A report on Māori people

Māori performing a haka (2012)
Māori performing a haka (2012)
The Māori settlement of New Zealand represents an end-point of a long chain of island-hopping voyages in the South Pacific.
Early Archaic period objects from the Wairau Bar archaeological site, on display at the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch
Model of a pā (hillfort) built on a headland. Pā proliferated as competition and warfare increased among a growing population.
The first European impression of Māori, at Murderers' Bay in Abel Tasman's travel journal (1642)
Depiction of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, bringing New Zealand and the Māori into the British Empire
Members of the 28th (Māori) Battalion performing a haka, Egypt (July 1941)
Whina Cooper leading the Māori Land March in 1975, seeking redress for historical grievances
Wharenui (meeting house) at Ōhinemutu village, Rotorua (tekoteko on the top)
A Māori chief with tattoos (moko) seen by James Cook and his crew. Hand-colored engraving by Thomas Chambers after original 1769 drawing by Sydney Parkinson
Māori woman with a representation of the Waikato Ancestress "Te Iringa"
A young man performing in a kapa haka group at a Rotorua tourist venue
A haka performed by the national rugby union team before a game
Māori whānau from Rotorua in the 1880s.
Whenuakura Marae in Taranaki.
Protest hikoi during the foreshore and seabed controversy in 2004
New Zealand endorsed the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in April 2010.
The opening of the Māori Parliament at Pāpāwai, Greytown in 1897, with Richard Seddon in attendance
Tino Rangatiratanga flag 1990
Witi Ihimaera
Taika Waititi
Temuera Morrison
Keisha Castle-Hughes
Māori in New Zealand in 2018
Speakers of Māori according to the 2013 census 
Less than 5%
More than 5%
More than 10%
More than 20%
More than 30%
More than 40%
More than 50%

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of mainland New Zealand (Aotearoa).

- Māori people
Māori performing a haka (2012)

117 related topics with Alpha

Overall

New Zealand

20 links

Island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean.

Island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean.

Detail from a 1657 map showing the western coastline of Nova Zeelandia (in this map, North is at the bottom).
The Māori people descend from Polynesians whose ancestors emigrated from Taiwan to Melanesia between 3000 and 1000 BCE and then travelled east, reaching the Society Islands c. 1000 CE. After a pause of 200 to 300 years, a new wave of exploration led to the discovery and settlement of New Zealand.
Map of the New Zealand coastline as Cook charted it on his first visit in 1769–70. The track of the Endeavour is also shown.
The Waitangi sheet from the Treaty of Waitangi
A meeting of European and Māori inhabitants of Hawke's Bay Province. Engraving, 1863.
A statue of Richard Seddon, the "Beehive" (Executive Wing), and Parliament House (right), in Parliament Grounds, Wellington.
Māori Battalion haka in Egypt, 1941
Anzac Day service at the National War Memorial
Map of regions (coloured) and territorial authorities (outlined) in New Zealand.
The snow-capped Southern Alps dominate the South Island, while the North Island's Northland Peninsula stretches towards the subtropics.
The endemic flightless kiwi is a national icon.
The giant Haast's eagle died out when humans hunted its main prey, the moa, to extinction.
Waterfront along Auckland CBD, a major hub of economic activity
Milford Sound / Piopiotahi is one of New Zealand's most famous tourist destinations.
Wool has historically been one of New Zealand's major exports.
A Boeing 787–9 Dreamliner of Air New Zealand, the flag carrier of New Zealand
Population pyramid (2017)
Pedestrians on Queen Street in Auckland, an ethnically diverse city
A Rātana church on a hill near Raetihi. The two-tower construction is characteristic of Rātana buildings.
Portrait of Hinepare of Ngāti Kahungunu by Gottfried Lindauer, showing chin moko, pounamu hei-tiki and woven cloak
The Hobbiton Movie Set, located near Matamata, was used for The Lord of the Rings film trilogy.
A haka performed by the national rugby union team ("All Blacks") before a game. The haka is a challenge with vigorous movements and stamping of the feet.
Ingredients to be prepared for a hāngi
Rural scene near Queenstown
Hokitika Gorge, West Coast
The Emerald Lakes, Mt Tongariro
Lake Gunn
Pencarrow Head, Wellington
Speakers of Māori according to the 2013 census 
Less than 5%
More than 5%
More than 10%
More than 20%
More than 30%
More than 40%
More than 50%

In 1840, representatives of the United Kingdom and Māori chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi, which in its English version declared British sovereignty over the islands.

The Waitangi Sheet of the Treaty of Waitangi

Treaty of Waitangi

15 links

The Waitangi Sheet of the Treaty of Waitangi
James Busby, British Resident in New Zealand. He drafted a document known as the Declaration of the Independence of New Zealand.
Captain William Hobson
Rev Henry Williams, who translated the treaty into Māori with the help of his son Edward Marsh Williams.
A later reconstruction in a painting by Marcus King, depicting Tāmati Wāka Nene in the act of signing. Hobson is falsely shown in full uniform (he was actually wearing civilian clothing).
The location of Waitangi within New Zealand.
The group of nine documents that make up the Treaty of Waitangi.
214x214px
Beach front scene at Kohimarama, Auckland, circa 1860, with Bishop Selwyn's Mission station where the Kohimarama Conference was held. Two waka, and a group of whare, are visible in the foreground.
Lord and Lady Bledisloe announce the gift of land and Treaty House at Waitangi to the nation in 1932
Winston Peters (founder of the New Zealand First Party), who has campaigned for the removal of references to the Treaty of Waitangi from New Zealand Law
Reverse of a 1990 one dollar coin commemorating the sesquicentenary of the Treaty of Waitangi. Using a different design a much rarer New Zealand crown commemorative coin was also minted in 1935.

The Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is a treaty first signed on 6 February 1840 by Captain William Hobson as consul for the British Crown and Māori chiefs (rangatira) from the North Island of New Zealand.

"First Lessons in the Maori Language", 1862, by W. L. Williams, third Bishop of Waiapu

Māori language

9 links

"First Lessons in the Maori Language", 1862, by W. L. Williams, third Bishop of Waiapu
Bastion Point land rights activists with Māori-language signs
Bilingual sign in Broadwood, Northland.
North Island dialects
Part of the annotation to a Ralph Hotere exhibition at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, written bilingually in English and southern Māori. Note several regional variations, such as Nohoka (Nohoanga, a place or seat), tikaka (tikanga, customs), pako (pango, black), and whaka (whanga, harbour).
Diagram of pronouns in Māori. Grammatical person: ·
Speakers of Māori according to the 2013 census.
< 5%
5–10%
10–20%
20–30%
30–40%
40–50%
> 50%

Māori, also known as te reo ('the language'), or Te Reo Māori ('the language of Māori'), is an Eastern Polynesian language spoken by the Māori people, the indigenous population of mainland New Zealand.

A wharenui (meeting house) at Ōhinemutu village, Rotorua, with a tekoteko on the top

Māori culture

8 links

A wharenui (meeting house) at Ōhinemutu village, Rotorua, with a tekoteko on the top
Early Māori objects similar to Polynesian forms (Wairau Bar, Marlborough), note the volcanic glass from the North Island (top left)
Traditional formal dress of the Classic/contact period, including a dog-skin cloak (kahu kuri), and a mere or patu (short edged weapon).
Traditional formal dress of the Classic/contact period. A hei-tiki around her neck, pounamu earring and shark tooth earring, and two huia feathers in her hair.
Haka party, waiting to perform for Duke of York in Rotorua, 1901
Traditional Māori Waitangi Day celebrations at Waitangi
Māori protesters near Waitangi on Waitangi Day, the national day of New Zealand
A tohunga under tapu could not eat with their hands for an extended period.
A hongi (greeting) for Dame Patsy Reddy from Kuia Dr Hiria Hape
Matariki (Pleiades), the rising of which marks the Māori New Year.
Tama-te-kapua, ancestor of Te Arawa, depicted in a carving at Tamatekapua meeting house in Ohinemutu, Rotorua, circa 1880.
A woman with tā moko
Charcoal rock drawing at Carters rockpool on the Opihi River
Painted rafter pattern
Rain cape (pākē) made out of harakeke New Zealand flax fibre muka, with outer layers of shredded tī kōuka, curdled harakeke pokinikini curled tags and muka.
Performance of poi from a kapa haka group (2003)
Māori All Blacks perform the haka on tour of North America (2013)
Taika Waititi at the 2019 San Diego Comic-Con
Rotowhio-Marae, Rotorua
Carved wharenui at Waitangi marae
Māori greeting (pōwhiri) on a marae
Pataka with tekoteko
A Māori village, c. late 1800s
Church near Onuku marae, Banks Peninsula. Opened in 1878 as the first non-denominational church in New Zealand.
A group of Māori children on a morere swing (1847)
Pits where kumara were stored to protect them over the winter.
Hāngi or earth ovens are still used today to cook food
Waka (canoes) are built in a variety of sizes depending on their purpose, including deep-sea fishing, river crossings or historically war and migration.
Maori war canoe, drawing by Alexander Sporing, Cook's first voyage, 1769
The Māori Battalion in North Africa (1941), the most well known example of the consistent Māori involvement in New Zealand's military

Māori culture (Māoritanga) is the customs, cultural practices, and beliefs of the indigenous Māori people of New Zealand.

Moriori family c. 1910

Moriori

6 links

The Moriori are the native Polynesian people of the Chatham Islands (Rēkohu in Moriori; Wharekauri in Māori), New Zealand.

The Moriori are the native Polynesian people of the Chatham Islands (Rēkohu in Moriori; Wharekauri in Māori), New Zealand.

Moriori family c. 1910
Moriori designs carved into trees and rock.
Moriori tree carving or dendroglyph
Moriori people in the late 19th century: these three men (standing) are wearing a mix of traditional and European clothing. They carry defensive staffs and wear flax mats around the waist and shoulders, feathers on the front of the head, and albatross tufts in their beards.
Tommy Solomon, acknowledged as the last Moriori of unmixed ancestry.
A repatriation ceremony at Te Papa, bringing home Māori and Moriori skeletal remains that were removed from New Zealand in the 19th Century. (2018)

Moriori originated from Māori settlers from the New Zealand mainland around 1500 CE.

Memorial in the Auckland War Memorial Museum for all who died in the New Zealand Wars. "Kia mate toa" translates as "fight unto death" or "be strong in death", and is the motto of the Otago and Southland Regiment of the New Zealand Army. The flags are the Union Jack and from Gate Pā.

New Zealand Wars

7 links

Memorial in the Auckland War Memorial Museum for all who died in the New Zealand Wars. "Kia mate toa" translates as "fight unto death" or "be strong in death", and is the motto of the Otago and Southland Regiment of the New Zealand Army. The flags are the Union Jack and from Gate Pā.
Memorial in the Auckland War Memorial Museum for all who died in the New Zealand Wars. "Kia mate toa" translates as "fight unto death" or "be strong in death", and is the motto of the Otago and Southland Regiment of the New Zealand Army. The flags are the Union Jack and from Gate Pā.
Hone Heke cuts down the flagstaff on Flagstaff Hill at Kororāreka.
Governor (and later Premier) Sir George Grey in the 1860s.
The gunboat Pioneer at Meremere during the Invasion of the Waikato.
The Armed Constabulary ambushed by Titokowaru's forces at Te Ngutu o Te Manu
NCOs of the 58th Regiment of the Foot in New Zealand, date unknown.
Chief Rawiri Puaha of Ngati Toa who fought alongside Colonial forces at the Battle of Battle Hill.
Gustavus Von Tempsky, captain of the Forest Rangers.
Chief Rewi Maniapoto
Attack on a Māori pā by Sir James Edward Alexander, Commander of the West Yorkshire Regiment.
New Zealand Wars Memorial in Symonds Street, Auckland. The bronze statue at the base of the memorial is Zealandia.
Monument erected at Anglesea Barracks, Hobart, Van Dieman's Land in 1850, in memory of the soldiers of the 99th Regiment of Foot who were killed during the New Zealand campaign of 1845–46

The New Zealand Wars took place from 1845 to 1872 between the New Zealand Colonial government and allied Māori on one side and Māori and Māori-allied settlers on the other.

The Polynesian spread of colonization of the Pacific throughout the so-called Polynesian Triangle.

Polynesians

5 links

Ethnolinguistic group of closely related people who are native to Polynesia , an expansive region of Oceania in the Pacific Ocean.

Ethnolinguistic group of closely related people who are native to Polynesia , an expansive region of Oceania in the Pacific Ocean.

The Polynesian spread of colonization of the Pacific throughout the so-called Polynesian Triangle.
Chronological dispersal of the Austronesian peoples
1827 depiction of Tahitian pahi double-hulled war canoes
Female dancers of the Hawaii Islands depicted by Louis Choris, c. 1816
A portrait of Māori man, by Gottfried Lindauer.
Kava ('ava) makers (aumaga) of Samoa. A woman seated between two men with the round tanoa (or laulau) wooden bowl in front. Standing is a third man, distributor of the 'ava, holding the coconut shell cup (tauau) used for distributing the beverage.

Polynesians, including Samoans, Tongans, Niueans, Cook Islands Māori, Tahitian Mā'ohi, Hawaiian Māoli, Marquesans and New Zealand Māori, are a subset of the Austronesian peoples.

Musket Wars

5 links

The Musket Wars were a series of as many as 3,000 battles and raids fought throughout New Zealand (including the Chatham Islands) among Māori between 1807 and 1837, after Māori first obtained muskets and then engaged in an intertribal arms race in order to gain territory or seek revenge for past defeats.

Āpirana Ngata in 1934

Āpirana Ngata

5 links

Prominent New Zealand statesman.

Prominent New Zealand statesman.

Āpirana Ngata in 1934
Arihia Ngata, Ngata's first wife
Ngata c. 1905
Ngata and Te Rangi Hīroa alongside a tukutuku panel at Ngata's home, during an expedition by Elsdon Best, James Ingram McDonald and Johannes Andersen.
Coalition Cabinet of 1931. Ngata is seated on the front row, second from right.
All 52 Members of the Liberal Party of the 17th parliament
Te Rīringi, Ngata's second wife
Ngata on New Zealand's $50 banknote

He has often been described as the foremost Māori politician to have served in Parliament in the mid-20th century, and is also known for his work in promoting and protecting Māori culture and language.

Early activism over the issue of sporting contacts with apartheid South Africa

Māori protest movement

3 links

Broad indigenous-rights movement in New Zealand .

Broad indigenous-rights movement in New Zealand .

Early activism over the issue of sporting contacts with apartheid South Africa
Whina Cooper leads the Māori Land March through Hamilton in 1975
Moutoa Gardens in Whanganui. Seen in this photo: the Kemp Monument, the Māori War Memorial, the School Memorial and the Moutoa Monument.
Huntly and the Waikato, New Zealand 1991
The foreshore and seabed hikoi outside Parliament
Tame Iti at gallery opening 13 October 2009
Annette Sykes
Approximate area of the Urewera mountain range.
Tino Rangatiratanga flag

Most members of the movement have been Māori but it has attracted some support from pākehā (non-Māori) New Zealanders and internationally, particularly from other indigenous peoples.