A report on Māori protest movement

Early activism over the issue of sporting contacts with apartheid South Africa
Whina Cooper leads the Māori Land March through Hamilton in 1975
Moutoa Gardens in Whanganui. Seen in this photo: the Kemp Monument, the Māori War Memorial, the School Memorial and the Moutoa Monument.
Huntly and the Waikato, New Zealand 1991
The foreshore and seabed hikoi outside Parliament
Tame Iti at gallery opening 13 October 2009
Annette Sykes
Approximate area of the Urewera mountain range.
Tino Rangatiratanga flag

Broad indigenous-rights movement in New Zealand .

- Māori protest movement
Early activism over the issue of sporting contacts with apartheid South Africa

18 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Māori performing a haka (2012)

Māori people

3 links

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of mainland New Zealand (Aotearoa).

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of mainland New Zealand (Aotearoa).

Māori performing a haka (2012)
Māori performing a haka (2012)
The Māori settlement of New Zealand represents an end-point of a long chain of island-hopping voyages in the South Pacific.
Early Archaic period objects from the Wairau Bar archaeological site, on display at the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch
Model of a pā (hillfort) built on a headland. Pā proliferated as competition and warfare increased among a growing population.
The first European impression of Māori, at Murderers' Bay in Abel Tasman's travel journal (1642)
Depiction of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, bringing New Zealand and the Māori into the British Empire
Members of the 28th (Māori) Battalion performing a haka, Egypt (July 1941)
Whina Cooper leading the Māori Land March in 1975, seeking redress for historical grievances
Wharenui (meeting house) at Ōhinemutu village, Rotorua (tekoteko on the top)
A Māori chief with tattoos (moko) seen by James Cook and his crew. Hand-colored engraving by Thomas Chambers after original 1769 drawing by Sydney Parkinson
Māori woman with a representation of the Waikato Ancestress "Te Iringa"
A young man performing in a kapa haka group at a Rotorua tourist venue
A haka performed by the national rugby union team before a game
Māori whānau from Rotorua in the 1880s.
Whenuakura Marae in Taranaki.
Protest hikoi during the foreshore and seabed controversy in 2004
New Zealand endorsed the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in April 2010.
The opening of the Māori Parliament at Pāpāwai, Greytown in 1897, with Richard Seddon in attendance
Tino Rangatiratanga flag 1990
Witi Ihimaera
Taika Waititi
Temuera Morrison
Keisha Castle-Hughes
Māori in New Zealand in 2018
Speakers of Māori according to the 2013 census 
Less than 5%
More than 5%
More than 10%
More than 20%
More than 30%
More than 40%
More than 50%

Traditional Māori culture has thereby enjoyed a significant revival, which was further bolstered by a Māori protest movement that emerged in the 1960s.

New Zealand

3 links

Island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean.

Island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean.

Detail from a 1657 map showing the western coastline of Nova Zeelandia (in this map, North is at the bottom).
The Māori people descend from Polynesians whose ancestors emigrated from Taiwan to Melanesia between 3000 and 1000 BCE and then travelled east, reaching the Society Islands c. 1000 CE. After a pause of 200 to 300 years, a new wave of exploration led to the discovery and settlement of New Zealand.
Map of the New Zealand coastline as Cook charted it on his first visit in 1769–70. The track of the Endeavour is also shown.
The Waitangi sheet from the Treaty of Waitangi
A meeting of European and Māori inhabitants of Hawke's Bay Province. Engraving, 1863.
A statue of Richard Seddon, the "Beehive" (Executive Wing), and Parliament House (right), in Parliament Grounds, Wellington.
Māori Battalion haka in Egypt, 1941
Anzac Day service at the National War Memorial
Map of regions (coloured) and territorial authorities (outlined) in New Zealand.
The snow-capped Southern Alps dominate the South Island, while the North Island's Northland Peninsula stretches towards the subtropics.
The endemic flightless kiwi is a national icon.
The giant Haast's eagle died out when humans hunted its main prey, the moa, to extinction.
Waterfront along Auckland CBD, a major hub of economic activity
Milford Sound / Piopiotahi is one of New Zealand's most famous tourist destinations.
Wool has historically been one of New Zealand's major exports.
A Boeing 787–9 Dreamliner of Air New Zealand, the flag carrier of New Zealand
Population pyramid (2017)
Pedestrians on Queen Street in Auckland, an ethnically diverse city
A Rātana church on a hill near Raetihi. The two-tower construction is characteristic of Rātana buildings.
Portrait of Hinepare of Ngāti Kahungunu by Gottfried Lindauer, showing chin moko, pounamu hei-tiki and woven cloak
The Hobbiton Movie Set, located near Matamata, was used for The Lord of the Rings film trilogy.
A haka performed by the national rugby union team ("All Blacks") before a game. The haka is a challenge with vigorous movements and stamping of the feet.
Ingredients to be prepared for a hāngi
Rural scene near Queenstown
Hokitika Gorge, West Coast
The Emerald Lakes, Mt Tongariro
Lake Gunn
Pencarrow Head, Wellington
Speakers of Māori according to the 2013 census 
Less than 5%
More than 5%
More than 10%
More than 20%
More than 30%
More than 40%
More than 50%

A Māori protest movement developed, which criticised Eurocentrism and worked for greater recognition of Māori culture and of the Treaty of Waitangi.

A wharenui (meeting house) at Ōhinemutu village, Rotorua, with a tekoteko on the top

Māori culture

3 links

Customs, cultural practices, and beliefs of the indigenous Māori people of New Zealand.

Customs, cultural practices, and beliefs of the indigenous Māori people of New Zealand.

A wharenui (meeting house) at Ōhinemutu village, Rotorua, with a tekoteko on the top
Early Māori objects similar to Polynesian forms (Wairau Bar, Marlborough), note the volcanic glass from the North Island (top left)
Traditional formal dress of the Classic/contact period, including a dog-skin cloak (kahu kuri), and a mere or patu (short edged weapon).
Traditional formal dress of the Classic/contact period. A hei-tiki around her neck, pounamu earring and shark tooth earring, and two huia feathers in her hair.
Haka party, waiting to perform for Duke of York in Rotorua, 1901
Traditional Māori Waitangi Day celebrations at Waitangi
Māori protesters near Waitangi on Waitangi Day, the national day of New Zealand
A tohunga under tapu could not eat with their hands for an extended period.
A hongi (greeting) for Dame Patsy Reddy from Kuia Dr Hiria Hape
Matariki (Pleiades), the rising of which marks the Māori New Year.
Tama-te-kapua, ancestor of Te Arawa, depicted in a carving at Tamatekapua meeting house in Ohinemutu, Rotorua, circa 1880.
A woman with tā moko
Charcoal rock drawing at Carters rockpool on the Opihi River
Painted rafter pattern
Rain cape (pākē) made out of harakeke New Zealand flax fibre muka, with outer layers of shredded tī kōuka, curdled harakeke pokinikini curled tags and muka.
Performance of poi from a kapa haka group (2003)
Māori All Blacks perform the haka on tour of North America (2013)
Taika Waititi at the 2019 San Diego Comic-Con
Rotowhio-Marae, Rotorua
Carved wharenui at Waitangi marae
Māori greeting (pōwhiri) on a marae
Pataka with tekoteko
A Māori village, c. late 1800s
Church near Onuku marae, Banks Peninsula. Opened in 1878 as the first non-denominational church in New Zealand.
A group of Māori children on a morere swing (1847)
Pits where kumara were stored to protect them over the winter.
Hāngi or earth ovens are still used today to cook food
Waka (canoes) are built in a variety of sizes depending on their purpose, including deep-sea fishing, river crossings or historically war and migration.
Maori war canoe, drawing by Alexander Sporing, Cook's first voyage, 1769
The Māori Battalion in North Africa (1941), the most well known example of the consistent Māori involvement in New Zealand's military

Their advocacy was underscored by an increasing willingness to use vigorous protest to push Mana Māori.

The Waitangi Sheet of the Treaty of Waitangi

Treaty of Waitangi

3 links

Treaty first signed on 6 February 1840 by Captain William Hobson as consul for the British Crown and Māori chiefs (rangatira) from the North Island of New Zealand.

Treaty first signed on 6 February 1840 by Captain William Hobson as consul for the British Crown and Māori chiefs (rangatira) from the North Island of New Zealand.

The Waitangi Sheet of the Treaty of Waitangi
James Busby, British Resident in New Zealand. He drafted a document known as the Declaration of the Independence of New Zealand.
Captain William Hobson
Rev Henry Williams, who translated the treaty into Māori with the help of his son Edward Marsh Williams.
A later reconstruction in a painting by Marcus King, depicting Tāmati Wāka Nene in the act of signing. Hobson is falsely shown in full uniform (he was actually wearing civilian clothing).
The location of Waitangi within New Zealand.
The group of nine documents that make up the Treaty of Waitangi.
214x214px
Beach front scene at Kohimarama, Auckland, circa 1860, with Bishop Selwyn's Mission station where the Kohimarama Conference was held. Two waka, and a group of whare, are visible in the foreground.
Lord and Lady Bledisloe announce the gift of land and Treaty House at Waitangi to the nation in 1932
Winston Peters (founder of the New Zealand First Party), who has campaigned for the removal of references to the Treaty of Waitangi from New Zealand Law
Reverse of a 1990 one dollar coin commemorating the sesquicentenary of the Treaty of Waitangi. Using a different design a much rarer New Zealand crown commemorative coin was also minted in 1935.

Even though Māori continued to challenge this narrative, the treaty's lack of legal standing in 1840 and subsequent breaches tended to be overlooked until the 1970s when these issues were raised by the Māori protest movement.

Māori renaissance

1 links

Revival in fortunes of the Māori of New Zealand beginning in the latter half of the twentieth century.

Revival in fortunes of the Māori of New Zealand beginning in the latter half of the twentieth century.

The renaissance happened across a number of spheres, including the revival of the Māori language (with milestones such as the founding of the first kōhanga reo in 1982 and the passing of the Māori Language Act in 1987); the land-focused Māori protest movement (with the Bastion Point occupation in 1977–1978).

Raglan, New Zealand

2 links

Small beachside town located 48 km west of Hamilton, New Zealand on State Highway 23.

Small beachside town located 48 km west of Hamilton, New Zealand on State Highway 23.

Bow St in 1911 – of these buildings, only those on the far left (Harbour View Hotel) and right (skate shop and ULO) remain, plus the building in the middle distance on the right (Shack). The street retains a grassy centre, but the roads now occupy most of it.
View from Manu Bay in Raglan
Wainamu Beach, 1942 'Type 22' pillbox and Karioi. One of the airfield windsocks is visible in the middle distance. Another pillbox is beyond the windsock
The airfield was formed in 1941 by levelling the dunes on the right of this 1910 photo. The area to the left became Raglan West in the late 1940s
The two main arms of Whaingaroa Harbour, Waitetuna left and Waingaro right, divided by the Paritata Peninsula, with Karioi in the background.
Surfers in Manu Bay
Raglan's black sand beach, December 2000
Whale Bay
Kaitoke Walkway is on the south side of Raglan. At Flax Cove it has a boardwalk beside a boiler of a 1903, or 1904 flax mill
The Raglan bus carries bikes. In summer it runs here to Manu Bay.
Planting of Whāingaroa Harbour Care's 2 millionth tree with Conservation Minister, Eugenie Sage in 2020
Waipatukahu or Riki Spring, source of Raglan's water
Bow St water tower

It became a focus for local job-training and employment programs, as well as for the Māori sovereignty movement.

Traditional celebrations at Waitangi

Waitangi Day

1 links

Regarded as the founding document of the nation.

Regarded as the founding document of the nation.

Traditional celebrations at Waitangi
Treaty House and grounds at Waitangi, where the treaty was first signed. The first Waitangi Day was celebrated in the grounds on 6 February 1934.
Norman Kirk and a Māori boy on Waitangi Day, 1973
The challenge at Waitangi Day, 1976, with Prime Minister Robert Muldoon present
Prime Minister Helen Clark being welcomed onto Hoani Waititi Marae, in West Auckland, Waitangi Day 2006
The flagstaff at Waitangi, the focus of significant protest. On the flagstaff is flown, from left, the Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand; the Ensign of the Royal New Zealand Navy, and the Union Flag.
Māori protestors in 2006

The commemoration has also been the focus of protest by Māori activists, and is occasionally the focus of controversy.

Rickard campaigning for land rights at Nambassa 1979.

Eva Rickard

1 links

Activist for Māori land rights and for women’s rights within Māoridom.

Activist for Māori land rights and for women’s rights within Māoridom.

Rickard campaigning for land rights at Nambassa 1979.

After the land was returned, it became a focus for local job-training and employment programs, as well as a focus for the Māori sovereignty movement.

Tariana Turia, Governor-General Patsy Reddy and Nanaia Mahuta celebrating Te Wiki o te Reo Māori 2019

Te Wiki o te Reo Māori

0 links

Government-sponsored initiative intended to encourage New Zealanders to promote the use of the Māori language, which, along with New Zealand Sign Language, is an official language of the country.

Government-sponsored initiative intended to encourage New Zealanders to promote the use of the Māori language, which, along with New Zealand Sign Language, is an official language of the country.

Tariana Turia, Governor-General Patsy Reddy and Nanaia Mahuta celebrating Te Wiki o te Reo Māori 2019

In the early 1970s as a part of the Māori protest movement, activist group Ngā Tamatoa, the Te Reo Māori Society of Victoria University, and Te Huinga Rangatahi (the New Zealand Māori Students’ Association) presented a petition to Parliament, petitioned the government to teach te reo in schools.

Angeline Greensill

1 links

Prominent Māori political rights campaigner, academic and leader.

Prominent Māori political rights campaigner, academic and leader.

Greensill assisted in organising the land occupation at the Raglan Golf Course (see Māori protest movement), which played a prominent role in helping recognise issues around Māori land rights in New Zealand.