MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1

IcarusIcarus (star)
MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1, also known as Icarus, is a blue supergiant star observed through a gravitational lens.wikipedia
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Star

starsstellarmassive star
It is the most distant individual star detected, at approximately 14 billion light-years from Earth (redshift z=1.49; comoving distance of 14.4 billion light-years; lookback time of 9.34 billion years), as of April 2018. Light from the star was emitted 4.4 billion years after the Big Bang.
In April, 2018, astronomers reported the detection of the most distant "ordinary" (i.e., main sequence) star, named Icarus (formally, MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1), at 9 billion light-years away from Earth.

Blue supergiant star

blue supergiantBlueblue supergiants
MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1, also known as Icarus, is a blue supergiant star observed through a gravitational lens.

SDSS J1229+1122

SDSS J122952.66+112227.8
According to co-discoverer Patrick Kelly, the star is at least a hundred times more distant than the next-farthest non-supernova star observed, SDSS J1229+1122, and is the first magnified individual star seen.
Until the discovery of the doubly gravitationally lensed MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1 (also known as Icarus) in 2018, it was the most distant known star, at 55 e6ly (stars more distant than this are only known through events that they cause, such as stellar explosions of supernovae and gamma ray bursts).

SN Refsdal

Refsdal
In April and May 2016, the blue supergiant star was found in the course of studying the supernova SN Refsdal with the Hubble Space Telescope.

List of the most distant astronomical objects

most distant objectList of most distant astronomical objectsmost distant

Gravitational lens

gravitational lensinggravitationally lenseddeflection of light
MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1, also known as Icarus, is a blue supergiant star observed through a gravitational lens.

Light-year

light yearlight yearsMly
It is the most distant individual star detected, at approximately 14 billion light-years from Earth (redshift z=1.49; comoving distance of 14.4 billion light-years; lookback time of 9.34 billion years), as of April 2018.

Earth

Earth's surfaceterrestrialworld
It is the most distant individual star detected, at approximately 14 billion light-years from Earth (redshift z=1.49; comoving distance of 14.4 billion light-years; lookback time of 9.34 billion years), as of April 2018.

Redshift

red shiftzred-shift
It is the most distant individual star detected, at approximately 14 billion light-years from Earth (redshift z=1.49; comoving distance of 14.4 billion light-years; lookback time of 9.34 billion years), as of April 2018.

Comoving and proper distances

comoving distanceproper distancecomoving coordinates
It is the most distant individual star detected, at approximately 14 billion light-years from Earth (redshift z=1.49; comoving distance of 14.4 billion light-years; lookback time of 9.34 billion years), as of April 2018.

Cosmic time

lookback timeafter the Big Bangcurrent time
It is the most distant individual star detected, at approximately 14 billion light-years from Earth (redshift z=1.49; comoving distance of 14.4 billion light-years; lookback time of 9.34 billion years), as of April 2018.

Big Bang

Big Bang theoryThe Big Bangbig-bang
Light from the star was emitted 4.4 billion years after the Big Bang.

Supernova

supernovaecore-collapse supernovasupernovas
According to co-discoverer Patrick Kelly, the star is at least a hundred times more distant than the next-farthest non-supernova star observed, SDSS J1229+1122, and is the first magnified individual star seen. Normally, the only astronomical objects that can be detected at this range would be either whole galaxies, quasars, or supernovas, but the light from the star was magnified by the lensing effect.

Hubble Space Telescope

HubbleHSTHubble Telescope
In April and May 2016, the blue supergiant star was found in the course of studying the supernova SN Refsdal with the Hubble Space Telescope.

University of Minnesota

MinnesotaUniversity of Minnesota, Twin CitiesUniversity of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Astronomer Patrick Kelly of the University of Minnesota is the lead author of the finding, published in the journal Nature Astronomy.

Nature (journal)

NatureNature MagazineNature News
Astronomer Patrick Kelly of the University of Minnesota is the lead author of the finding, published in the journal Nature Astronomy.

Galaxy cluster

galaxy clusterscluster of galaxiescluster
The light from LS1 was magnified not only by the huge total mass of the galaxy cluster MACS J1149+2223—located 5 billion light-years away—but also transiently by another compact object of about three solar masses within the galaxy cluster itself that passed through the line of sight, an effect known as gravitational microlensing.

Solar mass

mass of the SunSun's masssolar masses
The light from LS1 was magnified not only by the huge total mass of the galaxy cluster MACS J1149+2223—located 5 billion light-years away—but also transiently by another compact object of about three solar masses within the galaxy cluster itself that passed through the line of sight, an effect known as gravitational microlensing.

Gravitational microlensing

microlensingmicrolensing eventdetected by microlensing
The light from LS1 was magnified not only by the huge total mass of the galaxy cluster MACS J1149+2223—located 5 billion light-years away—but also transiently by another compact object of about three solar masses within the galaxy cluster itself that passed through the line of sight, an effect known as gravitational microlensing.

Binary star

spectroscopic binaryeclipsing binarybinary
There was a second peak near the brightness curve maximum, which may indicate the star was binary.

Dark matter

dark matter detectiondark-mattermissing mass
Continuous monitoring of the star Icarus may one day rule out the possibility that primordial black holes constitute a sizable fraction of dark matter.

Quasar

quasarsquasi-stellar objectQSO
Normally, the only astronomical objects that can be detected at this range would be either whole galaxies, quasars, or supernovas, but the light from the star was magnified by the lensing effect.

MAssive Cluster Survey

MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS)
The formal name MACS J1149 is a reference to MAssive Cluster Survey and the star's coordinates in the J2000 astronomical epoch.

Epoch (astronomy)

J2000J2000.0epoch
The formal name MACS J1149 is a reference to MAssive Cluster Survey and the star's coordinates in the J2000 astronomical epoch.