakamana i te TiritiTreaty of Waitangi claimTreaty of Waitangi Tribunal
The Māori Language Act 1987 was passed as a response to the Waitangi Tribunal finding that the Māori language was a taonga, a treasure or valued possession, under the Treaty of Waitangi.

Taonga

taokataonga Māoritreasures
The Māori Language Act 1987 was passed as a response to the Waitangi Tribunal finding that the Māori language was a taonga, a treasure or valued possession, under the Treaty of Waitangi.

Official language

official languagesofficialadministrative language
The Act gave te reo Māori official-language status, and gave speakers a right to use it in legal settings such as in court.

Māori Language Commission

Maori Language CommissionTe Taura WhiriTe Taura Whiri I te Reo Maori (Maori Language Commission)
It also established the Māori Language Commission (initially called Te Komihana Mo Te Reo Māori but later renamed Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori) to promote the language and provide advice on it.

Whānau

whanau
Kōhanga Reo is a whānau (family) development and language-revitalisation initiative grounded in Māori cultural principles and ideals.

Māori culture

MāoriMaoriculture
Kōhanga Reo is a whānau (family) development and language-revitalisation initiative grounded in Māori cultural principles and ideals.

Kaumātua

kaumatuakuiakaumatua and kuia
The kōhanga reo movement operates from the Māori philosophical world view and is principally guided by kaumātua (respected elders).

Marae

meeting placetribal meeting groundmeeting ground
Daily activities may take place anywhere that is safe and warm including marae (traditional community meeting places), converted homes or purpose-built centres.

Tikanga Māori

tikangacultureMāori customs
Emerging in the late 1970s at the direction of kaumātua, kōhanga reo was an immediate and urgent response to the decline of te reo Māori (Māori language) and tikanga Māori (Māori culture, cultural habits and practices).

Wainuiomata

Arakura SchoolSt Claudine Thevenet School
Jean Puketapu and Iritana Tawhiwhirangi were among the early leaders when the first kōhanga reo was founded in Wainuiomata in 1982.

Primary school

elementary schoolprimaryelementary
The success of kōhanga reo is such that they have been followed by the establishment of primary schools and secondary schools (Kura Kaupapa Māori) where Māori is the primary language of instruction.