MMRV vaccine

MMRVProQuadMeasles, combinations with mumps, rubella and varicella, live attenuatedmeasles/mumps/rubella/varicellaPriorix Tetra
The MMRV vaccine combines the attenuated virus MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine with the addition of the chickenpox vaccine or varicella vaccine (V stands for varicella).wikipedia
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MMR vaccine

MMRmeasles-mumps-rubella vaccineMMR vaccination
The MMRV vaccine combines the attenuated virus MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine with the addition of the chickenpox vaccine or varicella vaccine (V stands for varicella).
The MMRV vaccine which also covers chickenpox may be used instead.

Mumps

Mumps meningoencephalitisCongenital mumpsMumps encephalitis
The MMRV vaccine combines the attenuated virus MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine with the addition of the chickenpox vaccine or varicella vaccine (V stands for varicella). The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends vaccinating against measles, mumps, rubella (German measles), and varicella (chickenpox) because the risks of these diseases far outweigh the risks of vaccinating against them.
The vaccine may be given separately or as part of the MMR vaccine or MMRV vaccine.

Febrile seizure

febrile seizuresFebrile convulsionsfebrile
There are 4.3 additional febrile seizures per 10,000 vaccinated children (95% CI 2.6–5.6), 7.5 additional mostly mild fever episodes per 100 vaccinated children (95% CI, 5.4–9.4) and 1.1 additional measles-like rash per 100 children (95% CI, 0.2–1.8).
Implicated vaccines include measles/mumps/rubella/varicella, diphtheria/tetanus/acellular pertussis/polio/Haemophilus influenzae type b, whole-cell pertussis, some versions of the pneumococcal vaccine, and some types of influenza vaccine when given together with the pneumococcal vaccine or diphtheria/tetanus/acellular pertussis vaccine.

Measles vaccine

measles vaccinationmeaslesAttenuvax
The vaccine is available both by itself and in combinations such as the MMR vaccine (a combination with the rubella vaccine and mumps vaccine) or the MMRV vaccine (a combination of MMR with the chickenpox vaccine).

Varicella vaccine

chickenpox vaccinevaricellaVarivax
The MMRV vaccine combines the attenuated virus MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine with the addition of the chickenpox vaccine or varicella vaccine (V stands for varicella).
The vaccine is available either by itself or along with the MMR vaccine, in a version known as the MMRV vaccine.

Mumps vaccine

mumpsvaccineimmunized
A formulation with the previous three and the varicella (chickenpox) vaccine known as MMRV is also available.

Rubella vaccine

rubellarubella vaccinationMeruvax II
Combinations include with measles (MR vaccine), measles and mumps vaccine (MMR vaccine) and measles, mumps and varicella vaccine (MMRV vaccine).

Attenuated vaccine

attenuatedlive vaccinelive attenuated
The MMRV vaccine combines the attenuated virus MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine with the addition of the chickenpox vaccine or varicella vaccine (V stands for varicella).

Measles

Rubeolameasles encephalitisAcute Measles encephalitis
The MMRV vaccine combines the attenuated virus MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine with the addition of the chickenpox vaccine or varicella vaccine (V stands for varicella). The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends vaccinating against measles, mumps, rubella (German measles), and varicella (chickenpox) because the risks of these diseases far outweigh the risks of vaccinating against them.

Rubella

German measlesdisease of the same namematernal rubella
The MMRV vaccine combines the attenuated virus MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine with the addition of the chickenpox vaccine or varicella vaccine (V stands for varicella). The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends vaccinating against measles, mumps, rubella (German measles), and varicella (chickenpox) because the risks of these diseases far outweigh the risks of vaccinating against them.

Chickenpox

chicken poxvaricellaCongenital varicella syndrome
The MMRV vaccine combines the attenuated virus MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine with the addition of the chickenpox vaccine or varicella vaccine (V stands for varicella). The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends vaccinating against measles, mumps, rubella (German measles), and varicella (chickenpox) because the risks of these diseases far outweigh the risks of vaccinating against them.

Merck & Co.

MerckMerck & CoMerck & Co., Inc.
ProQuad is marketed by Merck and was approved in 2005, for use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for children ages twelve months through twelve years.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
ProQuad is marketed by Merck and was approved in 2005, for use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for children ages twelve months through twelve years.

Food and Drug Administration

FDAU.S. Food and Drug AdministrationUnited States Food and Drug Administration
ProQuad is marketed by Merck and was approved in 2005, for use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for children ages twelve months through twelve years.

GlaxoSmithKline

GlaxoSmithKline BeechamGSK
An MMRV vaccine called Priorix Tetra by GlaxoSmithKline has been approved in Germany and Australia.

World Health Organization

WHOWorld Health OrganisationWorld Health Organization (WHO)
The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends vaccinating against measles, mumps, rubella (German measles), and varicella (chickenpox) because the risks of these diseases far outweigh the risks of vaccinating against them.

HIV/AIDS

AIDSHIVacquired immune deficiency syndrome
Doctors are advised to be aware of whether or not a patient has HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system, is taking a medication that affects the immune system, has cancer, a fever or active untreated tuberculosis, is receiving cancer treatment, or has ever had a low platelet count (a blood disorder).

Immune system

immuneimmune responseimmune function
Doctors are advised to be aware of whether or not a patient has HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system, is taking a medication that affects the immune system, has cancer, a fever or active untreated tuberculosis, is receiving cancer treatment, or has ever had a low platelet count (a blood disorder).

Reye syndrome

Reye's syndromeReyes SyndromeReye hepatocerebral syndrome

Allergy

allergiesallergic reactionallergic
Rare but serious adverse events reported following ProQuad vaccination include allergic reactions, including swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; difficulty breathing or closing of the throat; hives; paleness; weakness; dizziness; a fast heart beat; deafness; long-term seizures, coma, or lowered consciousness; seizures (jerking or staring) caused by fever; or temporary low platelet count.

Hives

urticariaurticarialpapular urticaria
Rare but serious adverse events reported following ProQuad vaccination include allergic reactions, including swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; difficulty breathing or closing of the throat; hives; paleness; weakness; dizziness; a fast heart beat; deafness; long-term seizures, coma, or lowered consciousness; seizures (jerking or staring) caused by fever; or temporary low platelet count.

Hearing loss

deafdeafnesshearing impairment
Rare but serious adverse events reported following ProQuad vaccination include allergic reactions, including swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; difficulty breathing or closing of the throat; hives; paleness; weakness; dizziness; a fast heart beat; deafness; long-term seizures, coma, or lowered consciousness; seizures (jerking or staring) caused by fever; or temporary low platelet count.

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