MTV

MTV.comMTV BuzzworthyMTV GamesMTV NewsMTV NetworkMusic TelevisionMTV GeekMTV OverdriveMTV IggyMTV Studios
MTV (originally an initialism of Music Television) is an American pay television channel launched on August 1, 1981 based in New York City that serves as the flagship property of the Viacom Media Networks division of Viacom headquartered in New York City.wikipedia
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List of MTV channels

sister channelschannels around the worldinternationally
MTV has spawned numerous sister channels in the U.S. and affiliated channels internationally, some of which have gone independent, with approximately 90.6 million American households in the United States receiving the channel as of January 2016.
This list of MTV channels includes every channel broadcast by Viacom Media Networks (known as MTV Networks until 2011) or its partners or affiliates, beginning with the original MTV (Music Television) channel in the U.S., and proceeding by continent, in order of arrival.

Music video

music videosvideovideo album
MTV originally aired music videos as guided by television personalities known as "video jockeys" (VJs), but in the years since its inception, the network significantly toned down its focus on music in favor of original reality programming targeting teenagers and young adults.
Although the origins of the music video date back to musical short films that first appeared in the 1920s, they again came into prominence in the 1980s when the channel MTV (originally "Music Television") based their format around the medium.

Robert Pittman (media executive)

Bob PittmanRobert W. PittmanRobert Pittman
The original programming format of MTV was created by media executive Robert W. Pittman, who later became president and chief executive officer (CEO) of MTV Networks.
Pittman was the CEO of MTV Networks and the cofounder and programmer who led the team that created MTV.

PopClips

Pop Clips
Pittman's boss Warner-Amex executive vice president John Lack had shepherded PopClips, a television series created by former Monkee-turned solo artist Michael Nesmith, whose attention had turned to the music video format in the late 1970s.
PopClips is a music video television program, the direct predecessor of MTV.

List of first music videos aired on MTV

first music videos aired on MTVfirst music video shown on MTVfirst day of broadcast
The first music video shown on MTV was The Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star", originally only available to homes in New Jersey.
This is a list of the first music videos broadcast on MTV's first day, August 1, 1981.

Viacom Media Networks

MTV NetworksBET NetworksMTV
MTV (originally an initialism of Music Television) is an American pay television channel launched on August 1, 1981 based in New York City that serves as the flagship property of the Viacom Media Networks division of Viacom headquartered in New York City.
The company was founded in 1984 after Warner Communications and American Express decided to divest the basic cable assets of Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, renaming it as MTV Networks, Inc. Warner-Amex had originally created and owned Nickelodeon, MTV, VH1 and The Movie Channel (TMC).

Reality television

realityreality showreality TV
MTV originally aired music videos as guided by television personalities known as "video jockeys" (VJs), but in the years since its inception, the network significantly toned down its focus on music in favor of original reality programming targeting teenagers and young adults.
One year later, the same concept was used by MTV in its new series The Real World.

MTV News

MTV BuzzworthyMTVMTV ''News
As programming chief, Robert W. Pittman recruited and managed a team for the launch that included Tom Freston (who succeeded Pittman as CEO of MTV Networks), Fred Seibert, John Sykes, Carolyn Baker (original head of talent and acquisition), Marshall Cohen (original head of research), Gail Sparrow (of talent and acquisition), Sue Steinberg (executive producer), Julian Goldberg, Steve Lawrence, Geoff Bolton; studio producers and MTV News writers/associate producers Liz Nealon, Nancy LaPook and Robin Zorn; Steve Casey (creator of the name "MTV" and its first program director), Marcy Brafman, Ronald E. "Buzz" Brindle, and Robert Morton.
MTV News is the news production division of MTV.

John Sykes (American businessman)

John SykesSykes
As programming chief, Robert W. Pittman recruited and managed a team for the launch that included Tom Freston (who succeeded Pittman as CEO of MTV Networks), Fred Seibert, John Sykes, Carolyn Baker (original head of talent and acquisition), Marshall Cohen (original head of research), Gail Sparrow (of talent and acquisition), Sue Steinberg (executive producer), Julian Goldberg, Steve Lawrence, Geoff Bolton; studio producers and MTV News writers/associate producers Liz Nealon, Nancy LaPook and Robin Zorn; Steve Casey (creator of the name "MTV" and its first program director), Marcy Brafman, Ronald E. "Buzz" Brindle, and Robert Morton.
Sykes was co-founder of MTV and throughout his tenure has held leadership positions including President at VH1, President - North America at Chrysalis Records, Executive Vice President of Artist Acquisitions at EMI Music Publishing, Chairman and CEO at Infinity Broadcasting Corporation (now Entercom) and President of New Network Development at MTV Networks (now Viacom Media Networks).

The Now Explosion

In 1970, Philadelphia-based disc jockey Bob Whitney created The Now Explosion, a television series filmed in Atlanta and broadcast in syndication to other local television stations throughout the United States.
The Now Explosion was an early experiment in music video produced in Atlanta, Georgia in 1970, more than a decade before MTV was launched.

Second British Invasion

British InvasionBritish electronic sceneBritish New Wave
MTV sparked the Second British Invasion, with British acts, who had been accustomed to using music videos for half a decade (some of which appeared on the BBC’s Top of the Pops), featuring heavily on the channel.
The Second British Invasion consisted of music acts from the United Kingdom that became popular in the United States during the early-to-mid 1980s primarily due to the cable music channel MTV.

Alan Hunter (VJ)

Alan Hunter
The original five MTV VJs in 1981 were Nina Blackwood, Mark Goodman, Alan Hunter, J.J. Jackson and Martha Quinn.
Alan Caldwell Hunter (born February 14, 1957) is one of the original five video jockeys (VJs) on MTV from 1981 to 1987 (along with Nina Blackwood, Mark Goodman, Martha Quinn, and J.J. Jackson).

VJ (media personality)

VJvideo jockeyVJs
MTV originally aired music videos as guided by television personalities known as "video jockeys" (VJs), but in the years since its inception, the network significantly toned down its focus on music in favor of original reality programming targeting teenagers and young adults.
A video jockey (abbreviated VJ or sometimes veejay) is an announcer who introduces music videos and live performances on commercial music television stations such as VH1, MTV, Channel V and Much Music.

J.J. Jackson (media personality)

J.J. Jackson
The original five MTV VJs in 1981 were Nina Blackwood, Mark Goodman, Alan Hunter, J.J. Jackson and Martha Quinn.
He was one of MTV's five original VJs (along with Nina Blackwood, Mark Goodman, Alan Hunter, and Martha Quinn).

New wave music

new wavenew-wavenew wave revival
Rock bands and performers of the 1980s who had airplay on MTV ranged from new wave to hard rock or heavy metal bands such as Adam Ant, Bryan Adams, The Pretenders, Blondie, Eurythmics, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Culture Club, Mötley Crüe, Split Enz, Prince, Ultravox, Duran Duran, Van Halen, Bon Jovi, RATT, Def Leppard, The Police, and The Cars.
New wave has been called one of the definitive genres of the 1980s, as it was promoted heavily by MTV (the Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star" was broadcast as the first music video to promote the channel's launch).

The Buggles

Buggles
The first music video shown on MTV was The Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star", originally only available to homes in New Jersey.
That same year, on 1 August, the music video for "Video Killed the Radio Star" became the first ever shown on MTV in the US.

Duran Duran

Sphere StudiosWes WehmillerDuran
Rock bands and performers of the 1980s who had airplay on MTV ranged from new wave to hard rock or heavy metal bands such as Adam Ant, Bryan Adams, The Pretenders, Blondie, Eurythmics, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Culture Club, Mötley Crüe, Split Enz, Prince, Ultravox, Duran Duran, Van Halen, Bon Jovi, RATT, Def Leppard, The Police, and The Cars.
The group were a leading band in the MTV-driven Second British Invasion of the US in the 1980s.

Martha Quinn

Martha C. Quinn
The original five MTV VJs in 1981 were Nina Blackwood, Mark Goodman, Alan Hunter, J.J. Jackson and Martha Quinn.
Martha Conrad Quinn (born May 11, 1959) is an actress and television personality, best known as one of the original video jockeys on MTV (along with Nina Blackwood, Mark Goodman, Alan Hunter, and J.J. Jackson).

Video Killed the Radio Star

Radio Starvideo really ''might'' kill the radio star
The first music video shown on MTV was The Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star", originally only available to homes in New Jersey.
It was the first music video shown on MTV in the US, airing at 12:01a.m. on 1 August 1981, and the first video shown on MTV Classic in the UK on 1 March 2010.

Nina Blackwood

The original five MTV VJs in 1981 were Nina Blackwood, Mark Goodman, Alan Hunter, J.J. Jackson and Martha Quinn.
Nina Blackwood (born September 12, 1955) is an American disc jockey and music journalist, who was the first of the original five MTV VJs (along with Mark Goodman, J.J. Jackson, Alan Hunter, and Martha Quinn).

"Weird Al" Yankovic

Weird Al YankovicWeird Al"Weird" Al Yankovic
The channel also rotated the music videos of "Weird Al" Yankovic, who made a career out of parodying other artists' videos.
He has also made guest appearances and performed voice acting roles on many television shows and video web content, in addition to starring in Al TV specials on MTV.

Def Leppard

Tony KenningBludgeon RiffolaDeff Leppard
Rock bands and performers of the 1980s who had airplay on MTV ranged from new wave to hard rock or heavy metal bands such as Adam Ant, Bryan Adams, The Pretenders, Blondie, Eurythmics, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Culture Club, Mötley Crüe, Split Enz, Prince, Ultravox, Duran Duran, Van Halen, Bon Jovi, RATT, Def Leppard, The Police, and The Cars.
Their 1981 album, High 'n' Dry, was produced by Robert John "Mutt" Lange, who helped them begin to define their style, and the album's main track "Bringin' On the Heartbreak" became one of the first rock videos played on MTV in 1982.

Jonathan Elias

Those words were immediately followed by the original MTV theme song, a crunching rock tune composed by Jonathan Elias and John Petersen, playing over the American flag changed to show MTV's logo changing into various textures and designs.
The company had several notable successes, including the crunching "Moon Landing" theme used in the top-of-the-hour branding of MTV, the Columbia Pictures logo theme, and the famous Yahoo! yodel.

Tom Freston

As programming chief, Robert W. Pittman recruited and managed a team for the launch that included Tom Freston (who succeeded Pittman as CEO of MTV Networks), Fred Seibert, John Sykes, Carolyn Baker (original head of talent and acquisition), Marshall Cohen (original head of research), Gail Sparrow (of talent and acquisition), Sue Steinberg (executive producer), Julian Goldberg, Steve Lawrence, Geoff Bolton; studio producers and MTV News writers/associate producers Liz Nealon, Nancy LaPook and Robin Zorn; Steve Casey (creator of the name "MTV" and its first program director), Marcy Brafman, Ronald E. "Buzz" Brindle, and Robert Morton.
He was one of the founding members of the team that created a music video channel MTV in 1981.

Peter Gabriel

GabrielJohn Mellencamp, Neil Young, Peter GabrielPete Gabriel
MTV also played classic rock acts from the 1980s and earlier decades, including David Bowie, Dire Straits (whose 1985 song and video "Money for Nothing" both referenced MTV and also included the slogan "I want my MTV" in its lyrics), Journey, Rush, Linda Ronstadt, Genesis, Billy Squier, Aerosmith, The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, The Moody Blues, John Mellencamp, Daryl Hall & John Oates, Billy Joel, Robert Palmer, Rod Stewart, The Who, and ZZ Top; newly solo acts such as Peter Gabriel, Robert Plant, Phil Collins, Paul McCartney, David Lee Roth, and Pete Townshend; supergroup acts such as Asia, The Power Station, Yes, The Firm, and Traveling Wilburys, as well as forgotten acts such as Michael Stanley Band, Shoes, Blotto, Ph.D., Rockpile, Bootcamp, Silicon Teens and Taxxi.
The album's most successful single, "Sledgehammer", won a record nine MTV Awards at the 1987 MTV Video Music Awards and, according to a report in 2011, it was MTV's most played music video of all time.