MIT Radiation Laboratory

Radiation LaboratoryRadiation LabMIT Radiation LabRad LabRadiation Laboratory (MIT)Radiation Laboratory at MITAmericanM.I.T. Radiation LabM.I.T.’s Radiation LaboratoryMIT Rad Lab
The Radiation Laboratory, commonly called the Rad Lab, was a microwave and radar research laboratory located at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts (US).wikipedia
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Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MITM.I.T.Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
The Radiation Laboratory, commonly called the Rad Lab, was a microwave and radar research laboratory located at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts (US).
Engineers and scientists from across the country gathered at MIT's Radiation Laboratory, established in 1940 to assist the British military in developing microwave radar.

MIT Lincoln Laboratory

Lincoln LaboratoryLincoln Laboratory's Experimental Test SiteLincoln Lab's ETS
It was first created in October 1940 and operated until 31 December 1945 when its functions were dispersed to industry, other departments within MIT, and in 1951, the newly formed MIT Lincoln Laboratory.
Because of MIT's management of the Radiation Laboratory during World War II, the experience of some of its staff on the Air Defense Systems Engineering Committee, and its proven competence in electronics, the U.S. Air Force suggested that MIT could provide the research needed to develop an air defense that could detect, identify, and ultimately intercept air threats.

Radar

radar stationradarsradar system
The Radiation Laboratory, commonly called the Rad Lab, was a microwave and radar research laboratory located at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts (US).
Alfred Lee Loomis organized the secret MIT Radiation Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts which developed microwave radar technology in the years 1941–45.

Lee Alvin DuBridge

Lee DuBridgeLee A. DuBridgeLee A. DuBridge Professor of Astrophysics & Planetary Physics
Lee A. DuBridge served as the Rad Lab director.
On leave from Rochester between 1940 and 1946, he became the founding director of the Radiation Laboratory at MIT.

National Defense Research Committee

NDRCNational Defence Research CommitteeNational Defense Research council
Loomis arranged for funding under the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) and reorganized the Microwave Committee at MIT to study the magnetron and radar technology in general.
Under the chairmanship of Bush the NDRC created new laboratories, including the Radiation Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which aided the development of radar, and the Underwater Sound Laboratory at New London, Connecticut, which developed sonar.

LORAN

LORAN-CLORAN-AeLORAN
The Rad Lab also developed Loran-A, the first worldwide radio navigation system, which originally was known as "LRN" for Loomis Radio Navigation.
Project 3 moved to the newly formed Radiation Laboratory's Navigation Group in 1941.

H2S (radar)

H2S radarH2SFishpond
They also developed the H2X, a version of the British H2S bombing radar that operated at shorter wavelengths in the X band.
In the midst of the debate, Isidor Isaac Rabi of the American Radiation Laboratory visited the TRE offices on 5 and 6 July 1942.

Tizard Mission

British mission, led by TizardSir Henry TizardTizard delegation
In early 1940, Winston Churchill organized what became the Tizard Mission to introduce US researchers to several new technologies the UK had been developing.
The Tizard mission caused the foundation of the MIT Radiation Lab, which became one of the largest wartime projects, employing nearly 4,000 people at its peak.

Microwave

microwavesmicrowave radiationmicrowave tube
The Radiation Laboratory, commonly called the Rad Lab, was a microwave and radar research laboratory located at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts (US).
The MIT Radiation Laboratory established secretly at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1940 to research radar, produced much of the theoretical knowledge necessary to use microwaves.

Isidor Isaac Rabi

I. I. RabiIsidor RabiI.I. Rabi
In addition to the Director, Lee DuBridge, I. I. Rabi was the deputy director for scientific matters, and F. Wheeler Loomis (no relation to Alfred Loomis) was deputy director for administration.
During World War II he worked on radar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Radiation Laboratory (RadLab) and on the Manhattan Project.

Alfred Lee Loomis

Alfred LoomisAlfred L. LoomisDr Alfred Loomis
Alfred Lee Loomis, a millionaire and physicist who headed his own private laboratory, organized the Microwave Committee to consider these devices and look for improvements.
Within a month, he had selected a building on the MIT campus in which to equip a laboratory, dubbing it the MIT Radiation Laboratory, usually referred to as the Radiation Laboratory and later known simply as the Rad Lab.

Cavity magnetron

magnetronmagnetronssplit-anode magnetron
Among these was the cavity magnetron, a leap forward in the creation of microwaves that made them practical for the first time.
Bell Telephone Laboratories took the example and quickly began making copies, and before the end of 1940, the Radiation Laboratory had been set up on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to develop various types of radar using the magnetron.

Edwin McMillan

Edwin M. McMillanEdwin Mattison McMillanE.M. McMillan
Under Project 1 led by Edwin M. McMillan, an "engineered" set with an antenna using a 30 in parabolic reflector followed.
During World War II, he worked on microwave radar at the MIT Radiation Laboratory, and on sonar at the Navy Radio and Sound Laboratory.

SCR-584 radar

SCR-584K-78 trailerM-9/SCR-584 Anti-Aircraft System
Among their notable products were the SCR-584, the finest gun-laying radar of the war, and the SCR-720, an airborne interception radar that became the standard late-war system for both US and UK night fighters.
The SCR-584 (short for Set, Complete, Radio # 584) was an automatic-tracking microwave radar developed by the MIT Radiation Laboratory during World War II.

Building 20

The Rad Lab had constructed, and was the initial occupant of, MIT's famous Building 20.
The three-floor structure housed the Radiation Laboratory (or "Rad Lab"), where fundamental advances were made in physical electronics, electromagnetic properties of matter, microwave physics, and microwave communication principles, and which has been called one of America's "two prominent shrines of the triumph of science during the war" (with the desert installation at Los Alamos, where the atomic bomb was born).

Ernest Lawrence

Ernest O. LawrenceE.O. LawrenceErnest Orlando Lawrence
It was chosen to imply the laboratory's mission was similar to that of the Ernest O. Lawrence's Radiation Laboratory at UC Berkeley; i.e., that it employed scientists to work on nuclear physics research.
He helped recruit staff for the MIT Radiation Laboratory, where American physicists developed the cavity magnetron invented by Oliphant's team in Britain.

Edward George Bowen

Taffy" BowenTaffy BowenE. G. "Taffy" Bowen
On October 6, Edward George Bowen, a key developer of RDF at the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) and a member of the mission, demonstrated the magnetron, producing some 15,000 watts (15 kW) of power at 3 GHz, i.e. a wavelength of 10cm.
With remarkable speed the US military set up a special laboratory, the MIT Radiation Laboratory for the development of centimetre-wave radar, and Bowen collaborated closely with them on their programme, writing the first draft specification for their first system.

Vannevar Bush

Bush, VannevarBushV. Bush
In June 1941, the NDRC became part of the new Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD), also administered by Vannevar Bush, who reported directly to President Roosevelt.
The Radiation Laboratory, as it came to be known, tested its airborne radar from an Army B-18 on March 27, 1941.

Luis Walter Alvarez

Luis AlvarezLuis W. AlvarezLuis
A radically different type of antenna for X-band systems was invented by Luis W. Alvarez and used in three new systems: an airborne mapping radar called Eagle, a blind-landing Ground Control Approach (GCA) system, and a ground-based Microwave Early-Warning (MEW) system.
In 1940 Alvarez joined the MIT Radiation Laboratory, where he contributed to a number of World War II radar projects, from early improvements to Identification friend or foe (IFF) radar beacons, now called transponders, to a system known as VIXEN for preventing enemy submarines from realizing that they had been found by the new airborne microwave radars.

Jerome Wiesner

Jerome B. WiesnerJerry WiesnerJ. B. Wiesner
Led by Jerome B. Wiesner, the project involved a high-power radar carried in a pod under a TBM Avenger aircraft and a Combat Information Center aboard an aircraft carrier.
During World War II, he worked on microwave radar development at the MIT Radiation Laboratory.

Anti-aircraft warfare

anti-aircraftanti-aircraft gunair defense
In the order of priority, these were (1) a 10-cm detection system (called Airborne Intercept or AI) for fighter aircraft, (2) a 10-cm gun-aiming system (called Gun Laying or GL) for anti-aircraft batteries, and (3) a long-range airborne radio navigation system.
Incoming targets were acquired and automatically tracked by SCR-584 radar, developed at the MIT Rad Lab.

Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT

Research Laboratory of ElectronicsRLELaboratory for Electronics
When the Radiation Laboratory closed, the OSRD agreed to continue funding for the Basic Research Division, which officially became part of MIT on July 1, 1946, as the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT (RLE).
The Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was founded in 1946 as the successor to the famed MIT Radiation Laboratory (Rad Lab) of World War II.

Ivan A. Getting

Ivan GettingIvan Alexander GettingDr. Ivan Alexander Getting
Ivan A. Getting served as the project leader.
He then worked at Harvard University on nuclear instrumentation and cosmic rays (Junior Fellow, 1935-1940) and the MIT Radiation Laboratory (1940-1950; Director of the Division on Fire Control and Army Radar, Associate Professor 1945; Professor 1946).

Donald G. Fink

Fink, Donald G.
The LORAN Division was established for the project and headed by Donald G. Fink.
During World War II, he worked at the MIT Radiation Laboratory and traveled overseas installing LORAN sites.

Telecommunications Research Establishment

TREBawdsey Research Stationearly radar in the UK during World War II
On October 6, Edward George Bowen, a key developer of RDF at the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) and a member of the mission, demonstrated the magnetron, producing some 15,000 watts (15 kW) of power at 3 GHz, i.e. a wavelength of 10cm.